Mike Cantrell Is Going to Call for John Wiley Price's Suspension on Tuesday

JohnWileyPriceDISDWFAA.jpg
WFAA
Soon to be taking a little break from the Commissioners Court, if Mike Cantrell's wish comes true.

Mike Cantrell, the lone Republican Dallas County commissioner, has drafted as resolution calling on District Attorney Craig Watkins to go to court to try to suspend fellow Commissioner John Wiley Price with pay until Price's federal bribery case is completed. Cantrell also wants whichever district judge who rules on Prices removal -- they're all Democrats -- to appoint a temporary replacement for Price during his suspension.

Maybe he should have asked for a pony too.

The resolution isn't likely to pass, but it's cheeky. The Dallas Morning News is writing about it, we're writing about, so Cantrell is getting something.

Here are the pertinent bits:

Cantrell says that while he "does recognize the fundamental protection for a person
accused of a crime which requires the government to prove its case against any defendant beyond a reasonable doubt" that it is the commissioners' duty to "consider the severity of the alleged charges made against an individual in relation to the scope of their duties and responsibilities, the impact of the arrest on the county's integrity and public image, and to prevent further harm to Dallas County and ensure citizens that the alleged actions are terminated."

Cantrell says that, despite appearances, the move isn't political.

"Take politics totally out of it, what is in the best interest of the county and what type of example do you set for the employees of Dallas County?" he says. "That's why I'm doing it. Yes, I may not get the votes to make this thing happen, but it's the principle of it. Why do we have a code of ethics if we're not going to follow it?"

Non-elected employees are subject to suspension and termination if they're accused or convicted of a crime, Cantrell reasons, so elected officials should be held for the same standard. He's waited weeks, he says, to propose this resolution because he wanted to give Price time to recuse himself from court actions related to the procurement process. That's not going to happen, so Cantrell decided to move forward.

At the very least, it should make for a fun Tuesday at the usually dull Commissioners Court, which can be watched online here.

Cantrell's Resolution



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17 comments
sbristow15
sbristow15

The Price is wrong, beotch! So much for "Our Man in the Can."

swimonedal
swimonedal

believe me, I'm no fan of JWP, but is this guy going to also ask for Perry's removal as governor until he finishes trial?  What's good for the Democrat is good for the Republican...except Republicans don't see it that way

JFPO
JFPO

So I assume he will call for a "suspension" or the impeachment of Rick Perry since he's all about principle over politics.

fordamist
fordamist

I've used this story before:

LBJ called it 'pissing in a blue wool suit.'

Makes you feel good and warm,  but doesn't help matters any.

Repubs trying to get an edge in November.  They get the four Commissioners on record as not suspending JWP.

JWP's people could give a flip,  it's not gonna get Repubs one more vote in November.

Mikey,  wear Depends,  also.



Catbird
Catbird

price will mobilize his people because Cantrell is white racist...never happen

j.scott.wells
j.scott.wells

Police officers are temporarily suspended from duty when they are investigated. What's the difference?

MaxNoDifference
MaxNoDifference

It looks like Commissioner Price borrowed Rick Perry's glasses while Governor Perry was having his mugshot taken.

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@swimonmedal

As exciting as prosecutorial misconduct for political purposes is to Democrats - it's what gave America the Healthcare Act, after all - it's not a healthy way to run a democracy.

Even Wendy Davis knows this.

noblefurrtexas
noblefurrtexas

@JFPO The charges against Gov. Perry are not for crimes of moral turpitude.  Despite their long sentences if convicted, they are more "civil" crimes.  

Price is accused of crimes that involve dishonesty, deceit, criminal motives. and damage to a number of people and institutions. 

I Do believe that Price should be held to the same standards as county employees.  And, Prices's crimes are federal felonies. 

Bobtex
Bobtex

@j.scott.wells Uh, maybe the difference is that he is an elected official, put into office by the people who voted for him, while police officers are hired and fired by their supervising officers.

andypandy
andypandy

@MaxNoDifference  I own Rick Perry's glasses, I wear Rick Perry's glasses and those, Sir, are no Rick Perry's glasses--they're my ex-girlfriend's/Lisa Loeb glasses!  I have a feeling he may own several cats.

Bobtex
Bobtex

@noblefurrtexas @JFPO Making up your own legal interpretations, are you?  There is no such thing in the Penal Code (or the decisions of the Court of Criminal Appeals) as a "civil crime." The Legislature has defined crimes on the basis of degree of severity, and Perry is charged with the second most serious of felonies, a FIRST DEGREE FELONY. If Perry has violated this criminal statute (as the Legislature, not you, has defined it), then he should be punished like all other first degree felons, for that is what he will be, if convicted:  a felon of the first degree.

noblefurrtexas
noblefurrtexas

@Bobtex @noblefurrtexas @JFPO Reading is fundamental.  I didn't say there WAS such a thing in the Texas Code as a "civil crime", although the courts acknowledge a difference between an armed robbery, and an interpretive infraction by a high elected official.


But, I certain side with Alan Dershowitz, Jonathon Turley, Lanny Davis, and a number of other Democrats who believe the charges don't hold water, and might even be overturned early on.  (Besides, the Grand Jury was seriously tainted.)


The "nature" of crimes varies widely, as I'm sure you know.  Assaulting a federal officer is very different than the equally serious violation of EPA protections of gulley water flows after it rains.  Both are crimes. 


But, I stand corrected in not being more careful about my phrasing.

swimonedal
swimonedal

@noblefurrtexas @Bobtex @JFPO I love how all these Texans and republicans suddenly became legal scholars after Perry got indicted...tainted grand jury (what, it wasn't all Republicans?) moral turpitude? (show me a moral politician)...federal vs state...blah blah blah.. 

noblefurrtexas
noblefurrtexas

@swimonedal It's a miracle. :)


Perry is only the second Texas Governor indicted in all of history.   The last was over 100 years ago. 


Since Texas became a Republican state, roughly kicked off in 1978 with the election of Bill Clements, Austin's very liberal enclave - including increasing Left U.T. faculty, has become an anti-Republican legal machine.  


Great examples of an attempt to indict Sen. John Tower, the indictment of Kay Bailey Hutchison which was overturned, and the indictment of Tom Delay which was eventually overturned on appeal, but which bankrupted him.  There have been other attempts. 


You can look up "moral turpitude" since you don't understand it.  Wiki includes this paragraph in its rather lengthy definition:  "The classification of a crime or other conduct as constituting moral turpitude has significance in several areas of law. First, prior conviction of a crime of moral turpitude (or in some jurisdictions, "moral turpitude conduct", even without a conviction) is considered to have a bearing on the honesty of a witness and might be used for purposes of the impeachment of witnesses.[4] Second, offenses involving moral turpitude may be grounds to deny or revoke state professional licenses such as teaching credentials,[5] licenses to practice law,[6] or other licensed profession."

As you can readily see, you're quite wrong. 

Many of us who aren't lawyers had a couple of sections or more of Business Law.  But, "moral turpitude", as a legal concept, has been around for eons. 

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