On White Rock Lake, An Architect is Building a House Out of Shipping Containers

PV14House.jpg
PV14house.com
When Google's Street View car rolled by 422 Peavy Road in late 2011, it captured a spacious but ordinary four-bedroom, ranch-style home that was all but indistinguishable from its neighbors.

No more. The structure that's being erected in its place is a strikingly modern, 3,700-square-foot box whose third-story penthouse will afford sweeping views of White Rock Lake. It also happens to be made of shipping containers.

Candy's Dirt first caught wind of the plans back in May. Contacted by Unfair Park at the time, the builder acknowledged the project but declined to give details.

Since then, the house has been given a name -- PV14 -- as well as its own website. The website doesn't go into detail on why architect Matt Mooney, who owns and helped design the home, wanted to build it out of shipping containers other than to say that a "primary goal" was to "design & build a modern residence that has a unique character, responds to its specific location/orientation and employs the construction technologies that are readily available, but not often used in current residential construction."

Plus, shipping container houses are kind of a thing now.

In the end, the why doesn't really matter. The view of White Rock does. And it's a stunning one. Check the video:


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13 comments
angryresident
angryresident

This is a disgraceful and disgusting eyesore upon the classic architecture of Witerock, Lake Highlands, and Lakewood.  Even though it is more Lochwood than any other location, this area is steeped in the history of Dallas and the style is the area dictates that the smaller ranch style homes will be reduced to oddities against absurdities.  This home is atrocious.  I drive by it nearly daily to work, have family and friends that live in the neighborhood, and while the family to occupy it already owns a home in the neighborhood off of Champa Rd, they will not be selling it, rather, they will be turning it into a warehouse for the families apparent obsessive compulsive hoarding I have been told is a problem of theirs.  This property will likely fall into disrepair and to make matters worse there is yet another storage facility in the back of new home to hoard more material.  Two properties in the neighborhood will likely now be ruin for the people around them.  It's almost a spiteful slap in the face to the homeowners that live there and the EXCESSIVE amount of work that has gone on to restore and make these neighborhoods what their former glory was.


I recall seeing the construction and dismissing it at first, assuming it was a green endeavor and the home would then be covered in a stone facade.  While boxes are not aesthetically pleasing given the historic nature of the architecture there, I figured at least the home would be decorated in a period era fashion at least to not impact the home values around it, and itself mind you. Now I drive by it daily and I am told it is complete.  The massive hulk of junk has obvious rust stains where the container has not been treated, the containers still bear the shipping company logos and the serial numbers, the finish is lack luster at best where there some, the rest appears to be a very very rich child's play fort built of junk in some over-sized backyard.


When you consider the better homes in the area, people should both scoff and not try to make nice with such neighbors, as the greatness of that area is now reduced by the eye sore that is PV 14.  This is what hip new culture is about apparently, complete disdain for anything remotely tasteful and a total disrespect for the icons and images of the this countries greatest times.  These homes were built during the baby boomer era, of men that took pride in each brick they laid, and would tear down their own work and redo it if not done as perfectly as possible the first time, craftsman, proud of their trade.  These are the homes of the people that labored to make this nation as great as it is.  Solid middle class America and all that it meant.  This new sense of entitlement to use up and dispose of anything and treat it as so much garbage has been EXEMPLIFIED in this new home and I hope for day when someone with enough money and sense of honor and dignity for what things mean, because they do mean things, even something as simple as a home, comes and buys this property and razes it to the ground and replaces it with a modest one story out of simple spite to the contemptuous nature of the people who would do such a thing in the first place.



BIAPBOB
BIAPBOB

US military foward operating bases around the world use connexes for building construction, but they are usually dug into the ground and revetted with sandbags as protection againist mortar & rocket attacks,  not set up on pedestals like this.   The asthetics of this house are attractive, however I would love to see how well this structure endures a North Texas tornado. The resulting debris field should be impressive.

Catbird
Catbird

Hipster architects are just putting their minimalist, sltty-eyeglass aesthetic everywhere! 

redblank
redblank

The use of shipping containers in this project is an unusual choice given that they:

1) Are not being used as a module -- they have been set side-by-side, but the interior walls have been cut away... why use a container if you remove the walls leaving only the roof and floor? I'd argue that structural insulated panels (SIPs) -- and perhaps even conventional construction -- would be have been far more efficient.

2) They arbitrarily force the 'grain' of the living spaces perpendicularly to the panoramic view of the lake and downtown beyond. Any sense of the amazing width and distance before you will be truncated by interior walls between you and wide aspect ratio of the view.

I understand that excitement in the neighborhood for the implementation of a non-traditional home design, but this is a wasted opportunity-- the design could have been much more site specific and the underlying concept should have been all about framing the one-of-a-kind view, not the (dated) shipping container fad.

EbbyKat
EbbyKat

This house is AMAZING! Cannot wait to see the finished product, if only from the street.  Their view is incredible from that vantage point; our view of their house will be almost as exciting.  So nice to see modern architecture flourishing in Big D!

Greg820
Greg820

Welcome to the neighborhood!  Love the design.  Great use of shade.  Will there be an open house (please please)?

dixiechickidie
dixiechickidie

Home built with shipping containers overlooking a lake... This reminds me of the mini-series 'Top of the Lake' and that story didn't end well.

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

@redblank Not to mention, shipping containers are only load bearing at the corners.  The walls and roof are not rated to support a load.  When they stack them, the only point to point contact is at the corners.

kduble
kduble

@RTGolden1 How is that different from any other construction? Look at the ceiling above you. Unless you have a pillar in the middle of the room, isn't the load borne in the corners?

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