Dallas Is Suing to Shut Down Jaguars, the Strip Joint and After-Hours Club Busted for Drugs

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Google Maps
Come for the nude women, stay for the Roman Colosseum-esque architecture.
Jaguars isn't just any strip club. "Built with the look of the Roman Colosseum, we promise a first class night out each and every night," its website explains, adding modestly, "This simply the greatest nude club in the country." Would a not-great strip club be open until "???" on Saturday nights? Or give its employees the gift of taking off their clothes on Christmas Day?

But before you rush and cancel your holiday plans, know that Jaguars' "Sexy X-Mas" won't happen if the Grinches in the Dallas' city attorney's office get their way. This morning, they sued to have the club shut down.

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Dallas Police Department to Add 200 Body Cameras in January

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Throwawaysixtynine
Illustration of a potential police body camera setup.
Citing the need to increase transparency, accountability and community engagement, Dallas Police Chief David Brown said that his department will use forfeiture funds to purchase 200 body cameras that will begin recording early next year.

The move comes in the midst of statewide movement toward using the cameras. State Senator Royce West introduced a bill for the upcoming legislative session that would require all police departments in the state to purchase and use the cameras. The Fort Worth Police Department already has 600 of the cameras and Lancaster, Duncanville and Denton's departments are looking to get their hands on some. Susan Hawk, the newly elected Dallas district attorney, has offered to buy body cameras for DPD with funds from her office as well.

In October, DPD concluded a pilot program during which it tested 50 of the cameras. Those cameras are still being used, and some officer have started using their own. The aftermath of Tuesday morning's cop shooting at a North Dallas Wal-Mart was captured on a responding officer's personal camera.

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Dallas' Median Income Peaked in 1969

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Wikipedia
It all went south when the Cowboys lost Roger Staubach to Jones Lang Lasalle.
Remember Dallas in 1969? Roger Staubach had just joined the Cowboys. A noose of freeways was closing in around downtown. DISD was planning to desegregate its schools any minute.

Enjoy the memories, because it's all been downhill since then -- "it" being the economic well-being of the average Dallas resident. The Washington Post published a nifty interactive map this week showing when the median household income for each U.S. county peaked.

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Three Dead in Thanksgiving Tower Fire

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Dallas Office of Emergency Management
Firefighters at Thanksgiving Tower today.
Three workers were confirmed dead after a fire broke out in Thanksgiving Tower's garage. They were working 35 feet deep in an HVAC system tank when the fire started. Dallas Fire and Rescue was able to evacuate almost 2,800 others from the building, but could not get to the workers because of fire and heavy smoke, spokesman Jason Evans said.

The workers were subcontractors for Best Mechanical Inc., a Seagoville air conditioning management and repair company. Cheri Torres, a spokeswoman for the company, said they had safety equipment and evacuation procedures.

Firefighters are still in the process of removing the men's bodies from the building, Evans said.

Plano Ignores Cries of Hometown Liberty Institute, Passes LGBT Equal Rights Ordinance

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Plano Mayor Harry LaRosiliere, who emerged on Monday as a fierce proponent of expanded LGBT protections.
In Houston, the cosmopolitan big city with an openly gay mayor, the battle over an equal-rights ordinance that barred discrimination against the LGBT community raged for months before the City Council approved it in May. In Plano, the quintessential Texas suburb and home base of the Liberty Institute, the religious-right vanguard, it lasted about two hours.

The Plano City Council passed its Equal Right Policy by a 5-3 vote on Monday evening, outlawing discrimination in employment, housing and in "places of public accommodation" (e.g. businesses) on the basis of "sexual orientation and gender identity." The ordinance extends those same protections to veterans for good measure.

By now, all the major cities in Texas -- Dallas, Fort Worth, El Paso, Austin, San Antonio, Houston -- have some version of a non-discrimination ordinance. But Plano is different. While Frisco has supplanted Plano in the public imagination as North Texas' most irritatingly shiny and self-satisfied outpost, Plano remains a byword for the deep-crimson conservatism of the Texas suburb. Nevertheless, it's LGBT ordinance zipped through city government with lightning speed, passing only three days after the item was posted on the City Council agenda. Plano is also different because nowhere else in Texas has the religious right been so satisfyingly brushed aside.

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Oil Dropped to $63 a Barrel Monday, What Does That Mean?

