After Neighbors Lose Far North Dallas Walmart Fight, Richardson Passes Limits on Big Box Stores

Categories: Development, News

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Walmart
When people in Far North Dallas set out to fight a Walmart Supercenter planned for the corner of Coit and Arapaho roads, you could tell City Councilwoman Sandy Greyson wanted to help. There just wasn't anything she could do, save for meet with company representatives and convince them to conduct a pro forma survey that -- surprise, surprise -- revealed that most area residents were excited about, or at the very least would shop at, the store.

Greyson was powerless in this case because he had no leverage, and she had no leverage because zoning rules in Dallas allow stores of up to 100,000 square feet to operate in commercial areas without City Council approval. The proposed Walmart weighed in at a probably strategic 90,000 square feet.

The city of Richardson was paying attention. It caps the size of new retail stores at 70,000 square feet unless the council approves an exception.

See also
-Neighbors Lose Bid to Stop a Far North Dallas Walmart, but the Fight Goes On
-In Far North Dallas, Neighbors Are Rallying to Stop a Walmart Planned for Arapaho and Coit

Its border is literally across the street from the Walmart, and many of its residents played a key role in the grassroots fight to stop it, which ultimately failed two weeks back. And so, on July 22, the Richardson City Council unanimously passed what blogger Mark Steger dubs the "Say No to Walmart Amendment." It caps the size of new retail stores at 70,000 square feet unless the council approves an exception.

Walmart was never specifically mentioned during deliberations, but when you're talking big boxes, Walmart is never far from mind. City staff members who proposed the change to city rules argued that "large-scale retail uses potentially produce greater impacts ... related to building mass, traffic, parking, and other concerns to surrounding neighborhoods" and would benefit from a "case-by-case location review."

Richardson isn't the first city to impose such limits. Irving, Fort Worth, McKinney, Arlington, Frisco, Plano, and Carrollton, have caps ranging from 50,000 to 80,000 square feet.

One plan commissioner put it this way: "It seems like a fair break in the scale of these boxes. Anything it seems over and above 70,000 square feet seems to be the ones where we get blowback from neighborhoods. Stuff under that, we don't so much so I guess I find myself a little bit surprised we didn't do this a long time ago."

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19 comments
corkyvonluxembourg
corkyvonluxembourg

Why do you liberals hate Walmart? Is it because they're providing cheap prescriptions that the gov't should be providing thru subsidies? Face it, Eric, Walmart is providing inexpensive consumer goods far better than your Utopian Government could provide, even in your Obama Wonderland. But keep fighting common sense. It's job security for you at the DO.

dallas_dude
dallas_dude

The same people that don't care what wal-mart does bitch and complain about jobs not being created and industry going over seas.  If things keep going the way they are in 10 years people will either work for walmart or the government or just live off welfare.


Exactly what good does adding a bunch of $9/hr jobs when you end up closing 2 or 3 surrounding stores in the process.

lebowski300
lebowski300

I bet at the time it seemed like a good idea to say yes to adding Arlijngton to the spell check dictionary.

lebowski300
lebowski300

I bet at the time it seemed like a good idea to answer "yes" on adding "Arlijngton" to the spell check dictionary.

MikeWestEast
MikeWestEast

Then Wal-Mart puts 90k stores in each of the cardinal directions at the border surrounding Richardson. People cross the line and that 1 per cent, a city's share, goes to Dallas et al, not Richardson. It is not like Richardson is a gigantic regional area. You can cross it in 10 minutes in a car. It is the same as Daniel Day Lewis in There Will Be Blood sucking out the oil from an arrogant neighbor and then informing him he already has the sap's oil when the sap tries to sell it.

WhiteWhale
WhiteWhale

So what does Richardson expect to replace all the dead retail spaces?  Mega churches and government offices can only take over so many of the old dead retail spaces.  Thank god they got Target and Lowes big boxes to build on the carcass of  Richardson Square. 

ruddski
ruddski

This blatant racism won't stop a 70,000 sf Walmart. What then?

ebailey75057
ebailey75057

@corkyvonluxembourg Liberals don't hate Walmart.  People\Citizens\Normal human beings dislike Walmart due to the low wages they pay their employees, and how they and other big box stores move in and stifle Mom and Pop owned stores.  And what is this with this liberal vs conservative slant.  Wake up People!, this isn't a football game, us vs them.  We are all Americans and we better start learning how to work together or this country is further going down the tubes.

RobertStinson
RobertStinson

@mjo0 Have you ever been to Jerry's stay-jum in Arlijngjton?

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@MikeWestEast 

*ha ha*

Wal-Mart drinks Richardson's milkshake!

dallas_dude
dallas_dude

@MikeWestEast right...so there should be a walmart spaced out every mile in all of DFW?  Increased sales tax, decreased property value and....(wait for it)....decreased property tax.  Solid plan captain.

dallas_dude
dallas_dude

@ruddski what is racist about this?  Good municipalities take active roles in their local commerce.  Go drive around the abrams and 635 area where there is a giant walmart...want to live there?  How about montfort and 635?  Hell how about anywhere close to i-20 in Arlington and GP?  You can pretty much draw a circle within walking distance around any supercenter and see crime spike in that area.

ryan762
ryan762

@dallas_dude @ruddski So crime goes up at the end of the parking lot (that's just about walking distance in Dallas these days)?

Tim.Covington
Tim.Covington

@dallas_dude @ruddski I have news for you, that neighborhood was just as bad before they built the Walmart. It has been going downhill since the 1990s.

RobertStinson
RobertStinson

@Tim.Covington @RobertStinson @dallas_dude @ruddski The apartments in the area are a very small part of the neighborhood. The area is dominated by single family homes and has a very low crime rate. I have a close friend who lives there and the schools are excellent, which is why it attracts so many families.

Tim.Covington
Tim.Covington

@RobertStinson @Tim.Covington @dallas_dude @ruddski I lived over there from 2000-2002. It was bad then. I had friends living over there from 1997-2001, and it was going downhill then.

The only reason I moved over there in 2000 was that it was the only place I could find a 3 bedroom apartment I could afford.

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