Way More Than 2,000 Migrant Kids Are Coming to Dallas, and Way More Are Already Here

Categories: Immigration

ImmigrantKids.jpg
Office of Rep. Henry Cuellar
Some Dallasites are protesting the arrival of 2,000 unaccompanied Central American kids. They're about to get much angrier.
Local protests have increased in recent weeks against the expected influx of thousands of unaccompanied Central American children, part of an unprecedented surge of kids fleeing poverty and violence in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. As resources are stretched at the border, at Lackland Air Force base and other shelters, Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins has proposed, to both criticism and acclaim, that the county house some kids at Hulcy Middle School, Lamar Alternative Education Center, and a Parkland Hospital warehouse.

Not all Dallasites are taking the news well. "We are being invaded. And we cannot afford to take care of these children," said one woman at a recent protest. "For Clay Jenkins to make a decision to invite the illegal immigrants to come to Dallas is completely unacceptable," said another.

Just how many has he invited? According to basically every media report, it's 2,000. But if some North Texans are alarmed at the idea of 2,000 kids, they should probably know: It will likely be many more.

The shelters Jenkins has proposed will have room for about 2,000 kids. But the federal Office of Refugees and Resettlement, which takes custody of non-Mexican unaccompanied minors at the border, says it reunites children with family or some other sponsor in an average of about 35 days. As long as the surge continues, there's no reason to believe that once a bed empties it won't be filled. And Jenkins has said the shelters will be under a 120-day contract that could be renewed to extend beyond a year. So while the number of beds in Dallas County would be 2,000, the number of kids who occupy could be 10 times that. Their neighbors will never know they're there; despite fears about crime and disease, the kids will basically be in a makeshift jail. But over time there will be many more than 2,000.

That's what's happened at a similar shelter at Lackland, according to Kenneth Wolfe, a Department of Health and Human Services spokesman. That shelter has 1,200 beds but has already seen three times that many kids -- just in the last two months.

Once reunified with family and released from the Dallas County shelter, the kids could go anywhere. But new data shows there's a strong chance they'll wind up in Texas while they await their immigration court hearings. Since January 1, around 4,300 unaccompanied Central American kids have been released from federal custody to reunite with their parents or guardians, or have been assigned to local foster families, in Texas, more than any other state. Scores of these kids are already here in DFW, and have been here for a long time.

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93 comments
Catbird
Catbird

Turning Dallas Red, White and Green.

Threeboys
Threeboys

Does this mean the price of getting my lawn done will go down?

Voot
Voot

That guy over on FrontBurner who won a prestigious award for interviewing a mosquito tells us we should regard them like the Lost Boys of the Sudan. That's a lot of lost boys.


And that still leaves the girls. They can't be Lost Boys of the Sudan. Not built for it.

Anonamouse
Anonamouse

*deep intake of breath* - Nnnnnnnnooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo, reeeeealllly?!

Shocked, I tell you.

tdkisok
tdkisok

If these kids were Dutch nobody would care.

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@Catbird

It already is, so the area is perfect for placement, no need for "assimilation" on anyone's part.

This existing wave will grow and sustain, it could mean hundreds of thousands of new Dallasites, making it one of the most diverse large Latino cities in the nation, eclipsing even Los Angeles.

JackJett
JackJett

@Voot  That first line had me spitting my first cup O java.  Now I feel I must learn more about a prestigious mosquito and damn the rest of it. 


I thought when I interview the World's Only Singing Psychic I had reached my own pinnacle, however little did I know there was a mosquito of interest.

DavidRoot
DavidRoot

@Voot 

It's hard to compare anything with the horrors in Sudan. But in both cases tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors crossed multiple international borders looking for help. In Sudan far fewer girls were able to avoid being kidnapped or killed. I suppose that's the silver lining for Central America?

wcvemail
wcvemail

@tdkisok

But the answer to the question, how did they get here?, would be available from the U.S. government.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

@TheRuddSki I live in a neighborhood where white is super minority, mostly hispanic and asian.  The pay black guys to mow their yards.  A mow, bag and edge goes for $20.  This has nothing to do with anything, just an observation

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@DavidRoot @Voot Sudanese girls fleeing sex persecution is a qualified reason under refugee status.  Economic reasons are not.

