Megapastor Kenneth Copeland, Historian David Barton Team Up With God to Cure PTSD

Categories: Religion

KennethCopelandDavidBarton.jpg
David Barton and Kenneth Copeland agree: PTSD is bull.
Aledo's David Barton was pretty sure he could have become Texas' next Senator, as so many Tea Party leaders were encouraging him to do, but the time wasn't right. "Right now, I believe my role is to continue educating, equipping and inspiring citizens through the work we do at WallBuilders," as he told Glenn Beck.

That appears to be what he was doing on Monday, when he appeared on a special Veteran's Day broadcast of "Believer's Voice of Victory," Fort Worth megachurch pastor Kenneth Copeland's TV show. The subject, naturally, was war, and why American soldiers shouldn't feel bad in fighting in them. They especially shouldn't suffer from post traumatic stress disorder.

"You listen to me," Copeland said, wagging his finger at the camera. "You get rid of that right now. You don't take drugs to get rid of it, it doesn't take psychology; that promise right there will get rid of it."

See also: There's a Measles Outbreak at Vaccine-Denying Pastor Kenneth Copeland's Fort Worth Church

Barton chimes in a few times with affirmations of "that's right," before going on to explain that God has a "faith hall of fame," the Davids and the Gideons whose battlefield prowess shows they have been blessed by God.

Barton and Copeland don't pull their arguments completely out of thin air. They build them on a single line contained in the Book of Numbers in which Moses declares to the Isrealites that those going into battle "shall return, and be guiltless before the Lord."

Substitute American soldiers for the holy warriors of Israel and PTSD for guilt, and the message is crystal clear: If you have PTSD, you're not believing hard enough. So forego secular mental health treatment and open up the Bible. Just remember that the last time Copeland dispensed medical advice, there was a measles outbreak at his church.


Advertisement

My Voice Nation Help
24 comments
MisterMean
MisterMean

Perhaps you should drop the reference to Barton being a historian.  He is not.  He is a religious nut case.

joecook
joecook

This is really dangerous talk, from a medical viewpoint.

bifftannen
bifftannen

How about Copeland curing the measles outbreak in his church before taking on anything else?

JackJett
JackJett

Hot Damn, I'd like to get my nose in that Copeland's man snatch.  I bet he has a fine pair of low hangers that I could make sing AMAZING Grace till his cows come home. 

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

What is the basis for singling out a couple of Christians doing their thing on a religious program?   

ruddski
ruddski

When a preacher urges prayer for problems, things are getting way out of hand.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

T-Baggies should hook up with these two lunatics to carry on their crusade against Obamacare.  Why have health insurance when you have God?

doublecheese
doublecheese

These two make me sick.  They've got no idea what they are talking about.

Their delusions mainly stem from the "prosperity gospel" that they espouse.  The idea that if you obey God and earn his favor, you will be blessed financially and otherwise.  They are taking that idea further here to good mental health.  It's a twisted and damaging perversion of Christian doctrine.  

Oxtail
Oxtail

3 of the last posts by Mr. Nicholson have an anti-religious slant. I guess someone is already starting to feel the Christm.. er uh, Holiday Blues. They should rename this blog, "Unreligious Park."

mavdog
mavdog topcommenter

if God cures mental issues, why do these 2 self-professed believers make such crazy remarks?

oakclifftownie
oakclifftownie

Next up Kenneth  How about you go to the VA in Southern Oak Cliff  and Pray some Limbs back on the Amputees ?

ruddski
ruddski

Then they needn't worry about you.

ruddski
ruddski

I don't know how many combat veterans you know, but religious conviction and prayer are very helpful to many that I know.

ruddski
ruddski

The delusion that prayer can heal is not a perversion of Christian doctrine.

James080
James080

@Oxtail  

In reality, I would not classify this post anti-Christianity. I would classify it anti-charlatans posing as Christians for publicity, profit and political gain. 

doublecheese
doublecheese

@ruddski No, that part isn't at all.  But that you should expect it to based on you believing the right thing, or being right with God, is.

ruddski
ruddski

Reductio ad absurdum. Even doctors support prayer, fool.

casiepierce
casiepierce

@ruddski Yeah. Millions of cancer patients have prayed their way to recovery. Get real.

ruddski
ruddski

Your spiritual belief or non-belief is very likely of little or no interest to UP readers, hon. This is about Americans who matter.

ruddski
ruddski

You're basing your view on Eric's flawed and hostile interpretation of what's being said.

doublecheese
doublecheese

@ruddski I think we are talking past each other here.  The point I'm trying to make is that these guys make it sound like if God's not healing you, it's because of something you aren't believing or doing right, and that it's somehow your fault.

ruddski
ruddski

That's the whole point, believing in prayer - which is not un-Christian.

Now Trending

Dallas Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

General

Loading...