Here's Where Dallas' Uninsured Live

Categories: Healthcare

DallasUninsuredHeatMap.jpg
kevinjohnson.org
A significant chunk of America's uninsured population lives in Texas, and a lot of those people live in the Dallas area. That's partly because Texas refused to expand Medicaid, which has left a million-plus people too rich to qualify for government insurance but too poor to get subsidies to buy private plans. Other factors adding to the problem are illegal immigration and a complex stew of demographics, economics and politics that mean the state will continue to have a large number of uninsured even after the Affordable Care Act's March 31 deadline for buying insurance.

So get used to the map above, which was compiled by a Georgia Tech health systems grad student named Kevin Johnson. Johnson took data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2012 American Community Survey and turned them into heat maps showing the distribution of the uninsured population in each of the 15 largest U.S. cities.

See also: Dallas Named One of America's Worst Counties for Health Coverage

The Dallas map generally confirms what one would imagine: the Park Cities and prosperous North Dallas form a pool of deep blue, much of southern Dallas, the Bachman Lake area, the sea of apartments on the far side of Lake Highlands all trending yellow. The only potential area of surprise is the big yellow splotch that's eaten east Plano.

Send your story tips to the author, Eric Nicholson.


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133 comments
ruddski
ruddski

Myrna pasted a typical obfuscate ry WaPo excuse below. This one sentence is classic:

".If Republicans took their newfound concern for (some) people’s access to health care and used it to actually work to make the law work as well as possible, millions more might be helped as well. If only."

what they're saying is that Republicans should somehow do what Obama and Democrats have been unable to do - get the people who demanded the law to sign up.

ruddski
ruddski

With this O'Care fiasco, it appears that it's all tremendously wonderful for those with the need, but the assholes with the ability just aren't co-operating.

markzero
markzero

 That's partly because Texas refused to expand Medicaid, which has left a million-plus people too rich to qualify for government insurance but too poor to get subsidies to buy private plans.


You can be too poor for government insurance, actually.

Sammee
Sammee

West Plano looks down on East Plano and Plano (and CoCo) as a whole tends to look down on Dallas County, which is paying for their uninsured.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

Republicans may well get political benefit from the issue in this year’s election, particularly if Democrats continue to do such a weak job of defending the law. But that doesn’t really matter in the long run. The law isn’t going to be repealed, something Republicans know as well as Democrats. For all its complications and the difficulty of implementation, the ACA has already done an extraordinary amount of good for those millions of people. If Republicans took their newfound concern for (some) people’s access to health care and used it to actually work to make the law work as well as possible, millions more might be helped as well. If only.---Washington Post, 3.18.2014

juanmayeaux
juanmayeaux

East Plano is full of Latinos and other working poor who have no intention of getting insured because they like Parkland. Expanding Medicaid is just going to funnel more people into the already crowded Parkland and the dwindling number of primary care Doctors who will see them.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

If the President doesn't suck it up and employ the whip hand on his Youth and Poor vote, his signature legislation will fall under the wheels of a Republican administration and super majority.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@Sammee East Plano has some cool places.  Demographically, it is not as affluent as West Plano. That is a fact, although there are some areas that are picking up.


I'm not sure that is looking down on them.


The only thing people I know look down on Dallas for is DISD.

ruddski
ruddski

@Myrna

"...particularly if Democrats continue to do such a weak job of defending the law."

That sentence should read:

"Particularly if Democrats who demanded the law continue to refuse to participate in the law"

JohnSmallBerries
JohnSmallBerries

@juanmayeaux  incorrect. They will funnel into Richardson Methodist just like they funneled into the same hospital when it was Richardson Regional.

katchalmers
katchalmers

You have it backwards, not expanding Medicaid will funnel more to Parkland. People on Medicaid can go to private doctors that accept it. Most people do not like to use Parkland because it is crowded. Gov Perry choose not to expand because of Obama, if you are a Republican you can not be known that you worked with him on anything even if it means that people would not be able to afford insurance in Tx if you do not have minor children, unemployed or nit old enough to get Medicaid or Medicare

markzero
markzero

@bvckvs sure. And let me clarify first that what I meant was: you can be too poor for any subsidy.Go to the calculator on the Healthcare.gov website and tell it you're a single male without kids, say in your 40s, perhaps. You've been out of work for a year or more, so your expected income is 0. The site will tell you that you don't qualify for any subsidy at all. 


