GOP Candidate Tony Tinderholt Says He Didn't Catch Illegal Immigrants. He Just Learned about Them, Called Border Patrol

Categories: Campaign News

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Facebook
On Saturday, when the other, more ordinary candidates for the Texas House of Representatives were probably making campaign calls or hanging out with their lame families, Arlington Republican Tony Tinderholt appeared to be on a bolder mission.

Dressed in camouflage gear, Tinderholt posed for three photographs posted to Facebook Saturday night under the caption, "On patrol, catching illegal immigrants tonight!"

He was on a private ranch, he tells Unfair Park, with Texas Border Volunteers, a group that takes a D.I.Y approach to fighting illegal immigration. But he realized after he arrived there would be no actual "catching" involved.

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Dallas County Judge Candidate Has Two DWIs, Two Nicknames and a Rock-Hard Bod

Categories: Campaign News

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A Facebook photo from Jackson's since-deleted profile.
If Fred Jackson wins his bid for Justice of the Peace in the upcoming Democratic Primary, lawbreakers should prepare to face a man packing a hard, award-winning body under his judicial robe.

Here are other things they should prepare for: a DWI conviction when he was a cop in which he crashed into five parked cars; allegations that he beat up a student and slept on the job when he worked school security; and his various nicknames, which include Incredible Hulk.

Jackson, 32, is running for Justice of the Peace in Precinct 4, Place 2, a Dallas County court that deals with eviction cases, tow hearings and various Class C offenses from its Irving location. Voting results so far show he has a decent chance of winning. He got 4,000 votes in the March primary, giving him 32 percent of the votes cast in his race. The incumbent and first-place winner, Judge Katy Hubener, beat him by just 432 votes. They face each other again in the runoff election May 27.

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Judge Etta Mullin Has Been Thrifty with County's Money, But Attorneys Say It Comes at a Price

Categories: Campaign News

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When a few Dallas cops arrested a woman hanging out in the 4300 block of Colonial Avenue last year, it seemed obvious they weren't catching a criminal who had a ton of money.

Officers Charles Moreland and Clayton Edwards were working undercover on March 28 when they came across Amber Buford. Moreland and Buford got into a conversation. The conversation moved fast, at least according to an arrest report: "During the conversation the suspect knowingly: agreed to sexual conduct sexual intercourse with said officer for a fee paid: directly to the suspect by the officer."

The officers arrested Buford on a prostitution charge. But that wasn't the end of her troubles. Buford's case ended up in the courtroom of County Judge Etta J. Mullin, who has built a reputation on being the thriftiest judge in Dallas County. She is up for re-election in the Democratic primary on Tuesday.

Mullin is what critics call "a bill collector instead of a judge," in the words of Lisa Green, one of the two Democrats running against Mullin.

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Wendy Davis' Opponents Say She'll Kill Texas' Oil Boom, but What Does Her Record Say?

Categories: Campaign News

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The Texas Tribune
We know that a Wendy Davis-governed Texas would probably be more into preserving natural resources than a Texas ruled by Greg Abbott, who has sued the EPA a modest 17 times. But in a state famous for its lax environmental regulations, how much tougher would Davis be?

Local environmental issues, particularly fracking, haven't been discussed much by either the Davis or the Abbott campaign. One website dedicated to exposing "the Real Wendy" (paid for by the Republican Party of Texas) has claimed that her energy policies would undermine Texas' domestic energy boom.

That's probably an overstatement, but Davis has pushed for some regulations on oil companies -- nothing stringent enough to put a company out of business, but measures that do have support from anti-drilling activists. Local environmental groups describe her as someone sensitive to their cause.

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A Man Is Responsible For Wendy Davis' Success, DMN Story Timidly Suggests

Categories: Campaign News

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Wendy Davis
The Dallas Morning News clearly wanted to publish a story reporting that Wendy Davis exaggerated about growing up poor while raising kids on her own. That's plain by the title of its big feature on the Sunday front page: "As Wendy Davis touts life story in race for governor, key facts blurred."

Sure, if it turned out that Wendy Davis was never a single, teenage mom living in a mobile home, as she has repeatedly mentioned, but was actually a happily married, childless woman who grew up in Plano and settled with her husband in her parent's basement, that would count as lying about some key facts.

Unfortunately for The Dallas Morning News, the report didn't find that. Instead we are left with a timid little story that suggests, but never says outright, that Davis' rise from poverty to senator wasn't so bad because she had a man.

You can see how a story like that might be a little offensive to girl politicians, Democrat or Republican. But don't worry, News reporter Wayne Slater has his facts. He came to that conclusion by quoting a grand total of three people -- Davis herself, one of her ex-husbands and an anonymous source who suggests that Davis is a liar who cares more about success than her children.

