If DISD Trustees Sack Mike Miles This Week, It Will Not Be About the Coggins Report

Categories: Schutze

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More than just today, maybe every day this week we need to talk here about the Dallas school superintendent and school reform, mainly because this may all be over by the end of the week. The school board will meet later this week, and the anti-reform wing of the board probably will move to fire Superintendent Mike Miles based on an investigative report released at the end of last week.

If they succeed in sacking Miles, it will be done with all sorts of blah-blah-blah about how it's not the end of reform for the Dallas public school system, just the end of Miles. Believe me, all of that will be face-saving cover story. If the anti-reformers do manage to shove Miles down the elevator shaft based on this report, they will never -- never ever ever -- allow the hiring of another seriously reform-minded superintendent in Dallas.

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Library of Congress
Mike Miles blew up the old patronage system. If you blow something up, you get blow-back. Tell me we all knew that.

In fact, before we dive into all this who-shot-john he-said-she-said about the report, let's back off, lift our eyes up from the ground clutter and look at the mountains. Under the old court-supervised Dallas deal on desegregation, black South Dallas was granted its own separate de facto school district.

I wrote about this a decade ago. In the settlement of the city's major desegregation lawsuit filed in 1970, the black plaintiffs in Dallas basically rejected integration as their goal. Instead they wanted their own separate but equal school system. A certain architecture ensued from that settlement, enforced by a federal court monitor.

Elected black trustees ruled over areas whose boundaries were roughly the same as the boundaries for a set of "sub districts." Under that system, each trustee was sort of the superintendent of his or her little school district.

If that system had been a big success, we wouldn't be having this conversation. We would not need school reform. Miles wouldn't be in town. And presumably education experts from around the nation and maybe the world would be traveling to Dallas to find out why Dallas public school students were so darned successful.

That did not happen. The school system is a dismal failure in the preparation of poor minority students for success in life. Instead, Dallas, like many major urban centers, is running what education statisticians are calling a "cradle to prison pipeline."

Hence, school reform. Hence, Miles. And why would anyone be opposed to school reform and making the schools better? This is a key point. It's why the anti-reform element wants Miles out of town, and it's why, if they succeed, they will never ever allow another reformer back into district headquarters.

The first thing Miles did when he got to town was dismantle and obliterate the basic architecture of the trustee-run sub-districts. Miles set up a new system of "executive directors" with very direct control over schools and principals. It's based on "feeder patterns" -- the series of schools from elementary to high school that a given group of kids attend all the way through -- rather than being based on political sub-districts. And the executive directors all report to him, not the trustees.

He also set up an officers training school for principals. In the old days the trustees picked or at least signed off on principals. That's over. Now Miles and his people pick principals. Trustees have nothing to say about it.

I think a lot of us missed some of the fundamental nature of these changes at the time. I know I did. Miles basically blew up the building. His executive director system, coupled with the academy for principals, effectively demolished the basic architecture of the old patronage system by which trustees ran the schools and even governed principal and teacher hiring within their own bailiwicks.

I can look back now on some of what was going on earlier this year and understand it more clearly than I did at the time. Last April I wrote about trustee Bernadette Nutall going around button-holing area directors and basically telling them not to do what Miles, their boss, told them to do and not to cross her. I had always had a lot of respect for and a pretty good relationship with Nutall, and I just didn't get it at the time. Why would she be doing stuff like that?

Now I do get it. Now it does make sense. The imposition of the new system pulled the pins from under Nutall's personal control over the schools in her own trustee district -- "her" schools, as they were commonly called before.

I also get the history better. Calling it a patronage system can be entirely pejorative, as if Nutall is some kind of crook, which she is not. The concept that minority trustees should have direct executive control over schools in their own districts evolved from the peculiar Dallas history of racial politics.

I do call it patronage. But Nutall, who is a smart person grounded in the history of her own constituency, calls the old system justice, her community's due. Her problem is that it doesn't work as way to teach kids.

These are deep-running questions. There is nothing easy about them. In order to change the existing system, the reformers had to expect major blow-back, and they've got it. If white people and business leaders and people in the rest of the city really don't give that much of a rat's ass about the public school system and can't stand the blow-back, then they can walk on Miles and walk on reform. If they do care, they have to take the blow-back.

I'm going to talk tomorrow about the external investigation into a contracting matter, about the report the board received on it last week and what's good and what's bad in that report. Just as a preview, I will tell you that the one thing I did like best in the report was that it mentioned my name. I just love that, no matter what.