Rick Perry could have agreed to an extension to this group, but he didn't. So some of the poorest of the poor appear to still be left out. They can still apply for insurance, technically, but are probably unlikely to be able to pay the unsubsidized rate.

markzero
markzero

@bvckvs @markzero  That's great news. I think we're getting a little off track here, though: the hole in the system at the bottom. Poor people who can get to Parkland maybe don't have to worry so much, but for everyone else without a similar program?

markzero
markzero

@bvckvs @markzero  Are you talking about through the emergency center, or does Parkland also do regular checkups and other preventative care? What about prescriptions on a continuing basis?


ruddski
ruddski

@Cogito

Dems voted for Iraq because their rhetoric which pre-dated Bush was the same.

They couldn't call themselves liars.

however, as soon as they could declare surrender and screw our forces there they did.

Despicable shits led by the evil Reid.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@bvckvs  You suck at comprehend.

I didn't say I don't know what they are about.  I said I don't suppose to know another person's motives.

You wanna talk ignorance, find me somebody who takes a congressman at his *public* word about why he did something.

Oh wait, I'm talking to one.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

@bvckvs no bucky, your ignorance is a danger, the fact that people might actually listen and believe what you say is dangerous.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@bvckvs  In his defense, paying taxes is about as relevant a statement as whether or not they like pie.

The fact is that they don't contribute to the financial bucket of money used to pay for the entitlement.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@CogitoErgoSum  I don't assume to know other people's motives.  I guess since you are so close with members of Congress, you have personally discussed this with them.  Unfortunately, I don't have that luxury; so I will prefer to stick to the facts of the situation.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum

@PlanoDave @CogitoErgoSum  Just plain intellectually dishonest, then, eh? You know full well why Dems voted for Iraq -- fabricated evidence of WMD. Then it was whitewashed, i.e. "Mission Accomplished" as a liberation. Bush's administration championed both of these wars and the Congress fell into lockstep at the risk of looking unpatriotic or like Muslim sympathizers, to use the anti-Muslim rhetoric of the day.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@becoolerifyoudid I always thought that Plan D is a quirk.  A republican social give away that was actually fought by a lot of Dems to deny the president a victory.

It would up costing a lot more than originally predicted.  No way that could happen with the ACA, though, right?

becoolerifyoudid
becoolerifyoudid

@PlanoDave @becoolerifyoudid I was trying to respond to Cogito's knocking of Bush while failing to see that he was responsible for a large entitlement program for prescription drugs.


But your point is well taken.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@CogitoErgoSum  You really need to go sit at the children's table if you can't keep up with adult conversations.

But, to respond to something that you think I said, but I didn't...

Democrats voted for Iraq and Afghanistan.  No Republicans voted for ACA.

See the difference there?

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum

@PlanoDave @Myrna.Minkoff-Katz  In your bubble, perhaps. Bush got us mired in two decade-long wars that killed thousands of Americans -- and you're comparing that to an attempt to bring healthcare to millions of uninsured. For shame.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz  If ACA is such a popular winner, why are Dems up for reelection running away from it, and from Obama?  He is as popular on the campaign trail as President Bush was 5 years ago and the ACA is a vote loser.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz And the Republican controlled Senate passes it over her veto with 5 Democrats who want to keep their seats voting with the Republicans.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@ScottsMerkin @holmantx @bvckvs @juanmayeaux  

The Poor do not pay the kind of taxes that go toward Obamacare.  Nor do they even bother to sign up, as indicated above, since it's not insurance and they cannot be denied coverage.  Even they recognize it as an entitlement.  So why pay any monies at all?

The White House is reporting 5 million have signed up but the country is now like Putin - he's a Prankster and we laugh.  Or more like the machinations of Baghdad Bob.

