On White Rock Lake, An Architect is Building a House Out of Shipping Containers

PV14House.jpg
PV14house.com
When Google's Street View car rolled by 422 Peavy Road in late 2011, it captured a spacious but ordinary four-bedroom, ranch-style home that was all but indistinguishable from its neighbors.

No more. The structure that's being erected in its place is a strikingly modern, 3,700-square-foot box whose third-story penthouse will afford sweeping views of White Rock Lake. It also happens to be made of shipping containers.

Candy's Dirt first caught wind of the plans back in May. Contacted by Unfair Park at the time, the builder acknowledged the project but declined to give details.

Since then, the house has been given a name -- PV14 -- as well as its own website. The website doesn't go into detail on why architect Matt Mooney, who owns and helped design the home, wanted to build it out of shipping containers other than to say that a "primary goal" was to "design & build a modern residence that has a unique character, responds to its specific location/orientation and employs the construction technologies that are readily available, but not often used in current residential construction."

Plus, shipping container houses are kind of a thing now.

In the end, the why doesn't really matter. The view of White Rock does. And it's a stunning one. Check the video:

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12 comments
Q8DHIMMI
Q8DHIMMI

US military foward operating bases around the world use connexes for building construction, but they are usually dug into the ground and revetted with sandbags as protection againist mortar & rocket attacks,  not set up on pedestals like this.   The asthetics of this house are attractive, however I would love to see how well this structure endures a North Texas tornado. The resulting debris field should be impressive.

Catbird
Catbird

Hipster architects are just putting their minimalist, sltty-eyeglass aesthetic everywhere! 

redblank
redblank

The use of shipping containers in this project is an unusual choice given that they:

1) Are not being used as a module -- they have been set side-by-side, but the interior walls have been cut away... why use a container if you remove the walls leaving only the roof and floor? I'd argue that structural insulated panels (SIPs) -- and perhaps even conventional construction -- would be have been far more efficient.

2) They arbitrarily force the 'grain' of the living spaces perpendicularly to the panoramic view of the lake and downtown beyond. Any sense of the amazing width and distance before you will be truncated by interior walls between you and wide aspect ratio of the view.

I understand that excitement in the neighborhood for the implementation of a non-traditional home design, but this is a wasted opportunity-- the design could have been much more site specific and the underlying concept should have been all about framing the one-of-a-kind view, not the (dated) shipping container fad.

EbbyKat
EbbyKat

This house is AMAZING! Cannot wait to see the finished product, if only from the street.  Their view is incredible from that vantage point; our view of their house will be almost as exciting.  So nice to see modern architecture flourishing in Big D!

Greg820
Greg820

Welcome to the neighborhood!  Love the design.  Great use of shade.  Will there be an open house (please please)?

dixiechickidie
dixiechickidie

Home built with shipping containers overlooking a lake... This reminds me of the mini-series 'Top of the Lake' and that story didn't end well.

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

@redblank Not to mention, shipping containers are only load bearing at the corners.  The walls and roof are not rated to support a load.  When they stack them, the only point to point contact is at the corners.

kduble
kduble

@RTGolden1 How is that different from any other construction? Look at the ceiling above you. Unless you have a pillar in the middle of the room, isn't the load borne in the corners?

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