Dallas Safari Club to Auction Endangered-Rhino Hunt This Weekend, Death Threats Be Damned

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
This weekend, upwards of 45,000 of the world's most passionate big-game hunters will descend on Downtown Dallas for the Dallas Safari Club's annual convention. Only one will walk away with permission from the Namibian government to kill an endangered black rhino.

As DSC Executive Director Ben Carter told us last fall, the auction is intended to help save the black rhino by funneling all proceeds -- expected to be in the high six figures -- into rhino conservation efforts.

A counterintuitive approach to the preservation of a species with an extant wild population of around 4,000, perhaps, but one that is accepted as dogma by many in the hunting community. Conservation requires money, after all, and the guys with guns are often the ones willing to spend it.

See also: The Dallas Safari Club Will Save the Endangered Black Rhino by Auctioning Off the Chance to Shoot One

To the rest of the universe, however, the thought of gunning down a creature as rare and majestic as the black rhino is tantamount to murder.

Most of the opposition to this weekend's auction has come from people like Angela Antonisse-Oxley, who told The Dallas Morning News the hunt is "barbaric" and that she's recruiting opponents to attend a peaceful protest on Saturday.

A few, however, seem to have let their passion for preserving life get the best of them.

"I've had death threats on my family," Carter told the Associated Press. "We've had a number of death threats to our members and (threats about) what would happen if we sell the permit."

Katherine Chaumont, the FBI's local spokeswoman, said the agency is aware of the threats and is reviewing them. "If a violation of federal law is determined, additional action or investigation as necessary will take place."

Undeterred, Carter and the DSC are moving forward with the auction, albeit with heightened security. The long-term viability of the black rhino demands it.

Send your story tips to the author, Eric Nicholson.


Sponsor Content

My Voice Nation Help
73 comments
navylarry51
navylarry51

It is rather like Doublespeak, don't you think? Black is White, Yes is No and Kill an Endangered Black Rhino to Save an Endangered Black Rhino. If the Dallas Safari Club is as concerned about saving endangered Black Rhinos, then they should auction off the hunting permit and then send the money to an Endangered Black Rhino Conservation Group...without killing the Black Rhino. That is what true "Conservationists" should be happy to do. Show your support for the Black Rhino with your wallet, not your gun. But, that is not what is happening. The only way to raise a lot of funds for the Black Rhino, according to the Dallas Safari Club, is to auction off an ill-disguised permit to kill an endangered animal for the highest bidder. I suppose they aren't true "conservationists" as they claim in their literature. I am sure that it will be a "canned" hunt. The rich guy sits in an air-conditioned "blind" while the unlucky Black Rhino is driven within his gun range. A shot rings out, the Black Rhino is dead. Then it's off to the 5 star hotel and drinks for everyone in celebration of the hunter's "prowess."

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

I have a serious question for the people who are against this.


Instead of beating up on the DSC and all of the people who are not against this, why not make your position known to the Namibian government.  After all, they are the ones who are allowing this hunt to occur.  The Namibian government are the ones who have the ability to decide whether or not this hunt occurs.


Has anyone contacted the Namibian Embassy or nearest consulate to find out what the Namibian government's position is on this matter?


Why not convince the Namibian government to not do this.  After all, let's assume that you convince the DSC not to follow through with this auction.  Wouldn't the Namibian government just find someone else?


From a simple Google search:


http://phys.org/news/2014-01-namibia-defends-black-rhino.html

http://www.news.com.au/world/namibia-defends-black-rhino-hunt/story-fndir2ev-1226799448125

It turns out that the Namibian government is auctioning off 5 black rhino hunting permits.


According to these articles, the problem of poaching is very severe in South Africa.

dkjfox
dkjfox

It's shameful what people will do under the heading of "conservation". The key to conservation is through EDUCATION. All I really feel about these people is that they are a group of testosterone filled idiots who have a hidden agenda to make it okay to hunt endangered animals. It's obviously a canned hunt to some degree because the animal is already chosen. What is the sport in that? All so  some idiot can hang the dead carcass on their wall? I can see a lot of solutions that Wildlife Biologists can help this animal through any kind of relocation program. 


