Dallas County Pays Mom $350K Over Constable Who Declined to Chase Her Sons' Murderer

NaimMuhammad.jpg
Muhammad
When Naim Rasool Muhammad went on trial this spring for killing his two young sons -- an act for which he was sentenced to death -- local news outlets focused mainly on the brutality of the crime, and understandably so.

Muhammad kidnapped 5-year-old Naim and 3-year-old Elijah in August as their mother walked them to Naim's first day of kindergarten. He took the boys to a creek, where he ordered them to get into the water and "play like y'all swimming," then held their heads under until they drowned. Muhammad told the court he was scared that the boys' mother, Kametra Sampson, would take the boys away from him.

Hanging over that narrative, however, is a big "what if." Sampson, too, had been forced into Muhammed's car, but she jumped out at a red light after spotting a uniformed Dallas County constable. She explained the situation and pleaded for help.

The constable relayed the information to Dallas police, but told Sampson she couldn't follow Muhammad since her car didn't have lights or sirens. Besides, according to The Dallas Morning News, her precinct's policy prohibited high-speed chases.

There's no telling whether the situation would have turned out differently had the constable hopped in her car and pursued Muhammad, but the thought that it might have, and offense at the idea that a uniformed law enforcement officer lacks the authority to offer help in a bona fide emergency, led Sampson to consider a lawsuit against Dallas County.

On Tuesday, Dallas County Commissioners sidestepped that threat, agreeing to pay Sampson $350,000 to settle her claims, according to the Morning News.

"For two young lives, and what we consider to be pain and suffering, we felt that was reasonable," Commissioner John Wiley Price said, according to the paper. It was simply the "right thing to do."

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13 comments
WatchingSouthDetroit
WatchingSouthDetroit

JWP talking about "the right thing to do" is a joke.  "The right thing to do" is to NOT use your elected office to enruch yourself while screwing your constiuents. "The right thing to do" is NOT to have racial quotas - hire the best people for the job who will provide the best service to the taxpayers.  "The right thing to do" is NOT extorting money as a "white tax" to businessmen who are actually trying to invest in south Dallas - see inland port shakedown.  "The right thing to do" is to show respect for others - even when they disagree with you and even if they are not black.  What JWP knows about "The right thing to do" would fit on the head of a pin.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

Aren't Constables paper servers only?  Are they armed?  

Are they on the level of parking enforcement? 

ozonelarryb
ozonelarryb

Name, photo, and badge num of the deppity?

wcvemail
wcvemail

Sadly but unsurprisingly, no mention of policy change for the constables, or training for exceptions, or even acknowledgment of fault for sending uniformed LEOs (?) deceptively into the public.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

2 lives is worth $350k to JWP?  Hmm, there is a joke about a safe and cash somewhere in there but what a disgusting thing to say JWP.   ABSOLUTELY NO amount of money is a reasonable amount to put on a humans life. 

dsmithy3211
dsmithy3211

@ScottsMerkin Seems reasonable to me, and actually somewhat high.  If every life on Earth is valued at $175k, that would amount to something like $1.2 quadrillion (that's $1,200 trillion), which is well beyond the actual wealth on Earth.

Now, if you're saying that monetary awards categorically cannot compensate for the loss of human life, that's another issue altogether.  But how else could you compensate the mother? 

As for how JWP said it, perhaps it was a bit uncouth.  It's likely that it was taken out of context, since he never actually said "$350k is reasonable."  Interestingly, the Dallas News article also adds that JWP added "that taking the case to trial would have cost the county a similar amount."  What he's essentially saying is, setting aside what the mother is entitled to, he'd rather pay the mother $350k than give it to the lawyers as a sunk cost.  Although I'm not sure that makes JWP sound any better.


tdkisok
tdkisok

@ScottsMerkin 


Of course, but in this situation there has to be a number. What do you suggest? And I'm no JWP fan either.


ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

yup and they do speed limit enforcement on 20,30 and 35.  The last time i got pulled over by one, I couldnt find my insurance card.  He said "no worries, Im not here for that, Im here to write speeding tickets." 

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

I surmise that the payment is fine but JWP would have been much better off not giving the quote "For two young lives, and what we consider to be pain and suffering, we felt that was reasonable,"   It just really bothers me that he would publicly say that.  Something more along the lines of, "we've settled the case with family in a mutually agreed upon settlement"  but then again, im not in PR for the commissioners court

Guest
Guest

@ScottsMerkin How about, "Considering everything this young mother has been through, it just seemed like the right thing to do so that she can try her best to move on from this horrible tragedy and begin the healing process.  To the extent the county could help her with that, I'm glad we stepped up and did it."

That would have said what needed to be said without suggesting that $350K was fair-market-value and without admitting that it was a low number.

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