Fort Worth's Not Sure Its Lawns Could Take Permanent Twice-a-Week Watering

Categories: The Environment

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In the two years since the Dallas City Council made twice-per-week watering restrictions permanent the water situation in North Texas hasn't improved much. We're still in severe drought, lake levels are still low and long-term projections of drought and population growth still aren't pretty. A slightly less verdant lawn seems a small concession.

Not in Fort Worth, where the City Council on Tuesday tabled a proposal to implement permanent twice-weekly watering restrictions, five of the body's nine members having "suddenly gone weak in the knees," in the words of the Star-Telegram's chiding editorial.

See also: Dallas Passes Twice-a-Week Watering Restrictions; Watering Can Stocks to Soar?

Wobbly kneed probably isn't the best phrase to describe Fort Worth council member Jungus Jordan who, in an interview with KERA before Tuesday's meeting, seemed willing to suck Texas dry if that's what it takes for his constituents to water their lawns as they please.

"Water is one of those requirements that government has to provide to our citizens, and in that role, we have a responsibility to make sure we're doing the right thing with our infrastructure to make that water available, and at the lowest prices possible, with the minimal impact on our citizens' lives," Jordan said.

He thinks Fort Worth should work on fixing leaking pipelines instead of telling residents when and how often they can water.

The Fort Worth City Council will revisit the proposal at its meeting next week.


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20 comments
TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

Where I presently reside, gravel lawns are quite prevalent for several reasons - water is quite expensive, many lawns are UN-mowable due to steepness, there is quite a lot of sun-blocking forest, the maintenance is negligible, and they really are quite attractive.

As the a West becomes more populated and water becomes the New Oil, this will become the norm.

Depending on how progressive towns and HOA's are concerning code, of course, but necessity will trump attachment to last-century norms.

lecterman
lecterman

But..but Scot from Scott's told me to feed my lawn....FEED IT!

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

Make even the privately-held belief, much less the stated and exhibited practice of traditional grass lawns a thought crime against the xeriscaping or gravel-lawned community.

And if someone dare express or practices traditional lawning preference, drive them from the public square, get them fired - whatever it takes.

Only then will people be forced to alter their wrong thoughts and practices which harm the Gaia Community.

Anon.
Anon.

Jungus is a twit. 

kergo1spaceship
kergo1spaceship

I've given up on my lawn as of two years ago; I'm fittin' to do a desertscape.....and I'm not kidding; you do the research like we did online!


Seriously though, Lake Lavon has risen, like, 5 feet tonight........Imma waste water like the Osmonds. 


Nothing trumps Redsox and Patriots games like a tornado, where do I sign up?

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

In Tarrant County fracking consumed 2.8 billion gallons in 2011.

Fort Worth used an average 6.8 billion gallons on their lawns in that same year.

Texans consumed 18 times more water in keeping their grass green than the industry used in frac jobs in 2011.

casiepierce
casiepierce

Is this asshole originally from Dallas?

maroon9991
maroon9991

@TheRuddSki

                    What a patriot. Where the common man sees but sensible steps to limit waste of a VITAL natural resource, you sniff out a conspiracy against the aesthetic and property rights of every red-blooded, free-born Texan.   A bold defender of individual liberties, you are.

A-nony-mouse
A-nony-mouse

@holmantx The big difference being that water used on lawns stays in the local water cycle, while water used in fracking is removed from the local water cycle.


Still, watering lawns does waste a lot of water.

Sharon_Moreanus
Sharon_Moreanus topcommenter

Nope.

Start here..golf courses, water parks

Check who the largest water users are..you will be amazed.

IT in Richardson is a whore.

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@ScottsMerkin

The one responsible for all the dead spots in Scott's own lawn.

TheRuddSki
TheRuddSki topcommenter

@maroon9991

Ah, if my diatribe were that simple.

Check yesterday's national news, or the exhultant glaadness on the morning news shows today.

And you'll see we are in total agreement, my suggestion borders on fascist suggestion.

kergo1spaceship
kergo1spaceship

@Sharon_Moreanus  


don't forget Jerra Jones and Tom Hicks; rumor has it, they leave the faucet on, and LAUGH manically!?  Oh the humanity.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@A-nony-mouse  

On a scale of the hierarchy of needs, a clean energy source is as vital to humanity as is water.

Particularly when there are 7 Billion of us presently upright on the planet, and 2/3rds of it is covered by water.

A-nony-mouse
A-nony-mouse

Which part doesn't? Watering lawns? or the removed for the local water cycle? Both are true.

I've seen numbers saying that somewhere between 40% and 80% of water used in fracking is not recycled and is placed in deep injection wells, effectively removing it from the local water cycle. But please note that I said "local", as in it is not returned to local aquifers, rivers or lakes. The natural gas produced by fracking, when burned, can produce water vapor which returns water to the global water cycle eventually, but that is not at a fast enough rate to offset the local use.


Still, as you so ably pointed out, fracking only uses a small portion of the local water supply on a day-to-day basis.

Lake Lavon isn't only at 48.3% of full capacity because of fracking.


And fracking might buy some grey and industrial water, but a lot of it comes from the same sources as our drinking water: wells for groundwater and surface water like rivers and lakes.

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