The report clears Miles of all the serious allegations made against him in an earlier internal school district report. His main accuser, former TV news person and one-time head of school district communications Rebecca Rodriguez, is painted in a most unflattering light -- most unflattering!

The report also contains some factual errors and some all-around sloppiness. We'll get to that, too, of course. The worst of the errors concern the role of Lisa LeMaster, a public relations consultant. The report says things about LeMaster that are flat not true, and I think Coggins knows they are not true. More on that tomorrow.

The board is supposed to decide today when it will meet, probably later this week, to discuss what to do based on the report. At that meeting, the anti-Miles faction -- four of the sitting eight board members -- probably will try to win a vote fire him.

The point I'm trying to make here is that the Miles vote, whenever it happens, will not be about the report. The report comes down to the flimsiest sort of window-dressing -- less substance than a damp Kleenex.

The vote is about the area directors and the principals academy. The vote is about the sub-districts. The vote to get rid of Miles is about this question: Does Dallas want to go back to the old system of mini-school districts run by trustees at a cost of $1.7 billion a year? Because if the gang of four can become a gang of five and they succeed in dumping Miles, the old system is baaaack. Forever.

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94 comments
ubercool1969
ubercool1969

I get that DISD needed reforms and the racist South Dallas mafia needed to be broken up like Al qeada.  But the folks Miles went after like us lonely teachers on the bottom of the totem pole who do this out of a sense of idealism were the wrong people.  We are not the culprits here.

leftocenter
leftocenter

@JimSX

So now you're a newsmaker!   Three phone calls and a text message with Miles?  And that's in the paper?  Ok, deep throat is not at work here.  That's the worst movie plot I've ever heard.

Question:  Was Smelker's resignation letter "leaked" or "public"?  That I'm not quite clear on that one.  Less cut and dried...any chance Miles stays?  You predicted he was a goner months ago.  Finally, is there any "there" there re misbehaving/lawbreaking etc?  This "patronage" crap can't be legal?

Final point:   $100,000 for a six-week investigation...$16,666.66 a week.  HOLY COW

lzippitydoo
lzippitydoo

Miles family has moved back to Colo and they are just waiting for his return.He needs to go now, but this district is still broken from the top down. All the teachers that lost their jobs because of poor performance, needed to and there are many tough years ahead! With close to 200,000 students in a divided (North/South) voting line and a primarily minority makeup, there are no easy fixes. The school buildings look horrid and are in need of major rennovation - but any $$ coming into the district should be going to the classroom and teaching alone - so the infrastructure will not change! If someone had a choice to send their kids to a DISD school or any other surrounding district (or charter school) - what would they do??

lzippitydoo
lzippitydoo

Miles needs to leave quickly and the district can turn elsewhere to heal! The schools in DISD look like prisons and that translates into the same feel for the kids when they are there. A Frisco, Allen Southlake, Coppell or other school looks like a palace compared to a DISD school.The DISD Board has historically been divisive and with the leadership and makeup of the Board - they will get nowhere fast too! Overall a sad schooling situation and - while I went to DISD schools and sent my kids to elementary school there - there is no way I would recommend the district to any incoming student! Very sad!ds major re-fixing - but Miles thought he had a blank check to make whatever changes he wanted - without Board approval! He has already checked out - as have almost ALL of his area hires.

Greg Pulte
Greg Pulte

This story is clueless on every level.

bmarvel
bmarvel

Is it possible to despise the death-grip the ward-healers have over DISD and at the same time arrive at the conclusion that Miles' reform program is disastrously wrong for what ails Dallas education? A pox on both their houses.

Carl
Carl

If you read the opr report and Coggins they are like night and day. You ccan see the overreaching and bias in the opr report. Coggins took the high road and let the evidence not emotions write his report. Everyone knows oprs smith has been lobbying the board to put himself in charge of audit and investigations. When rodriguez stumbled into opr, smith thought the timing was right to try and further his cause. It all started to fall apart when rodriguez did not wait around to back up her claims. Opr was left with the RFP allegation also presented by rodriguez who had long since took the money and run. When that also turned out to be a dud they were left with scrounging through 50,000 miles emails and personal cell records in an attempt to find something-anything to justify the investigation and now a hundred G. Coggins will take the money and you can't blame him for that. He gave us the facts though and gave the accused respect by referring to him as Superintendent Miles rather than "Floyd" as in the opr report. Does anyone else find it ironic that one of the allegations was that miles was aware of unflattering things written about a board member yet smiths opr report (smith reports to miles) does not respect miles enough to address him as the superintendent?

