DallasBlack.Com Keeps Plagiarizing Local News Sites

Categories: Media

DallasBlackPlag.jpg
That's funny....the words are the same.
On Valentine's Day, Dallas police arrested 41-year-old Jacqueline Edwards on suspicion of setting up at least two Craigslist robberies. The news first appeared Tuesday on WFAA's website. An hour later, DallasBlack.com had the story.

Nothing particularly suspicious there. The WFAA story is little more than a summary of a arrest affidavit. Even if the station got the story first, the facts are all publicly available.

The weird thing here is the Dallas Black's piece matches WFAA's word for word. From the all-caps "DALLAS" dateline to the closing line about a "mystery suspect," it's all the same.

Poke around a bit, and you'll find that the Craigslist robber isn't the only story DallasBlack.com has lifted. Here's one about an 18-year-old burglar caught after leaving his wallet behind, also borrowed from WFAA. The Dallas Black story even lists Tanya Eiserer's byline.

Nor is the practice limited to local crime stories. Here's a Dallas Black post on Kanye West collaborating with American Psycho author Bret Easton Ellis. Here's the same story, word-for-word, on MTV.com. This post it took from Radar Online.

This first popped onto my radar maybe a year ago when an Unfair Park story appeared on the site, then a second. The articles were subsequently taken down and I've seen no others, so I stopped paying attention. But while DallasBlack.com may have stopped grabbing stories from the Observer, it's still engaged in the wholesale taking of other journalists' work.

A DallasBlack.com representative -- I was connected to him after asking for the publisher, but he wouldn't give his name -- described this as standard practice.

Some content is produced by DallasBlack.com contributors, he said. "Some stuff, we see something on the Internet that we think people will find of interest and we regurgitate it."

Does DallasBlack.com ever pull down posts in response to copyright claims?

"I don't think I have to answer that question," he said, adding that "if someone did call wanting us to pull us down, yeah we would." (Note: in addition to the Observer, you'll be hard-pressed to find a Morning News story on the site, so Belo's lawyers may have been in touch).

And does the site see any problems with lifting other people's work?

"I totally appreciate you calling," he said. Then, as we asked for his name, click.

It should go without saying, but DallasBlack.com should know better. This isn't some dude in his living room with a personal blog. It's a for-profit media venture that sells ads and everything. It counts 33,000 followers on Facebook and 18,000 on Twitter.

Its parent company, Abstract Concepts Inc., offices in Deep Ellum and is touted on the Deep Ellum Community Association's website as a 15-year-old "interactive marketing firm that develops and markets niche portal websites and marketing-advertising strategies that target the African American and Latino consumer."

Send your story tips to the author, Eric Nicholson.

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23 comments
SweetJaneJones
SweetJaneJones

thats because the owner is only concerned about hits.  he used to not want to post celebrity gossip but I guess he got desperate LOL

lebowski300
lebowski300

My guess: 99.999% of the dallasblack.com readership doesn't care about this damning truth.

Voot
Voot

This story may have longer if more slender legs than you imagine.


There was a time when honoring copyright was sort of a hallmark of the new journalism endeavors everywhere. It was going to be the peoples' journalism, and it wasn't going to be corrupt like the bad old big boys.


Then the new boys started getting bigger and started realizing they could make advertizing cheddar just by slapping it on anything under their control on their server. Plus there was that tech crash, which sort of dampened the party.


So now you have a situation where a lot of the walled gardens are starting to circle the oil tanker back around in the other direction. Plagiarism? Why, putting a stop to that might be akin to shutting down free speech. Particularly if that free plagiarized speech can carry an ad or two on its back until someone absolutely, positively makes them delete the plagiarized article. That might even be worth defending by lawsuit on free speech grounds. And, really, surely you understand they're too big by now to police themselves. So, like the big box store, if you find that price that's higher at the register than on the shelves, and you really, really push them, they might, might correct the situation. But not the other 49 million just like it. Until you complain about the second one. And the third.


All in all, if you can stuff enough stuff on your servers and make money off of every little bit, just like any other syndicate you get big and rich, no matter what the provenance of the goods you trade in. How are you to know what might be stolen and what just fell off a truck?