You know this.  You also know this system will collapse under the weight of 7 billion people if we do not control our borders.

It would be national suicide to relax border enforcement to the extent we take in all who just walk in.

I've traveled over most of this planet.  I've traveled through quite a few 2nd and 3rd world countries.  You really do not know what you are talking about.  It would be very easy for us to be overwhelmed.   You have no idea the scale of the problem.  

And you have absolutely no idea or appreciation of at what point in this onslaught your mind WILL change on this subject.

At some point along the time line, self preservation will motivate you to re-examine your assumptions.

Why don't you just take my word for it if you do not want to go see for yourself.

How the current humanitarian crisis is being framed in the media is not what is directly threatening us.  But that does not change the reality of what threatens us.

tdkisok
tdkisok

@wcvemail 


What does it matter how they got here? They are here.  

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@ScottsMerkin

The guys who mow my lawn look like the cast of Duck Dynasty, fwiw

DavidRoot
DavidRoot

@holmantx You're right, no humanitarian situation is exactly alike. There is precedence for the UNHCR assigning the refugee label for economic emergencies (famine is often seen as an economic or political problem when food is available but prices are too high). Even more precedence exists for threats of physical violence, which are shown to have happened in thousands of recent cases already (the UNHCR has quite a bit of experience in so-called "third world" countries themselves). 


I agree with maintaining strong borders. Most people who cross illegally will have to be returned, that's inevitable. The US has over 60 years of experience handling large numbers of refugees and asylees, I think we'll figure out how to fulfill our domestic and international obligations humanely.

wcvemail
wcvemail

@scottindallas 

"meddling in their gov'ts, running para-militaries and support of autocrats"

I believe that's a reasonable argument in favor of U.S. help of some kind, which point has been made just a couple of times before in context (as opposed to the doctrinaire left tactic of throwing all things U.S.-evil into the omelet pan to justify all things.) I do NOT believe that's an argument in favor of open borders, rather, a re-thinking of the whys and hows of U.S. aid.

wcvemail
wcvemail

@tdkisok @wcvemail

I'll play it straight with you. It matters how they got here because the same, unknown way could be used to smuggle in people who would harm the U.S., from terrorists on the large scale to burglars or muggers on the personal side. It matters because we the citizens have invested billions of dollars in border protection and citizenship criteria that have apparently been for naught. 

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

@TheRuddSki I need someone to trim my dead Palm Tree fronds.  Those things are a bitch 

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@DavidRoot @holmantx

Glad to see we agree on repatriation.  Now all we have to agree on is the judicious use involving ourselves in countries overseas.  Maybe we can start with this concept:

Treat the decision to involve ourselves in other countries domestic humanitarian crises with the same judiciousness as the Left views deploying our military in other countries.

Or, what would (not Jesus but) China do?

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@scottindallas

maybe we should stop meddling in their gov'ts???

These "governments" are criminal cartels responsible for quite a bit that affects our country. I say pull our people from the Muslim lands and have them 'meddle" with the cartels.

Then all the refugees can go back, build that shining house on the hill, grateful to the Americans for stomping the shit out of scumbags.

Voot
Voot

@Voot @DavidRoot @scottindallas @holmantx

There's good money to be made in trafficking in these children all the way around, from initially exporting them from their home countries to representing them legally to finally settling and maintaining them in the U.S. KERA's Krys Boyd is even going to skim a little of the cream herself by having celebrity illegal alien Jose Antonio Vargas on today to talk about the kids and drive KERA fund raising, big salary and operational bucks by anybody's standards.

So here's my question: where's MY cut of this profitable river of tender young human flesh?

tdkisok
tdkisok

@wcvemail 


Sheeeet, if you really think think this is about "border security" then you are as big as an idiot as 'ol Ruddy.