Arnold
Arnold

Jones and others should take the high road on this one. It's the third week of school, The report didn't sustainoriginal allegations. Generally when that happens it is almost always something less than the most severe possible discipline. If you do fire him please for the sake of the kids have an educator ready to step in. King is a good man but we have been down that road.

Paulmi
Paulmi

This warrants nothing more than a reprimand. Put him on probation a growth plan or whatever in writing. If he screws up again as many think he will fire him on the spot and don't give him a dime or bus fare back to CO

Paulmi
Paulmi

But his friend said something that hurt my feelings!

Flabbergasted
Flabbergasted

Damage control. You remind me of the old cartoon of a mouse, flipping the bird at a set of talons as it is about to be whisked away.

If, God willing, Miles is fired, let go or bought off to go away, we win. The city wins. The STUDENTS win. Someday, in your dotage--more than now, that is, you will see the wisdom of letting him go away.

1. REFORM is not what is says it is. Most of the snake oil Miles passed off as "reform," was actually unproven teaching strategies which actually harm cognition, for they constantly interrupt the time it takes for deeper thinking and analysis.

2. Most of his "reforms" come straight from three places: Michelle Rhee, Broad Foundation and a book called, "Focus." Now, Rhee was run out on her broom, most of Broad's toads don't last and NOT ONE of their gifts to Dallas has been successful and the book is a lot of horse-hockey, because it shows that those who think that drawing is not important in elementary reading classes, to help teach the story, are idiots.

3. Miles made dubious claims, referenced his own paper as research, when it was not, and even misquoted other studies, thinking teachers and parents were too stupid to know the difference. Note: We are pretty freaking smart. NO study shows that having doors open helps learning, and NO study shows that having lights off overhead to do a powerpoint MAKES people sleep---a boring powerpoint will, though.




Random
Random

This is what you said today, and I wonder how people don't get it?  However, the issue is so complicated, especially when race is tossed, it's hard to wrap ones head around, especially if one has never had kids in a public school system.

1)  The first thing Miles did when he got to town was dismantle and obliterate the basic architecture of the trustee-run sub-districts. 

2)heSet up a new system of "executive directors" with very direct control over schools and principals. It's based on "feeder patterns" -- the series of schools from elementary to high school.

3)The executive directors all report to him, not the trustees.

4)he also Set up an officers training school for principals. In the old days the trustees picked or at least signed off on principals. Now Miles and his people pick principals. Trustees have nothing to say about it.   (Nor should they since they are NOT PUBLIC SCHOOL EDUCATORS)

5)The new system pulled the pins from under Nutall's, as an example, personal control over the schools in her own trustee district -- "her" schools, as they were commonly called before.

6)The concept that minority trustees should have direct executive control over schools in their own districts evolved from the peculiar Dallas history of racial politics. Nutall, who is a smart person grounded in the history of her own constituency, calls the old system justice, her community's due. Her problem is that it doesn't work as way to teach kids.

7) If white people and business leaders and people in the rest of the city really don't give that much of a rat's ass about the public school system and can't stand the blow-back, then they can walk on Miles and walk on reform. If they do care, they have to take the blow-back.

Don't give up, Jim.

JimSX
JimSX topcommenter

I just tried to explain my personal involvement in the Coggins report to a staff meeting here at the Observer, and the verdict seemed to be that they wanted me to stop explaining it because it was too boring.

Tom434
Tom434

The DISD has a special election on 11/5/2013 to fill the District 8 seat.  Over under number is set at 5% voter turnout, I say under

dallas_dude
dallas_dude

Oklahoma and other states have shown wonders w/ mandatory pre-school.  Your ROI for mandatory, 100% preschool enrollment is astonishing compared to the after school programs, tutoring, class room aides, remedial education, etc required at the later levels.

Seems like blindly throwing money at the problem, testing like crazy, and trying to apply failed MBA business tactics seem to be the only thing some people can understand.

uptownguy1
uptownguy1

I thought DISD hired a professional and not an amateur.  This man has extensive experience with policy, guidelines and implementation.  He's been in the military, served as an Army Ranger and the Foreign Service office in Russia.  He's worked in school districts in CO and even ran, unsuccessfully, for a CO Senate seat.  One would think he would know how to operate and maneuver the political spectrum.  But alas, he does not. 