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Wendy Davis Is Running for Governor

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Callie Richmond, Texas Tribune
It's official. Wendy Davis, the Fort Worth Democrat who rose to national prominence during her summer filibuster of abortion legislation, is running for governor. She made the announcement just now in the Haltom City auditorium where she graduated from high school.

Already, pro-life groups are readying ads that will portray her as a ruthless baby-killing machine. She will have to clear that hurdle if she hopes to reach the governor's mansion. She'll also have to haul in some major campaign donations and woo Latinos and suburban women. Most of all, she'll have to get more votes than Greg Abbott.

A D.C. Businessman Illegally Funded Hillary Clinton "Street Teams" in 2008 Texas Primary, Feds Say

Categories: Campaign News

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Talk Radio News Service
Remember all of the awesome details from the 2008 Democratic primary race in Texas between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama? No? Weird. Well the short version of that story is that Clinton won Texas. The longer version is that a businessman from Washington D.C spent hundreds of thousands of secret money in Texas in the effort to help Clinton win.

The Washington Post broke that piece of news. The paper reports that a New York marketing executive spent more than $608,000 trying to get Texans to support Hillary Clinton. The money went to "street teams" that would distribute Hillary Clinton posters, stickers and yard signs. None of it was reported to the Federal Elections Commission.

The guy accused of funneling the street-team funds to the New York marketing executive is Jeffrey E. Thompson, a D.C. businessman who is already kind of a big deal in the district for his alleged role in a bunch of other corruption scandals.

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Barry Smitherman Says He's Preparing Texas to Become "Island Nation" for U.S. Collapse

Categories: Campaign News

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Barry Smitherman: Fighting to secure the border ... possibly from the rest of America.
The way Railroad Commission Chairman and Texas Attorney General candidate Barry Smitherman tells it, the aim of his 10 years of public service was not brazen tub-thumping for the industry he regulates in order to shore up deep-pocketed benefactors for his political aspirations. It's only ever been about readying Texas for the coming economic collapse of the United States of America.

"We are uniquely situated because we have energy resources, fossil and otherwise, and our own independent electrical grid," he told noted conspiracy mill World Net Daily. "Generally speaking, we have made great progress in becoming an independent nation, an 'island nation' if you will, and I think we want to continue down that path so that if the rest of the country falls apart, Texas can operate as a stand-alone entity with energy, food, water and roads as if we were a closed-loop system."

Notwithstanding the fact that Texas has the most anemic electricity reserves in the country, Smitherman does have a point: We do in fact have a whole lot of oil. Oil, WND notes, Smitherman has almost single-handedly kept flowing via hydraulic fracturing, beating back attempts from President Barack Obama to stanch it. Texas oil production is at its highest since the mid-'80s.

In case you were laboring under the delusion that the Railroad Commission of Texas sees its charge as anything other than promoting the production of oil and gas as rapidly as possible, consequences be damned, Smitherman sets the record straight: "This was one of my goals at the Utility Commission and it is one my goals currently as chairman of the Railroad Commission. That's why I stress so vehemently oil and gas production, permitting turnaround times, and everything that enables the industry to produce as much as it can, as quickly as it can."

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A Tarrant County Water Fight Descends into the Slop with the Help of a Dallas Hotel Magnate

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You'd think the race for the Tarrant Regional Water Board would be a sleepy affair. Ensuring that Fort Worth and its environs enjoy an adequate water supply is undeniably important work, but not the kind that stirs the passions.

As you can see from the mailing above, which was uploaded to the Internet by a rollerblading Fort Worth blogger who makes reference to "incumbent cockroaches," this year is different.

The "controversial Dallas millionaire" wallowing in the mud seems to be hotelier Monty Bennett. Bennett, the Star-Telegram's Bud Kennedy reports, sued the water district over a pipeline that will cut through his East Texas ranch and has funneled $105,000 to the three challengers in the race, John Basham, Mary Kelleher and Timothy Nold. The identity of the child actor isn't exactly clear.

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Tennell Atkins' Opponent In City Council Race Accuses Him of Destroying Her Campaign Signs

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Brenham
Subrina Brenham, the businesswoman challenging Tennell Atkins in the District 8 City Council race, was driving along Lancaster Road this morning when she noticed something odd: One of her campaign signs, the large rectangular variety you see plastered on the sides of buildings and fences, had been cast aside in an open field alongside a heap of other debris.

This was not the first one she had found. "Once I started putting my signs out, my signs started being removed and replaced by Tennell Atkins signs," she said this afternoon. Four of them by her count, at $50 a pop.

The other ones she took in stride, but this one? This was the last straw. She called police. She filed a report. She spoke with Unfair Park.

"I know [Atkins] knows," she said. "This is with his knowledge. He's done this before in other campaigns."

Those are bold accusations. They also happen to reek somewhat of desperation. After all, Atkins had no trouble destroying his opponents in his two contested races, in 2007 and 2009, without resorting to petty crime.

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