Coppell Dad Starts Small Organ Donation Charity in Daughter's Memory, Rewards Himself With Six-Figure Salary

Categories: News

TaylorsGiftGolfTourney.jpg
taylorsgift.org
Todd Storch
This is what 13-year-old Taylor Storch left behind when she died in a skiing accident three years ago: a heart, which went on to beat in the chest of a 39-year-old mother in Arizona; two kidneys, which saved two separate people in Colorado; two corneas, which helped restore sight to two others. In other words, life.

That, ostensibly at least, is what's being referred to by Coppell-based Taylor's Gift, the foundation her parents established in her memory. Alternately, it could be interpreted as another byproduct of Taylor's legacy: a handsome, six-figure salary for dad.

According to tax documents filed for 2011, the most recent year available, Todd Storch earned $100,000 per year as the foundation's president and collected another $8,500 in expenses.

For the head of a small nonprofit, that salary is high. For the director of a small nonprofit that had total revenues of $163,000 for that year, that figure is astronomical.

Storch defended his compensation in an interview Monday with WFAA.

"Every organization has to have an operating budget, have a strategic plan, has to have the right people in place to get their mission accomplished," he told reporter Janet St. James.

The mission of Taylor's Gift is to raise awareness about the good that comes from organ donation. The Storches' story, which played out on the national media three years ago, did that.

The $10,000 the organization currently spends per year on "advertising and promotion," on the other hand -- the only significant expenditure that doesn't cover salary, benefits, travel, or administrative costs -- doesn't do much.

You don't need Charity Navigator CEO Ken Berger to tell you that Taylor's Gift is a terrible charity, but St. James talks to him anyways, just to be safe.

"Good heavens," he told her. "More than half the money is going to just one salary? It's a very worrisome sign, indeed."

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27 comments
TEXTEX
TEXTEX

Well, the charity was founded in 2010.  His linkedin profile also shows that he is CEO of KTS Consulting so is he even spending 2,080 hours a year as CEO of Taylor's Gift?  This is a "big" charity in our area, and this makes me really hesitant to participate in any of the fundraisers that benefit it.  He should work a REAL job and then run the foundation on the side until enough donations are generated to require full-time, top-dollar CEO.  Any of us could probably run the charity with 10-15 hours of work a month.

hall16243
hall16243

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lzippitydoo
lzippitydoo

Wow- that is amazing - that he even donated a small portion to the cause! Can you say crook?? Going forward, now that the word is out, lets see him out in the market talking to potential donors. "Sir, this is a great cause and after I get paid, some of what you donate may go towards what you want it to" - ha! "I know this is a bogus charity, but dont worry about the funds -- it's the thought that counts, not the $$" !!

jamessavik
jamessavik

Compared to some charities, this one is almost legit. 

He took 60%. Even some well known charities eat up well over this percentage in "administrative costs".

Wanna check the books of some Dallas area Mega-churches?



markfbrack
markfbrack

Thanks to the Dallas Observer I WILL NOT be giving any of my hard earned cash to "Taylor's Gift!!!!

doublecheese
doublecheese

100K a year is simply middle class.  Maybe he's trying to grow the organization.  You can't do that effectively while working another full time job.

J_A_
J_A_

How do you regulate accountability in charitable organizations? People will have widely varying opinions on appropriate salaries for non-profit employees. And if you contribute because you really want to make a difference you're trusting the people in charge of those funds. And we all know people suck.

Cowtown
Cowtown

Another little gem from that report was that Don Hooton, who has made a big deal out of his "outrage" over his son's death from steroids, has capitalized on it to the tune of $178,000 per year.

LeroyJenkem
LeroyJenkem

Hey, if it works for Nancy Brinker...

mbcez
mbcez

Whats the big deal, almost every charity in existence is just a front for people to put themselves in executive positions and collect a large salary.  Non profit just means the business doesn't profit, the money still makes its way into the owner/operators pocket, just in the form of salary instead of profits!

oakclifftownie
oakclifftownie

Well I guess there are enough groups out there to raise organ donor awareness ?

observist
observist topcommenter

It's not really that outrageous if the charity continues to grow and his salary stays the same.  For example, if he made a lot of connections, planned events, "raised awareness" that will allow the charity to take in $400,000 next year, that's not too bad.  If his salary remains 2/3 of the charity's revenue for another year, then it's failing and he should join up with a larger, more cost-efficient charity.

animas
animas

Let's not forget the "free advertising" that these sorts of scavengers get from the news media at Channels 5,8,11 which allows them to perpetuate their rip offs of the public under the guise of " family tragedy."  In the Storch case, according to the article above- the only expenditure of funds collected from the gullible  public -,was $10,000 for "advertising", apparently in an effort to continue the ruse.

groggydog
groggydog

@lakewoodhobo I think it's different when we're talking about greater than 50% of the organization's revenue. By all means, if you're pulling in millions of dollars have a six-figure salary. But it doesn't count as "paying for talent" when you're the only person who's ever run it.

tdkisok
tdkisok

@observist 


I have had a lot of experience with nonprofits and know what many CEO's make. This is not cool. The CEOs of most this size make $0. His response was legalese and bullshit. 

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

@animas and they both have been on the Ticket and talked about on the The Ticket numerous times each year.  I would mention the other sports stations too, but they have a bout 10 listeners a piece so they dont count

observist
observist topcommenter

@tdkisok @observist   Few people can afford to work for $0.  Should only independently wealthy people head charities?  Or should they limit their time to just what's left over after they work another job to support themselves?   I'm not saying he's definitely not a scammer, just that the fact he paid himself $100k doesn't mean he is a scammer. 

animas
animas

On an eerie note, remember Jayne Peters, the Coppell mayor who committed suicide and allegedly killed her daughter? Storch's name shows up in the newspaper article about that tragedy where he claims that he and Mayor Peters were "very close", that she was " always there for him" and that she (Peters)  was on his charity's board. Unusual...to say the least.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@observist @CogitoErgoSum @tdkisok The comment indicated no such thing. From the WFAA story:

"Charity Navigator is an independent evaluator designed to help donors make decisions on where to give. Most of the charities they evaluate take in over a million dollars annually, and only a fraction of those on the lower end pay the CEO a six-figure salary, Berger said.

"In fact, one of the board members is the wife of the CEO," Berger said. "I mean, how objective and independent is that? So that's another very bad sign that the people responsible for the duty of care and loyalty to make sure this charity does good work, are relatives of the CEO."

observist
observist topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum @observist @tdkisok  The comment indicated the charity navigator honcho knew nothing about the charity other than salary/revenue ratio for 2011, the first year the guy established the charity.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@observist @tdkisok When the Charity Navigator honcho (whose job it is to know the model of a well-run/ethical charity) says it's terrible, I tend to give him some credence.

tdkisok
tdkisok

@observist @tdkisok

Justify paying a CEO $100,000 a year salary plus $8,700 for expenses for a charity that raised $168,000 in one year. Do it with a straight face. 

"Should only independently wealthy people head charities?"

Please, that is one stupid question. Of course not, but should a CEO make well over half of what is taken in. Doesn't that sound like a person who isn't doing their job well?

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