This past year and half is full of rookie mistakes.

He did violate part of his contract in spreading negative publicity regarding specific BOT members.  He also had inappropriate communication with a potential vendor.  Either directly or indirectly those facts remain.  Publicly disparaging your boss, in his case the BOT, would definitely get a corporate individual fired immediately.

How can the BOT trust this man on anything?  If he doesn't get his way he finds a scapegoat to do his dirty work.  Smelker's resignation letter fiasco is even more unprofessional than any of the content Smelker described within the letter.  This speaks volumes regarding Miles if Smelker is an indication of his quality hires. 

Change for the better is good.  Change for the sake of change is a dog chasing his tail (going nowhere really fast).  Stevesinbox2006 below gives a prime example.

Let's remove the amateur and get a real professional who will work with all persons involved.


stevesinbox2006
stevesinbox2006

I think it will be about the Coggins report , specifically the Jones issue. If the board has a problem with miles and a resigning subordinate working together (with le master?) to throw jones under the bus, then I think he's gone. If he will do it to her, who is next, and do they trust him to not throw them under the Schutze/Celeste bus.

And Jim, I get that you, Cekeste, Smelker et al see her as a meddling beyotch chaing off good employees. I went back and watched the video of the meeting le master referenced, and I see her doing her job. Or at least what I think her job should be. Asking questions about how 1.7 billion dollars is being spent. Maybe Smelker was used to a rubber stamp. But jones didn't hire miles, think its possible she had more questions than the old guard? And as stated above in the comments, just because he's making changes doesn't mean he's making the right changes. You seem to think that just because he's making changes, that's good. I think the point Bentsen, mc naughton and others are making are not all changes are good. Spending money to train principals, and then to have those people leave the district isn't a good use of funds. Running off 50 principals seemed designed more for churn, than targeted fixes.

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

If we continue to use the word "reform" in relation to DISD, I think that there needs to be some clarification. I read these threads with interest, and it seems clear to me that one of the big reasons we continue to talk past each other is that "reform" in this context means at least two different things to different people.

DISD is badly in need of educational reform and institutional reform - and the former won't happen without the latter - I don't know if Miles is the one for the job, but I do know that nothing changes in an institution until the power-structure changes.

Rumpunch1
Rumpunch1

It is unfair to classify everyone trying to get rid of Miles as "anti-reform".  Miles background and results in Colorado, of which Bill Betzen keeps having to remind us, makes me wonder why he was even selected.  We need a true reformer, or at least one who has any kind of chance in making a different. 

hwy77
hwy77

I knew something was wrong when the communications director tried to claim she had committed DISD to a contract. That isn't a communications director's role in any normal organization, certainly not a major school district. Dallas and DISD would be fortunate to keep Miles, but Channel 8 will continue to play stooge for the powers that want him gone. A thorough house cleaning is long past due over there; maybe Mr. Shipp will follow the dinosaurs out the door.

EastDallasDad
EastDallasDad

@lzippitydoo Keep in mind that 90% of the teachers that left did so voluntarily. I agree that ineffective teachers need to go, but Miles ran off more good ones than he did bad ones.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum

@Greg Pulte I'd make a snide remark about your dismissive hand-waving if I thought you would receive notification of said remark.

JimSX
JimSX topcommenter

@Flabbergasted 

So it's all snake oil and Broad and Rhee, is it? Let me, see. What did you forget? Oh, yeah. What's your idea?

Flabbergasted
Flabbergasted


4. Jones asked great questions. She was vilified for it, because, again, the leadership at 3700, no matter who they are, thinks that the board is a rubber stamp company. To question someone is seen as harassment, and a journalist should know better.

5. Two thousand teachers left DISD this past year, and it is SO bad, Miles had to send out an email about poaching, warning teachers that if they left after Julty12th, they would see DISD go after their certification. He sent this out THREE times. THREE. THEN, in August, he sent an email to 150 other ISD's, warning of the same. Now, a GOOD superintendent does not have to threaten teachers to STAY. That email was his "tell," his sign that he blinked. He wanted to stop the blood loss ASAP, but could not, so he threatens teachers who are unhappy. Good leadership there. And, for the record, the trustees had NOTHING to do with this.