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ErgoSum88
A couple of pumpjacks near Midland.
By the close of business Monday, a barrel of West Texas Intermediate crude oil, the U.S. benchmark, dropped another 4 percent. Since July the price of oil is down 40 percent, which seems like it could be a disaster for Texas, given the portion of the state economy based on energy production.

"If you were to look at oil and gas activity as a percent of [Texas'] output, I'm not talking about the absolute level, I'm talking about relative to the state's economy, it's three times greater today than it was a decade ago," says Bud Weinstein, the associate director of the Maguire Energy Institute at SMU.

Producing all that energy requires energy, he says, which is what makes the effect of diving oil prices on the Texas economy a complicated question to answer.

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Texas Is Woefully Unprepared for Ebola Pet Outbreak, Report Says

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Bentley the dog, may he live a long and prosperous life, survived Dallas' recent brush with Ebola. Maybe it was the $27,000 the city spent on his care. Maybe it's that, though it appears that dogs can be infected with the virus if they snack on Ebola-infected animal carcasses or lick vomit from infected humans, they don't become ill.

In any case, Texans should all breath a sigh of relief, not only because Bentley is so much cuddlier and more adorable -- and, importantly, more American -- than the African human who died here, but because Texas would have been woefully unprepared had the disease had swept through the state's pet population.

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Dallas Group Files a Complaint with the Department of Justice Against City, DPD for Police Brutality

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Chief David Brown's department has a history of police abuse, claims a complaint filed with the Department of Justice.
On Thursday, a Dallas community organization will file a formal complaint with the Department of Justice against Dallas and its police department for fostering what the group sees as an environment in which police officers can kill blacks and Hispanics without fear of consequences. The complaint is the product of months of work from members of Dallas Communities Organizing for Change and its lawyer, Shayan Elahi.

"I started working on this around March," Elahi wrote in an email, "and it took shape over summer." Before starting work on the complaint, the group had filed open-records requests with the Dallas Police Department and received information on all police shootings since 2002. Based on that information, the group wrote a report showing that minorities are much more likely to be victims of police shootings here, which mirrors a national trend. Elahi said the group waited until now to file because members had hoped the City Council would meet and discuss their report and possible solutions. However, Elahi wrote, "except for Councilman Adam Medrano, no one else agreed to meet with us. So the best course was to go directly to DOJ."

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Few Dallas Police Live in Dallas, and That's Not Changing Anytime Soon

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Kevin Todora
Most Dallas police officers don't live in Dallas. Does that matter?
Policing a city like Dallas, even as crime falls, never goes smoothly. But it's been an especially rocky year for the Dallas Police Department, where, in the wake of Ferguson's violence, the city saw string of officers shooting and sometimes killing citizens.

The violence led to multiple town hall meetings hosted by District Attorney Craig Watkins, where attendees had one major suggestion for improving relations: Make more of the force live in the city they patrol. Only about a fifth of Dallas cops live in Dallas proper. If more lived in town, activists say, they would be perceived as less an occupying force and more of a really vigilant and badass neighbor.

It's a logical enough thesis and the rationale for residency requirements that exist across the city, although the data suggests the impact isn't what you might expect. Regardless: It's not happening.

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Escorted by Cops, Protesters Flooded Downtown Dallas Last Night to Decry Police Brutality

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Sky Chadde
Marchers had a police escort, which stopped traffic so they could pass through intersections. Here, the marchers turn into Main Street Garden.
Marchers, about 50 strong which would grow to a couple hundred, walked from Founder's Square, down the right lane of Main Street, to Main Street Garden last night in protest of police brutality, which in Dallas and nationwide disproportionately affects blacks. Chants of "indict, convict, put those killer cops in jail, the whole damn system is guilty as hell" and "this is what a police state looks like" filled downtown, as well as sirens from the marchers' police escorts. One man in a T-shirt with the Dallas Police Department logo shouted "go police" from the sidewalk as he watched the marchers.

A who's who of the Dallas anti-police brutality movement was there: Collette Flanagan, who founded Mothers Against Police Brutality after police shot and killed her son, Clinton Allen; Charles Goodson, of the Huey P. Newton Gun Club that recently delivered a report on police shootings to the U.S. Attorney's Office; and Kooper Karaway, of the Indigenous People's Liberation Party that helped the Gun Club deliver the report.

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