A Dallas-Area Entrepreneur Is Preemptively Cornering Texas' Legal Marijuana Market

Categories: Weed

ChilloWakesYourGenius.jpg
The website for Cannabis Holdings, a Rockwall entrepreneur's effort to preemptively corner the legal marijuana market in Texas.
Marijuana is still very much illegal in Texas, and, whatever Governor Rick Perry says about "decriminalization", it will remain so for the immediate future.

But the tide of public opinion is turning fast, and it's not so hard to imagine a day when Texas relaxes its weed ban. It almost seems like an inevitability.

That's what Jerry Grisaffi is banking on. "Once the cities and the government start tasting the tax revenue, all the other BS goes away," he says, referring to marijuana regulations in every state that's not Washington or Colorado.

See also: Texas Governor Rick Perry Is Still a Long Way From Legalizing Pot

Grisaffi doesn't know exactly when that domino will fall in Texas, or whether it will be for medical or recreational pot. He just knows he'll have the cannabis market cornered.

Cornering a market that doesn't yet exist would seem to pose an insurmountable challenge, but Grisaffi has a plan. His Dallas-based company, Republic of Texas Brands, is in the process of inking deals to distribute products made from THC-free cannabis (a.k.a. hemp), the idea being that it will have an established supply network for when the hemp can be replaced with actual weed.

First up is Chillo, a hemp-based energy drink emblazoned with a marijuana leaf that Grisaffi envisions competing with Red Bull and Monster. "I don't know what stores [Chillo will be available in locally], but I know they've already been out there pitching." The first shipment, he says, has already sold out.

Down the line, Grisaffi plans to expand to edibles, candy and baked goods and the like. He says he just got a sample shipment of scones and brownies that are potential Republic of Texas offerings and is looking at other marijuana-related revenue streams. He's considering an investment in a California grow farm and may buy a couple of vaping shops or hookah bars that could easily be converted to weed cafes should the opportunity arise.

See also: Why Travel for Colorado Pot When You Can Buy It From Your Friendly Neighborhood Dealer?

Whether speculating on the demand for (and existence of) legal marijuana in Texas pays off, Grisaffi at least hopes this plan fares better than his last, which was to slap a Republic of Texas label on meat, barbecue sauce and vodka.

"We're moving completely away from that," he says. Cannabis is where the money is.

Send your story tips to the author, Eric Nicholson.


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16 comments
issacyesuf
issacyesuf

In the law enforcement community, the major concern is no longer marihuana but the tendency of some users to engage in other irresponsible activity, particularly the use of more dangerous drugs. Official sentiment now seems to be a desire to contain use of the drug as well as the drug subculture, and to minimize its spread to the rest of the youth population. Law enforcement policy, both at the Federal and State levels, implicitly recognizes that elimination is impossible at this time.

The active attempt to suppress all marihuana use has been replaced by an effort to keep it within reasonable bounds. Yet because this policy still reflects a view that marihuana smoking is itself destructive enough to justify punitive action against the user, we believe it is an inappropriate social response.

Marihuana's relative potential for harm to the vast majority of individual users and its actual impact on society does not justify a social policy designed to seek out and firmly punish those who use it. This judgment is based on prevalent, use patterns, on behavior exhibited by the vast majority of users and on our interpretations of existing medical and scientific data. This position also is consistent with the estimate by law enforcement personnel that the elimination of use is unattainable.

In the case of experimental or intermittent use of marihuana, there is room for individual judgment. Some members of our society believe the decision to use marihuana is an immoral decision. However, even during Prohibition, when many people were concerned about the evils associated with excessive use of alcohol, possession for personal use was never outlawed federally and was made illegal in only five States.

Indeed, we suspect that the moral contempt in which some of our citizens hold the marihuana user is related to other behavior or other attitudes assumed to be associated with use of the drug. All of our data suggest that the moral views of the overwhelming majority of marihuana users are in general accord with those of the larger society.

Having previously rejected the approval policy (option number one), we now reject the eliminationist policy (option number two). This policy, if taken seriously, would require a great increase in manpower and resources in order to eliminate the use of a drug which simply does not warrant that kind of attention.