Flabbergasted
Flabbergasted

Well, that shows how dull the Observer has become, or how dull YOU have become. I found it infinitely disgusting and fascinating that a reporter I used to respect has sold his soul for what, a charlatan.

EastDallasDad
EastDallasDad

@Tom434 At least there are two candidates to choose from unlike when Morath ran and the other candidates were convinced to withdraw.

EastDallasDad
EastDallasDad

@dallas_dude There is a ton of research that supports it too. The achievement gap is already established before a child ever sets foot on a DISD campus.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

@uptownguy1 

" One would think he would know how to operate and maneuver the political spectrum." -- True, very, very true and he does.


But alas, here, we are talking about taking down a patronage system which is something entirely different

RHBlake
RHBlake

@stevesinbox2006 When implementing major change effort, one needs loyalty. Anyone against what you are doing will undermine the effort at every turn. Remember "Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun"?

Chuck_Schick
Chuck_Schick

@TheCredibleHulk The board hires (and fires) the superintendent and sets the budget. That's it. Maybe they try to do other things because the job is so simple.

uptownguy1
uptownguy1

@EastDallasDad @lzippitydoo Ditto.  I know several good teachers who left for other school districts.  Also, several would have left before school started however the district threatened to pull their teaching certificates if they moved to one of the 150+ "neighboring" school districts.

Talk about an abusive relationship - "we hate you and want to get rid of you, but you can't leave us".  In corporate America that's not tolerated.

Flabbergasted
Flabbergasted

6. His fellows academy is NOTHING like officers training. Who sold you that storyline? Oh, the same people who told you his methods were like the real Army. Uh, no. Ask any veteran, and they will first laugh, then get pissed, because he is an embarrassment to the military. ANY good leadership manual tells the officer to think of the troops first, not last.

7. The millions spent on this debacle and placement of them on campuses will echo for years, so as soon as he is gone, so will the academy. That is why they are holding back on positions that are vacant. See, Jim, we in DISD know how many are missing from our ranks and which ones are NOT posted. They are betting that when he leaves, they will need jobs, so let's hold some spots for them all.

8. Your history lesson shows you are stuck in the past, and not in a good way. Times HAVE changed in Dallas, and the BIGGEST threat to DISD is not the black Mafia, but the "education reform" business model. It is sad that you cannot, or will not, see this.

uptownguy1
uptownguy1

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul @uptownguy1 

How does the patronage system actually impact the day to day activities in the classroom?  I understand contracts being awarded and a system of participants "moving to a different department".  But that doesn't have much to do with the kids in the classroom.  

Why are "one size fits all" teaching techniques required?  A math class is very different than a foreign language class, but teachers are required to use the same techniques and prohibited from using others. For example, reading aloud is not permitted.  How can one teach a foreign language or an ESL class unless the student is required to actually "speak the language"?

What has happened this past year is the administrators have been put on notice and they've essentially "dialed up the crazy" and taking it out on the teachers.  The people who chose to instruct your children - and in many cases are the only people who really care about your child's welfare - are the ones required to endure this wrath from an administration that's reeling.

Driving off good teachers only "dumbs down" the profession and students will suffer as a result.  We've all had teachers and coaches who have impacted us throughout the rest of our lives and who still influence us today.

As stated earlier, Miles is an amateur.


stevesinbox2006
stevesinbox2006

Look, I don't know how you feel about Haag, except you don't return his calls, but didn't him or Hobbs have an article about how 3 of 4 of their super principals are leaving or left?

Much of what I hear is cookie cutter, one size fits all solutions. And even you can admit that the problems aren't the same at every school, right? I want reform, I want the district to do better, but I want the right reforms. I want a supt that can identify and cut out the cancers, while leaving the healthy tissue of good teachers and principals alone. Right now I see a guy who is a lousy politician in a political job, and a guy with a bad track record of hiring his cabinet. Sprague, oberlon, Rodriguez, an HR director with no HR experience...

In my mind, miles was fighting an uphill battle, and needed to be buttoned up every where else so he could focus on his reforms . And he stepped in it from the beginning with Speagues salary and never had coffee comment, and he's been fighting it ever since. And I think the board could find that 5th vote to find someone else to carry on, without the baggage and lack of trust there is with miles

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@Flabbergasted

OK, fair enough. But he hasn't reformed anything structural in the institution because his hands have been tied - It's not like he's not trying. 