And once you get big and rich enough, you pretty much get to decide what's copyright and what's plagiarism, or to bankrupt anyone fool enough to try to prove you wrong.

ruddski
ruddski topcommenter

Dunno how legit the site is, there's an article featuring a Latina running off with a white teacher. Bet if you dig deep enough, there's probably something about Clarence Thomas as well.

You want real black, you gotta read this guy

http://themachoresponse.blogspot.com

mcdallas
mcdallas topcommenter

On Valentine's Day, Dallas police arrested 41-year-old Jacqueline Edwards on suspicion of setting up at least two Craigslist robberies. The news first appeared Tuesday on WFAA's website. An hour later, DallasBlack.com had the story.


Nothing particularly suspicious there. The WFAA story is little more than a summary of a arrest affidavit. Even if the station got the story first, the facts are all publicly available.


The weird thing here is the Dallas Black's piece matches WFAA's word for word. From the all-caps "DALLAS" dateline to the closing line about a "mystery suspect," it's all the same.


Poke around a bit, and you'll find that the Craigslist robber isn't the only story DallasBlack.com has lifted. Here's one about an 18-year-old burglar caught after leaving his wallet behind, also borrowed from WFAA. The Dallas Black story even lists Tanya Eiserer's byline.

Nor is the practice limited to local crime stories. Here's a Dallas Black post on Kanye West collaborating with American Psycho author Bret Easton Ellis. Here's the same story, word-for-word, on MTV.comThis post it took from Radar Online.

This first popped onto my radar maybe a year ago when an Unfair Park story appeared on the site, then a second. The articles were subsequently taken down and I've seen no others, so I stopped paying attention. But while DallasBlack.com may have stopped grabbing stories from the Observer, it's still engaged in the wholesale taking of other journalists' work.


A DallasBlack.com representative -- I was connected to him after asking for the publisher, but he wouldn't give his name -- described this as standard practice.

Some content is produced by DallasBlack.com contributors, he said. "Some stuff, we see something on the Internet that we think people will find of interest and we regurgitate it."


Does DallasBlack.com ever pull down posts in response to copyright claims?

"I don't think I have to answer that question," he said, adding that "if someone did call wanting us to pull us down, yeah we would." (Note: in addition to the Observer, you'll be hard-pressed to find a Morning News story on the site, so Belo's lawyers may have been in touch).


And does the site see any problems with lifting other people's work?

"I totally appreciate you calling," he said. Then, as we asked for his name, click.

It should go without saying, but DallasBlack.com should know better. This isn't some dude in his living room with a personal blog. It's a for-profit media venture that sells ads and everything. It counts 33,000 followers on Facebook and 18,000 on Twitter.


Its parent company, Abstract Concepts Inc., offices in Deep Ellum and is touted on the Deep Ellum Community Association's website as a 15-year-old "interactive marketing firm that develops and markets niche portal websites and marketing-advertising strategies that target the African American and Latino consumer."

Send your story tips to the author, Eric Nicholson.

TexMarine
TexMarine

We'll know for sure when this article appears on their site.

dingo
dingo

"And does the site see any problems with lifting other people's work?"


Maybe Unfair Park will ask that same question the next time they run out a "ASCAP Extorting Local Bar Owner" headline.

Mervis_Earl
Mervis_Earl

"Then, as we asked for hims name, click."

Yeah, don't want gold like that to be stolen.

Montemalone
Montemalone topcommenter

"Some stuff, we see something on the Internet that we think people will find of interest and we regurgitate it."

That sums up a whole lotta things.

P1Gunter
P1Gunter

The irony is you keep sending them clicks when you write about it, making them more money in ads off other people's work.

wcvemail
wcvemail

Before the deluge, I'll say that this doesn't seem to be a black thing. Rather, it's a 2014-stupid-buzzword-flinging-lazy-uneducated-marketing-is-easy thing. Emphasis is on "stupid."

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

@monstruss @CogitoErgoSum  I regurgitated a gallon of low level tequila the other day.  Bday parties in your 30's are not as easily recovered from as those in your early 20's

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