It's about the color of these kids' skin. Caucasian please.... 

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@ScottsMerkin

Palm trees host a wonderfully diverse bunch of critters, none of them particularly beneficial.

But now I'm reading of killer bacteria in my Sarasota waters. WTF?

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@TheCredibleHulk

They see me praying for them, on my prayer rug. They seem to mow a lot faster then.

DavidRoot
DavidRoot

@holmantx @DavidRoot 

Voluntary repatriation is one of the UN's durable solutions for handling refugees. Of course people should go home if they can. But I disagree that accepting refugees is an affront to other nations' sovereignty. The US govt gets to decide who is allowed to stay in its borders regardless of how they get here.

By the way, China accepts asylees and refugees. They even have refugee camps set up for Burmese and IDPs.

I also just wanted to confirm that the UN is calling for the US to treat some of them as refugees. Or at least to follow our own laws:

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/un-pushes-migrants-be-called-refugees


http://www.unhcrwashington.org/sites/default/files/1_UAC_UNHCR%20Statement%20for%20the%20Record_HJC%20Hearing%20on%20UACs.pdf

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@holmantx

Reportedly, Americans are baking the blood of immigrants into their bread.

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@voot

So here's my question: where's MY cut of this profitable river of tender young human flesh?

Go to any refugee camp, tell them you are there to pick up your children, and select a few. No photo ID required.

Voot
Voot

@tdkisok  It's usually foolish to blindly assume that the things that intimidate you intimidate everyone else. Not everyone jumps on a chair and screams when they see a spider or when someone cries "Racist!".

wcvemail
wcvemail

@tdkisok

So much for playing it straight with you and giving a straight answer -- you're only intellectually capable of calling names and attributing everything to racism. Have a nice day working the fryer, mono-mind.

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@tdkisok

You are right, son. Immigration now is based on ethnic (color to you) considerations, not law.

That's how racists like you are manipulated, you can't object to anything if the issue is framed as racial, you're just one of the nations laughable, malleable, ignorant tools.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

@TheRuddSki Sarasota? were you on the beach when that plane made an emergency beach landing

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@DavidRoot @holmantx

We already accept more refugees than all other countries on the planet, combined.  Our resources are finite.  There are 138 thug nations in the UN whose motives Americans do not fully trust when it comes to US sovereignty and our ability to continue as a nation.  The Cartels may also have a hand in this calamity.  Central America derives much of their GDP through remittances.  Our President, as well as some citizens typified by previous posts, think it's our fault.  There appears to be considerable malice in the majority of the advice we are getting from the UN to our President.  

Seriously, you are way off and out into the tall grass by quoting what does the UN want us to do.  

And I think you know this.  I think you are being disingenuous when you confine your investigation solely to shore up a conclusion you have already made.

In other words, rational minds can only conclude that we can and will be overwhelmed if we dither.

Why would you want to risk a partial collapse of the society that has created the reason why millions seek to resettle here?

Why do you throw caution to the wind?


TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@DavidRoot

Una propuesta modesta.

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@ScottsMerkin

Nope, not in FL now.

This bacteria killed people last year, when I was swimming with various wounds, never heard a thing about it. All Gulf states affected.

It hits when the water is my favorite temp - hot.

End times can really suck.

DavidRoot
DavidRoot

@holmantx @DavidRoot 

I like that you give me the benefit of the doubt, holman! But I do sincerely credit the UN for their work with refugees. And I do believe the US has shown that it has to resources to support refugees, most of whom end up creating value for the rest of society (there are many strong arguments supporting this).

The UN created the laws that govern refugees. The UNHCR is the primary agency for handling refugees. The UN's experience coordinating most of the world's humanitarian and complex emergencies makes them highly credible. The US signed the UN Conventions and treaties decades ago and has abided by them for the most part.  It's not strange to cite the UN in matters concerning refugees. They are actually the first place to look for guidance.


