Douglas Feldman, the Plano Terminator, Lived and Died an Evil Bastard

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Murderpedia
Douglas Alan Feldman, 55, the remorseless, highly intelligent psychopath who terrorized three North Texas counties for more than a week while he went on a shooting rampage, was executed Wednesday. And he shuffled off his mortal coil with the same venom with which he inhabited it.

According to an Associated Press reporter who attended the execution, Feldman was fidgety, his feet moving nervously beneath the sheets in Huntsville's death chamber.

In mock declamation, he recited the names of his victims, pronouncing them guilty. "I have sentenced them both to death. I personally carried out their executions," he said, AP reports. "As of that time, the state of Texas has been holding me illegally in confinement and by force for 15 years.

"I hereby protest my pending execution and demand immediate relief."

Feldman carried out these "executions" back in 1998, beginning with a night ride on his Harley through Plano. He claimed an 18-wheeler nearly ran him off the road. So, he pulled alongside the cab and emptied his clip, killing the driver. On his way home, he pulled off at an Exxon fueling station in Dallas and shot a tanker driver in the back. A week later, he shot and wounded another man at a Jack in the Box simply because he was standing next to a big rig.

A witness got his license plate number. Police later tracked it to a home in Richardson, where they met a financial analyst who had graduated with honors from Southern Methodist University. Inside, they found two guns and some 300 rounds of ammunition. Ballistics tests proved one of the guns was a match.

A jury found him guilty and sentenced him to die. On the inside, Feldman didn't find Jailhouse Jesus. He was irretrievably malevolent. "It feels wonderful to cause their death and to watch their pain," he said in one letter, according to AP.

As I reported recently, he was a troublemaker, and prior to a recent media interview attempted to tear a phone from the wall.

I still wrestle with the death penalty after witnessing an execution. It's the lack of certainty often found in criminal cases that bugs me, and the inherently contradictory nature of it all -- sentencing a man to die for killing to demonstrate that we don't condone killing.

But then the state executes a man like Feldman.


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31 comments
none
none

until you're on that jury, and you see all the evidence, the confessions and the threat that he would do it again....see the poor families and their suffering....decide then, not... if you have NO CLUE! Ignorance is bliss, isn't it?

fpd1982
fpd1982

douglas alan Feldman I don't know you or anything you've been through but I know what you were accused of and executed for and from what ive read about you and hearing your last words you seem like a total asshole, if there is a hell I hope you burn in it 

ScooterLivinsgton1
ScooterLivinsgton1

The KKKhristian state of TeKKKxas crucufied a Jew.

Just shows what an anti-Semite RicKKK Perry is.

Sharon_Moreanus
Sharon_Moreanus topcommenter

Shoud be interesting since the last of the pentobarbital expires in sept. and still seven slated to be executed.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

"I still wrestle with the death penalty after witnessing an execution. It's the lack of certainty often found in criminal cases that bugs me, and the inherently contradictory nature of it all -- sentencing a man to die for killing to demonstrate that we don't condone killing."

But abortion carries no such angst or regret, for the disposal of an unwanted collection of cells with the mere potential of life and possible achievement of greatness for having had committed the heinous and barbarous crime of possessing the sad misfortune of being unwanted and is thus disposed of without the benefit of trial, defense or appeal.

James080
James080

"-- sentencing a man to die for killing to demonstrate that we don't condone killing."

Wrong. We don't condone murder, which is the taking of a life without legal justification. We execute murderers to keep them from murdering again, whether while they are still in prison, upon their escape, or following release. 

brantley.hargrove1
brantley.hargrove1

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul I don't think you'll find anyone who thinks abortion is awesome. Still, it's not my body that has to carry it to term, so I'm not inclined to think I have the right to say a word about it.

James_the_P3
James_the_P3

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul The difference being that I'm not implicated when a woman has an abortion.  I am implicated, however, when the State of which I am a citizen executes a man, ostensibly in my name.

But since we're talking about inconsistent political positions, I always find it interesting that the same people who think that a jury should be empowered to sentence a man to death are those who don't think a jury should be allowed to award more than $250,000 in non-economic damages in medical malpractice cases.  Perhaps they think that when you get the jury summons to go down to the George Allen courthouse, your brain turns to mush, but when you get the summons to go down to the Frank Crowley courthouse, you become omniscient.  

What power those few blocks must have.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@James080 Wrong. There is no justification for killing a person unless it is unavoidable in an act of self-defense or in the defense of another whose life and limb are threatened. An enlightened society will ultimately recognize this and abolish the death penalty. It is simply cruel and barbaric. This man was scum but he was a person with a right to life, though that life should only continue in prison.

ScooterLivinsgton1
ScooterLivinsgton1

@TheCredibleHulk @ScooterLivinsgton1 No, you bloodthirsty neanderthal TeKKKxas fuckwits need the help. You assholes are an embarrassment to the rest of the US. You want to secede...please do.

אם אתה הורג יהודי עוד עשר יבוא אחריך.