Would anyone really want to give money to this group who obviously knows nothing about conservation? Would anyone think that these people would make good decisions on what your money goes to? No thanks, I will proudly give my money to credible conservationist like The World Wildlife Fund, The National Wildlife Federation, and at a local level, Texas Parks and Wildlife. These organizations are about real conservation and education. Obviously not something that qualifies DSF. 


—Burnet, Texas

Sotiredofitall
Sotiredofitall topcommenter

Read the two opposing editorials in today's DMN.   Seems Gordon makes the more valid reasoned argument for his side of the issue.

marks43ap
marks43ap

It makes me mad knowing that people will go into a school and shoot up little kids but the devils that are harming these innocent wild creatures live on.

If you are going to commit suicide - PLEASE GO TO DALLAS AND TAKE THESE SCUM HUNTERS WITH YOU!!!

YOU WILL FOREVER BE MY HERO - AND I'M SURE THOUSANDS OF OTHERS WILL FEEL THE SAME WAY AND REMEMBER YOU WITH LOVE!!!!

And if these hunters think they are going to heaven - sorry, you cannot kill God's creature and then think he is going to accept you into his heavenly kingdom WHEN YOU HAVE THE MIND OF SATAN!!!

joesmom1
joesmom1

There is more money to be made through tourists with cameras (who want to see rhinos whether they are beyond breeding age or not), than via a fat, rich American who is out to feed his inflated ego by killing an animal on the verge of extinction.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

I'm confused now.  I originally thought that this was a novel written by Eugene Ionesco and later made into a movie starring Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder.

wearyat
wearyat

To whomever the highest bidder is, congratulations! You're a pathetic psychopath and just let the world know this about yourself. 

NewsDog
NewsDog

How smart is it to send a death threat to someone who probably owns and knows how use guns?   

DeathBreath
DeathBreath

In the most recent Louis C.K. performance on HBO, he talked about what it would be like if murder were a misdemeanor in this country.  I can tell you, there are many humans I would mount on my living room wall if this became a reality.

Rooster0620
Rooster0620

This thread has been such a disappointment. I thought for sure there would be more animal rights whackos spewing death threats.

Voot
Voot

This is terrible! Can't we just buy him and turn him loose in the White Rock Dog Park?

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

What is interesting is that the Namibian government would probably take out the male rhino in question regardless of what the DSC would or would not do.


The fact that herd management by selective kills is a big part of improving the vitality of the herd.  If one male continues to dominate the breeding process, the genetic diversity of the herd declines quickly and significantly.


By example, I used to manage some farmland/woodlands in E. Texas.  For the deer herd vitality we identified the better bucks in the area.  When we started, the size of the animals was relatively small and the bucks had inferior racks.  After about 10 years of selective culling during hunting season, the dressed weights had increased by about 20% and the inferior racks and spike bucks were gone.

roo_ster
roo_ster

The African countries that allow hunting generally have larger and more robust game animal populations.  The number one example is the elephant.  In a no-hunting country, an elephant is just a dangerous nuisance that destroys crops.  Locals then kill them and do not stop poachers.  In the countries that allow it to be hunted legally and give the locals a cut of the fees, locals have been known to hunt down and kill poachers..who are taking a cut of their livelihood.  

Also, killing an animal is not murder.  

dkjfox
dkjfox

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul

Two wrongs don't make a right. It's just another reason not to give money to DSC, they make poor decisions in the name of "conservation" by giving to a government who obviously is a nightmare. I have sent my protest to credible conservation organizations who can hopefully inform both the DSC and Namibian Government that their ignorance is not acceptable through the backing of a collective group. 


I'm sorry you see people as "beating up" on DSC, from what I am reading, people are trying to fight ignorance. If the DSC sees it as some form of bullying then it shows how truly ignorant they are.


Please send money to Credible Conservationists so they can help educate people what conservation is truly about. Here is a list of organizations that will spend money wisely:


African Wildlife Foundation  http://www.awf.org

World Wildlife Fund  worldwildlife.org/


The Black Rhino is listed as "Critically Endangered".


Rooster0620
Rooster0620

Now. Now.

Take your meds like a good little boy.

There.

Feel better now?