 The Nixon administration did not implement the recommendations from The National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse; and in fact, while the study was pending, Nixon attempted to influence the result by telling Shafer, "You're enough of a pro to know that for you to come out with something that would run counter to what the Congress feels and what the country feels, and what we're planning to do, would make your commission just look bad as hell."[3]

 

 

issacyesuf
issacyesuf

In the law enforcement community, the major concern is no longer marihuana but the tendency of some users to engage in other irresponsible activity, particularly the use of more dangerous drugs. Official sentiment now seems to be a desire to contain use of the drug as well as the drug subculture, and to minimize its spread to the rest of the youth population. Law enforcement policy, both at the Federal and State levels, implicitly recognizes that elimination is impossible at this time.

The active attempt to suppress all marihuana use has been replaced by an effort to keep it within reasonable bounds. Yet because this policy still reflects a view that marihuana smoking is itself destructive enough to justify punitive action against the user, we believe it is an inappropriate social response.

Marihuana's relative potential for harm to the vast majority of individual users and its actual impact on society does not justify a social policy designed to seek out and firmly punish those who use it. This judgment is based on prevalent, use patterns, on behavior exhibited by the vast majority of users and on our interpretations of existing medical and scientific data. This position also is consistent with the estimate by law enforcement personnel that the elimination of use is unattainable.

In the case of experimental or intermittent use of marihuana, there is room for individual judgment. Some members of our society believe the decision to use marihuana is an immoral decision. However, even during Prohibition, when many people were concerned about the evils associated with excessive use of alcohol, possession for personal use was never outlawed federally and was made illegal in only five States.

Indeed, we suspect that the moral contempt in which some of our citizens hold the marihuana user is related to other behavior or other attitudes assumed to be associated with use of the drug. All of our data suggest that the moral views of the overwhelming majority of marihuana users are in general accord with those of the larger society.

Having previously rejected the approval policy (option number one), we now reject the eliminationist policy (option number two). This policy, if taken seriously, would require a great increase in manpower and resources in order to eliminate the use of a drug which simply does not warrant that kind of attention. 

The Nixon administration did not implement the recommendations from The National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse; and in fact, while the study was pending, Nixon attempted to influence the result by telling Shafer, "You're enough of a pro to know that for you to come out with something that would run counter to what the Congress feels and what the country feels, and what we're planning to do, would make your commission just look bad as hell."[3]

  

WTFisWrong
WTFisWrong

This state is missing out on the Tax Dollars from the sale of Marijuana! Millions  going into to the hands of drug dealers and gang controlled criminals while our schools are closed because lack of funds. What are we thinking??? 

Montemalone
Montemalone topcommenter

If Texas decrims, the smoke shop on Fitzhugh, between 2 gay bars, will need to expand.

ruddski
ruddski

Dammit. I used to work with an artist whose label was "Republic of Texas Records", but looking around, it appears he no longer uses that name. There goes our copyright infringement profits. We could have sued for a ton!

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

"I fucking hate Old Jewish white men." ---Ruddski, 11.6.2013  

Mervis_Earl
Mervis_Earl

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul There's already plenty of people smoking weed around here. I don't think the number will go up significantly. You should go ahead and get those Denny's.

ruddski
ruddski

I'd go with a company that delivers from any restaurant. Driving stoned is illegal.

thorshammer1977
thorshammer1977

Funny enough, traffic fatalities have dropped drastically in states where medicinal and recreational marijuana has been decriminalized or legalized. Why? Because the fact is, people are substituting and using mary jane instead of drinking alcohol. Not to mention, a 2006 University of Oregon study showed that not only were the cognitive skills higher in people who were regular smokers of cannabis since their early teens, but they showed no loss in memory and were more calm than those that had never touched it a day in their life. Those factors translate into less road rage, less drunk driving accidents, less reckless driving/speeding incidents/accidents and the list goes on. Now don't get me wrong, I'm not saying go smoke a blunt and go for a stony cruise. People still need to act responsible in regards to using. Eating it raw would be a better option before driving as the alkaloids aren't released from it (which happens when you cook/smoke cannabis) and you will still reap the health and pain relief benefits without getting high.

Frees
Frees

@ruddski  And that has stopped hundreds of thousands of people from driving stoned so far, eh?

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