PlanoDave
PlanoDave

@brantley.hargrove1  Bullshit.

The difference is that you don't know anybody who has ever been executed, but you do know people who have chosen to have an abortion.  And, for whatever reason, you sympathize with their situation.

Climb down from your high horse and at least be honest about it.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

@brantley.hargrove1 @ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul  

By that same token, since you are not the person being put to death or the one performing the execution, am I correct in assuming that you cannot have an opinion about the death penalty either?

Again, it was a philosophical question about when life may be taken and under what circumstances.  I wanted to see what sort of responses might be generated.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

@James_the_P3 @ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul

It was meant as a juxtapositional philosophy question about when life may be taken and under what circumstances.

I was interested in what sort of responses the the posting may elicit.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum he lost his right to life when he took another mans life.  no if ands or buts about it

The_triplefake_Brandon_Eley
The_triplefake_Brandon_Eley

@CogitoErgoSum The convict is allowed visitation with their family members to say goodbye before their death.  They are provided access to religious guidance as well as a last meal.  Steps are taken to ensure the convict (scum) is as comfortable as possible during their death. None of these comforts are afforded to the killers' victims.  So the DP may be awful or any other similar adjective, but to call it cruel and barbaric is a slap to the face of victims and their families.    

James080
James080

@CogitoErgoSum  

The Supreme Court of the United State disagrees with you, and so do I. Think of it this way, we execute murders in defense of their next victim, whether it be a prison guard, another inmate, or some misguided liberal activist.

JFPO
JFPO

We are far from an enlightened society, especially in Texas.

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum Several thousand years of human experience beg to differ with you.  There are many problems with the death penalty, chief among them prosecutorial misconduct and wrongful convictions.  However, in this case, a man beyond any shadow of doubt guilty of the remorseless, senseless murders of two people, never seeing the error in what he did, execution was the proper, legal and, in my own opinion, morally right thing to do.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

what is this Old Testament u speak of

The_triplefake_Brandon_Eley
The_triplefake_Brandon_Eley

@CogitoErgoSum  The administration of the death penalty reads like a bureaucrat's wet dream.  Barbaric?  Try this.  

The convict goes through his/her last day, enduring the cruelty of a last meal, visiting with family, etc.  Strapped to the gurney in the death chamber, the warden gives their final okay.  Armed prison officials enter the room containing the convict's witnesses and fatally shoots any of his/her loved ones in the back of the head.

Immediately, a reality television crew enters the death chamber to record and broadcast the convict's reaction to the death of his/her loved ones.

The convict is returned to gen pop for the remainder of their miserable life.  At anytime during their sentence, that reality television crew may    show him/her a video of their loved ones being murdered to record and broadcast an updated reaction to the death of their loved ones.  THAT is barbarism.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@The_triplefake_Brandon_Eley @CogitoErgoSum Allow me to clarify my use of the word "scum," since you seem to be trying to call me out or something. He brutally murdered people. In my book that makes you scum, but you still deserve to live, or -- at least -- no one has the right to take your life without your consent.

Regarding how humanely you think execution is, the fact remains that these convicts must be strapped onto a table like an animal, while a small audience watches, and be forcibly injected with poison. That is cruel, whether you like it or not. It is only a half-measure removed from the public executions of old. Barbarism is intrinsic to execution, whether it's being drawn and quartered or injected with poison. Criminals are not executed to placate the victims' families, as in "eye for an eye." They are executed because they broke the most serious law we have. The punishment must change if we are to claim that we truly value human life.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@James080 @CogitoErgoSum Life in prison means they would only be limited to victimizing someone inside the prison. There are ways to prevent oportunities for violence inside prison, i.e. solitary confinement. The Supreme Court has been known to see the error of its ways as societal mores change.

ScooterLivinsgton1
ScooterLivinsgton1

@JFPO TeKKKxas is nothing more than  Germany of the 1930s; all RicKKK Perry needs is a toothbrush mustache....

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@casiepierce @JFPO After you. I reject your notion that because the rest of the world sees Texas as full of redneck, gun-toting, Bible-beaters that we must live up to that stereotype.

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

@CogitoErgoSum @RTGolden1 No sir, that is not my argument.  For the entirety of human existence, mankind has identified those who disdain the lives of their fellow men.  Mankind has found that the only effective treatment for these villains is to sentence them to death.  At times, that meant a simple banishment, for a man on his own in prehistoric times was very likely to meet his demise.  At other times that meant execution.  What mankind has figured out, and apparently left you out of the loop on it, is that some people cannot be rehabilitated.  They place no value on human life and therefore should forfeit theirs.  Nice straw man on the slavery thing though, it has nothing to do with what I said, nor with the story, but works for your argument.  Good thing, since without it, you don't really have an argument.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

@RTGolden1 @CogitoErgoSum Your argument, then, is if it was done by humans for several thousand years, it must be the best way to do things? That's pretty weak. By that rationale, slavery was fine, too.

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