Are you arguing that among the people coming from Central America recently none qualify for asylee status? Or that the US should discontinue its resettlement programs?

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@holmantx

The Cartels may also have a hand in this calamity.

That's why Obama felt compelled to meet with them recently, so I think you can expect the flow of immigration and assimilation to increase.

JackJett
JackJett

@DavidRoot ....David, once you can get yourself untangled from your underwear, I would like to hear your insight as to what should be done for the people of Palestine?

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@DavidRoot @holmantx

We ARE the UN.

Every nation must decide what's in their best interest with regard to its sovereignty and borders - not the UN initiatives.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@TheRuddSki

I think young Mr. Root has thoroughly entangled himself in his own underwear, as they say.

It is useless for sheep to pass resolutions in favor of vegetarianism while wolves remain of a different opinion. - William Ralph Inge

DavidRoot
DavidRoot

@JackJett @DavidRoot The US has taken a limited number of Palestinian refugees. I am all for doing things case-by-case. Unfortunately there's not much we can do in Palestine without permission from Palestine (and Israel). 

The UN remains the only body that can coordinate status decisions for people who have crossed two or more borders without prior documentation.

Wait, is this analogous to the US/Mexico border crisis somehow?

DavidRoot
DavidRoot

@holmantx 

We are permanent voting members of the UN Security Council. But the US (and the rest of the UN) has agreed to give autonomy to UN agencies to do their jobs, UNHCR among them. 

Enforceable or not though, the US would be breaking international laws, conventions, and treaties that it agreed to by failing to meet due diligence in asylum cases. Due diligence means a fair hearing with an immigration judge. 

Ultimately I agree with you that the US doesn't have to (and many times hasn't) followed international law. It wouldn't be the first time it ignored legitimate claims for asylum.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@DavidRoot @holmantx

Again, not if (by action or inaction) it is not in our best interests (the National Interest) to either enforce or not follow any agreement, treaty, law or directive not emanating from directly the Congress and signed by the President, who represent the National Will of the People who direct them.

I do not know how to make it any clearer to you.

That you demand to wallow in a linguistic torture chamber which allows you to conclude the United States is, at its core, treating the central americans who are suddenly bolting across our borders in record numbers inhumanely by clearly demonstrating to those not yet in the pipeline they will be immediately repatriated . . . 

is a personal problem.  

I can only conclude you are not thinking clearly.  You don't want to grasp, or cannot grasp, the elements of supply and demand that are in play, and what is at stake.

I can only assure you that we are a generous people and that in order to remain so, we must recognize two things:

Our resources are finite, and;

why did this happen?

And I think you know why.

DavidRoot
DavidRoot

@holmantx @DavidRoot 

The US agrees to resettle tens of thousands of people every year. When someone is being threatened, it's always in a country's best interests to offer assistance when it can. I emphatically believe the US has more than enough capacity to accept the current number of legitimate asylum seekers. 

The US has accepted a lot of their asylum applications already. Most of the immigration judges are following the law. None of what's happening now is entirely unprecedented. My view is not at all fringe.

dingo
dingo

@DavidRoot @holmantx 

"I emphatically believe the US has more than enough capacity to accept the current number of legitimate asylum seekers. "

That half-truth is ignoring the overriding significance of the complete picture and is therefore hardly relevant.

"Due to the volatile nature of this program, the Administration is not able to reliably predict the number of UAC who will arrive in FY 2015 at this time."

http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-Texas/2014/07/29/Feds-Admit-They-Have-No-Clue-How-Many-Illegals-Will-Arrive-Next-Year

DavidRoot
DavidRoot

@dingo @DavidRoot @holmantx 

Dingo, at least you give me credit for half of the truth.  =^)


Lord, I have personal experience working with HHS, they mean business. So, I'll say again, I partially agree with holman when he says this is a really big mess that's hard to clean up. But I have no doubt that the US will do the right thing (eventually). In the meantime a lot of people will suffer. And that makes me genuinely sad.

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