I also personally don't think that his methods of "education" reform are the right ones for Dallas, or anywhere, for that matter. But again, you totally disregard the other, structural issue. If I were a betting man, I'd bet you have a personal stake in keeping the structure the way it is

All of the best educational practices in the world won't save children from a dysfunctional system. It's like you want to repair the engine but leave the tires flat.

Vodka ain't teaching kids, either.


Flabbergasted
Flabbergasted

Really, now, structural flaws?

Did he "reform" overcrowded classrooms?"
No, he tried to CUT 66 middle school positions to PAY for his "academy of do-nothings."

Did he increase the budget for the fine arts?

No, but he talks about art class every chance he gets.

Did he actually research good teaching techniques? No, he bought ONE book and is using it like the Bible, and it is a useless book, too.

Did he "reform" anything? No.

Those who teach understand what reform REALLY is, and what is passed off AS reform.


Snake oil ain't vodka.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum

@FlabbergastedSpoken like one who is able to report the news from the trenches - and who hates the general's orders - but is unable to see the larger picture and the merit in reforming the district's overarching structural flaws.

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@Flabbergasted 

I hate to use a tired internet meme to respond to point 8 . . .

but here goes . . . 

Why can't it be both?

You dismiss a large and completely dysfunctional chunk of the problem by looking past this issue. It hasn't gone away in 30 - some years, why would you think it will disappear in the future?

Flabbergasted
Flabbergasted

Over 90% of MY students PASS the state mandated test for their level/grade-- year, after year, after year. THAT IS WHY I HAVE THE RIGHT. So, shut up on that old Flores trick of painting all teachers with the same brush.

And ENOUGH with the RACE CARD, white man!!!!! ENOUGH. Basta! For those of us who have spent decades---centuries, collectively, teaching in a district that is OVERWHELMINGLY minority, we are sick to death of the race card being played against us.

We CHOOSE to STAY in DISD, get it? We are offered jobs in suburban districts in Regional Service Centers--and for those of us with advanced degrees in Science or Math, shots at teaching at DCCCD. We are offered postings at private schools, charter schools and as CORPORATE trainers.

So, stop already. We CAN leave ANYTIME we want. WE CHOOSE to stay, but 2,000 others had enough and left.

What is your hard on for this guy, dude?

EastDallasDad
EastDallasDad

@JimSX

@Flabbergasted

No it doesn't Jim. The research says that teachers have the most impact among school related factors, but school factors are much less significant than other factors. Miles and other pseudo-reformers often forget the last part of the sentence.

While there is some variation in the percentages, the research says about 60-75% of student achievement is determined by non-school factors. Most studies indicate that somewhere between 7.5 - 8% of student achievement is directly attributable to the teacher but the number may be as high as 20%.

JimSX
JimSX topcommenter

@Flabbergasted 

What is it in your success rate that makes you think you have the right to demand your version  of "good change?" And please don't trot out the old crypto-racist shit about parents. The research says you are way more important than the parents. Why do you keep fighting your own significance? Is it because you don't want to have to live up to it?

Random
Random

@Flabbergasted

As a former DISD parent, YES, we need help with funding in the classrooms, teaching supplies, cleaning supplies, for arts programs, among other basic things. The kids need a lot more time in the classroom and a lot less time testing, which, unfortunately, are state mandated issues.

Maybe we need to separate funding for basic things you guys need and get those taken care of first.   

Then we can attack structure and control.  Who gets the contract for the asphalt parking lot has nothing to do with pencil and Kleenex needs. 

Maybe we need to stop putting the cart before the horse.  We do appreciate what you all do. Don't quit!!!

Flabbergasted
Flabbergasted

9. FINALLY, PLEASE QUIT INSULTING TEACHERS WITHTHE RIGHT-WING LINE THAT TEACHERS ARE AGAINST REFORM.

NO, WE AR ENOT. WHAT WE ARE AGAINST IS IDIOCY, COPRRUPTION AND B.S. WE ARE AGAINST OVER-TESTING AND UNDER-FUNDING. WE ARE AGAINST THE BUSINESSMEN OF DALLAS WITH THEIR DEATH GRIP ON A DISTRICT NONE OF THEIR KIDS ATTEND.

We want help, we want change, but GOOD change, not bull crap.

Learn the difference. Go teach in DISD.

leftocenter
leftocenter

I think you've hit on the real tragedy -- the exact same point @JimSX made -- if this opportunity for reform is missed it will not come again.  Can't ignore missteps by Miles contributed though. 

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