The New York Times reported last month, as much as 20 percent of all those enrolled had not actually paid their premiums, meaning they were not covered by the program. CNBC reported last week Maryland reports only 54 percent have paid.  The odds that this system can sustain itself without mandating vast increases in rates for those who do pay are getting slimmer every day.

What has become clear is that the effort to convince young and healthy Americans to sign up for insurance that is both expensive and not something they may need is a failure. Though many of those who clearly benefit from the new health law, such as the poor and those with pre-existing conditions, have signed up, the scheme requires large numbers of those who won’t need the coverage as often in order to be economically viable. 

Many of those purchasing the insurance may be first-time buyers and not understand that they must pay their bill before coverage starts rather than long after the fact, as they can with a credit card transaction.  Some enrolled with no intention of paying or thinking that the hype about the glories of ObamaCare they’ve heard in the mainstream media and from the president absolved them of the obligation to pay for it. The large number of non-payments renders the enrollment figures meaningless and ensures that the rates for those who do pay are going up next year by percentages that will shock them.

Non-payment of premiums makes the President's enrollment numbers assertion a colossal fraud.  Potempkin figures.

He has no choice but to employ the whip hand before he leaves office, or the next Congress will certainly repeal it.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum  

You speak like it is some rural agricultural program when it slices through the fabric of American Life.

It is a Nuclear Bomb.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum

@RTGolden1 @CogitoErgoSum @holmantx @bvckvs  "There are many out there who, up to now, had employer healthcare, no longer do ..." How many? Not as many as you think, I suspect. This is an oft-used anti-ACA scare tactic. The CBO predicts 7 million by 2019, so far fewer as of now.


Are there problems with this program? Absolutely. Should that surprise anyone? Not at all, considering how large of a scope we're talking and the resistance from the obstructionists. As I've said before, I doubt other major social programs went as predicted right from the start. It certainly has become a great mid-term political football for Republicans.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@sec4040 @holmantx @bvckvs  

Reality has intercepted the best of intentions however; it is easy for the Left to dodge our responsibilities, but they cannot dodge the consequences of dodging our responsibilities.  And in the big scheme of things, it didn't take long.

“Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” Philip K. Dick (1928–82), U.S. science fiction writer. Definition given in 1972. Quoted by Dick in: I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon, “How to Build a Universe That Doesn't Fall Apart Two Days Later,” Introduction (1986).

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz @PlanoDaveNo, it's not Medicare or Medicare Advantage.  

""It's a little early for anyone to know how widespread and deep this problem is," said California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones. "There are a lot of economic incentives for health insurers to narrow their networks, but if they go too far, people won't have access to care. Network adequacy will be a big issue in 2014." -LA Times


These are young people, on exchange plans in CA, going to their previous doctors and finding out that their insurance carriers have cut providers out of networks to lower the carriers' costs, while maintaining artificially high premiums.

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum @holmantx@bvckvsI think you're speaking too far out of your realm of contact.  Maybe the average upper middle class family can ignore ACA and its consequences. the mid- to lower-middle class cannot ignore it, nor can we afford it.  There are many out there who, up to now, had employer healthcare, no longer do, cannot afford individual plans and make too much to qualify for Exchange plans (that's my boat.)  Where do we go?

What ACA did was not bring healthcare access to millions of people, it mandated millions of customers for the health insurance industry.  Period.  I don't think it needs to be repealed, but I also think what we got is a lot different than the bullshit we were fed by the administration (as their backpedaling and extensions on mandates clearly illustrate).

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz  Well, that is another point.  Of the 6 million who have signed up, a large percentage have signed up for expanded Medicare.

Fact is, the numbers being released (by both sides) are being released to make a point and don't lend themselves to intelligent analysis of the situation.  The only partially clear points seem to be:

1.  Not enough of the young, healthy uninsured are signing up to offset costs. 

2.  Overall enrollment is not what it needs to be

3.  Previously uninsured are not even half of the enrollment 

4.  People don't seem to understand that they have to pay the premium before they are actually covered.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz  That is entirely possible.  It is inaccurate to claim that 6 million people who were previously uninsured are now insured, however.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

@PlanoDave  I'll lay odds that was Medicare Advantage, not traditional Medicare.  Advantage is carried through private insurance companies, sucks, and few doctors accept it.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz The reported numbers are that fewer than 1/2 million of the individuals who have signed up for the ACA were previously uninsured.  There also seems to be some evidence that those individuals have yet to pay for any premiums.


PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@CogitoErgoSum  I never said they would leave the industry.

My primary care doctor stopped taking Medicare patients 8 years ago.  Surely you are aware that doctors don't have to accept every insurance policy, right?  Just because you have insurance is no guarantee that you get to see a particular doctor.  Graduating Doctors have been avoiding primary care careers for years.  The trend will get worse and those in Primary Care absolutely have the choice as to which patients they will see.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum

@PlanoDave @Myrna.Minkoff-Katz  So, you're saying that doctors will leave the industry like rats from a sinking ship because they will be less likely to earn in the top 1%, but still in the top 10%? Pure conjecture.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@ScottsMerkin  I had a cat in college that would stick to the drapes or furniture if you threw it at them.  Sucker had the longest claws I have ever seen.  We called him "Velcro".  Crazy ass cat.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz  You people?  I am more than one person now?

If you are denying that a demand side fix will fail, present your arguement.  From a purely economic perspective, ACA is set up to fail.  The supply (number of doctors) is fixed and has flexibility.  The demand (people with insurance coverage) has just gone up and they do not enjoy the ability of being able to respond to price elasticity.

Flash back to Economics 301, what happens when demand goes up and supply is held constant?

Now add in the fact that the new consumers will not have the ability to respond to pricing changes.  What will the suppliers most likely economic response be?  (Hint:  it's not to lower prices and see more people at lower margins)

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@bvckvs Like every Dem campaigned against Bush 6 years ago?  You're right.  That sucked.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

@holmantx  You really hate the fact that six million uninsured American citizens are now covered and can get the care they need.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz  What millions?  It's not insurance.  It is an entitlement for the poor and the youth and those with pre-existing conditions, and the first two categories aren't signing up.  And those that are, aren't making the first premium payment to activate the coverage.  Why?  Because they cannot be denied coverage when they show up at Parkland.

Get it?  Hello?

The zeppelin is afire and nosing in.  Oh the agony I can't watch!

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum @holmantx @bvckvs  The monkey's on the Democrat's back.  Obamacare has failed.  The poor and the youth aren't signing up and those that are forced into the line up and sign up mandate are caught in a "middle class squeeze".  It cost a lot more for a lot less coverage.  

That's why the Dems are running for the tall grass and the Liberal pundits are beginning to see this thing could precipitate a slate wiping WAVE ELECTION.  

In fact it's worse than Iraq because its impact is far more widespread and it's personal.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

Obamacare is here to stay.  No one will rip it away from the millions who have gone from uninsured to insured.  It's a lose-lose propaganda tool for the Republicans.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum

@holmantx @bvckvs  "It's the economy, stupid," didn't work for Mittens. It will only work if the Republicans change their message (hint: not "We Built It") and choose a worthwhile candidate. Obamacare is not causing enough pain to the average American family, many of whom regard it as a curiosity they can ignore. This is largely a Bullshit Mountain (Fox News) talking point, i.e. anti-Obama rhetoric, that his opponents have taken up.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

@bvckvs  man you are dense pretty sure the whole democratic party ran on the platform of "Lets vote out all the Bush republican cronies" when he wasnt running anymore.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

@bvckvs  If it’s crucial to remember that “it’s the economy, Stupid,” as James Carville famously suggested in the mantra he wrote for Bill Clinton three presidents ago, it’s difficult to see how the outlook will get much brighter this year for the Democrats. They can run from Obamacare, but they can’t hide. They voted for it, and nobody else did. “Fix it, don’t repeal it,” and “Mend it, don’t break it,” is thin soup. Republicans tried this once with “Stay the course,” and it didn't work then, either. The long view is never popular with voters. - WesPrudin

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