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

@Rooster0620 eh, they are over on the Sea World Southwest airline thread or too busy flaming up the DMN comments about this right now

roo_ster
roo_ster

@VootI was thinking Bishop Arts District, but your proposal is of equal merit.

joesmom1
joesmom1

@roo_ster Then why are more countries banning big game hunting?  Botswana admits they have lost 70% of all animals across the board, and are making much more money catering to ecotourism.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@roo_ster  "The African countries that allow hunting generally have larger and more robust game animal populations." Citation needed.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum 

NatGeo is making the assumption that there is uncontrolled hunting of the species.  This is a false assumption as Namibia has been very successful in preventing black rhino poaching.

doublecheese
doublecheese

@CogitoErgoSum because bigger bucks can be made in the long term by restricting what is done in the short term?  It's called game management, and it's been successfully used all over the world, even here in the USA.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul Also, your deer example is predicated on the belief that a superior deer is larger and has a larger rack. Sounds like a hunter's perspective, alright. Nature would dictate that smaller bucks need less sustenance and are more at harmony with what their ecosystem can support. Long before people were here, nature took care of the deer just fine.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul  

Now that I know what your perspective is, your postings makes sense now.

Please do not force your opinions onto me and I will do the same.

The difference that I see between you and me is that you will not rest until I become a vegan; and, I do not care what you do so long as it is not little children.


PS: "I know this diatribe falls on deaf ears, ..."; for the record I tend to ignore diatribes as they are a common sign of an inflexible, hidebound person who is incapable of learning.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@TheCredibleHulk @CogitoErgoSum @ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul While once it might have been noble, I'd argue the nobility of hunting derived primarily from its "man v. nature" aspect and our ability to create tools that allowed us to subsist on what was available. Because the need for hunting and even eating meat is largely absent in our time and place, the nobility is now gone. What's noble about training a high-powered rifle with a scope -- or even a compound bow with a sight -- on an animal with no defense other than to flee? And this when there are nutritional options available that aren't from the meat of dead animals.

I think I've answered the question as to why, in my opinion, hunting for pure sport is morally indefensible in our time and place. While I don't place animals on equal footing as humans, it seems by several measures they are closer than many would care to admit. We'd like to think they can't feel pain, but in truth, we know the nervous systems of most mammals and avians are capable of sensing pain and respond accordingly to analgesics, as we do.

The sport hunter has no moral leg upon which to stand in this day and age.

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum @TheCredibleHulk @ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul 

Hunting has a noble tradition in human society and although the practice is not strictly necessary to procure meat for (most) modern men, I can appreciate the desire that some people seem to have to continue the tradition. I also respect the fact that although I don't enjoy hunting for sport, some people do, and in a free country we all need to make a little elbow room for people who don't believe exactly like we do.

So, to answer your question, I'll say, yes, the farmer needs his crops, but he also needs the deer population controlled. So then I'll re-ask my original question: Why can't they coexist? The desire of the hunter complements the needs of the farmer quite nicely in my estimation.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul @CogitoErgoSum  There is very little difference between eating wild game killed for sport and eating meat from the store, which is why I eat neither. When one truly examines the ethics of killing and eating other beings -- when non-essential to one's subsistence or security -- the emperor truly has no clothes. It once was essential to our species' existence -- and still is in some parts of the world -- but no longer in this part.

You like the taste? Well, by all means then, that makes it OK. I hear human flesh -- called "long pig" by certain native cultures -- is as succulent and tasty as pork. Care to try? When your nutritional needs easily can be met with plant products, it's indefensible to justify eating meat with "It tastes good."

I know this diatribe falls on deaf ears, but I think the simple ethics of eating meat will result in the most enlightened of societies adopting vegetarianism, not by law at first but because it's the right thing to do. Einstein thought so toward the end of his life. Carl Sagan wisely observed: 

"Humans–who enslave, castrate, experiment on, and fillet other animals–have had an understandable penchant for pretending animals do not feel pain. A sharp distinction between humans and “animals” is essential if we are to bend them to our will, make them work for us, wear them, eat them–without any disquieting tinges of guilt or regret. It is unseemly of us, who often behave so unfeeling toward other animals, to contend that only humans can suffer. The behavior of other animals renders such pretensions specious.They are just too much like us”

TPWD and the people of Texas can figure out other ways to protect the environment, rather than selling tickets allowing them to kill animals for kicks.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul  

Wow!  I just said that I will respect your opinion even though I disagree with you (even though it was a wee bit sarcastic).

I happen to enjoy the taste of a lot of different wild game species.  I especially enjoy the taste of deer.

For me, I truly see no difference in wild game hunting for sport and food; and, going to the grocery store and buying a steak, chicken, pork or lamb.
 

As far as my habitat work went, the diversity and abundance of species when we were done were pretty amazing.  Seeing pileated woodpeckers, bobcat, red tailed hawks, roadrunners, quail, rabbits, fox, dove among other species that were either absent or rare previously on the property was the true reward of all the work that I did.


I suggest that you look at TPWD's budget and revenue summary.  The largest share of TPWD's revenue comes from the sale of game stamps and licenses; and, from a tax on sporting goods.


Here is a link to a copy of TPWD's 2013 report:


http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/pwdpubs/media/pwd_rp_a0900_0679_01_13.pdf

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul @CogitoErgoSum I will do no such thing. Hunting for sport (not subsistence or security) is barbaric and unnecessary in a developed region with adequate food supply and distribution.

The conservation argument that sport hunters have used for years is some cute bs they've trotted out to justify their love for the thrill of killing helpless animals, aka their "birthright" or "heritage." You want to own your heritage the way pioneers did? Go live in Alaska on a homestead. Those days are gone in most of the lower 48. The A&Ps and Piggly Wiggly's made sure of that years ago. 

There are other, less bloody ways to fund conservation efforts. I've lived in this state my whole life and listened to "outdoorsman" like you and Ted Nugent attempt to explain how beneficial their love of killing wild animals is for the animals and the ecosystem. I call bullshit and you've given me no cause to reconsider.

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum @ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul 

So, getting rid of deer because they harm crops is OK, but hunting them for sport is bad?

Why can't those two things coexist, in your estimation? Is it better for the overpop. deer to starve or to feed a hunter?

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul @CogitoErgoSum Nature is a wonderfully self-regulating system. I'm still not convinced that culling by sport hunter is a necessity. Sure, the deer that consume a farmer's crop must be dealt with. But where is the disaster that would happen if hunters didn't kill deer for sport? They would become overabundant, exhaust their food supply and many would die of starvation? That sounds like nature at work. It rebounds -- as after a forest fire. Predators would move in to prey on the deer? Nature again. It is clear to me, Paul, that your idea of "management" is predicated on what is best for sport hunters. The other benefits are byproducts.  

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul

 When we started the deer were below average in weight and size.  When we finished, the deer were above average in weight and size.

We also worked with TPWD on this project and at one point we needed to start harvesting does in order to prevent exceeding the carrying capacity of the land.

We also worked on habitat improvement and had an increase in a variety of wildlife.

I consider it a success when we had regular bobcat tracks as that indicated that the natural predators had returned to the area. 

Your comments to me suggest that you do not have more than a simplistic knowledge of wildlife and land management.

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum @ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul 

Well, that may be true, but now that we have to learn to live together (men and deer, that is), herd management is a reality that we need to learn to live with.

If it so happens that herd management can somehow dovetail with the desires of the hunting public, I find it hard to see this as anything but a win-win scenario.

Neither hunters nor deer are going away anytime soon.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@roo_ster @CogitoErgoSum "Beclown," eh? I like it. Sorry, you make the claim, you back it up with facts, else I doubt you have any.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@doublecheese @CogitoErgoSum I can think of a few reasons, but they'd certainly be dismissed here as sissy, PETA-inspired nonsense. Once upon a time, it was conventional wisdom that the animals were our playthings, to do with as we pleased. We've made some progress, and I'm hoping we will one day agree that killing for the sake of the kill isn't right at all.

doublecheese
doublecheese

@CogitoErgoSum @doublecheese There's no reason they can't do both.  Proper game management (with hunting) helps build healthy populations of animals that would be beneficial to the non-hunting eco-tourism.

Now Trending

Dallas Concert Tickets

Around The Web

From the Vault

 

General

Loading...