The Feds Say a Dallas Clothing Store Was Actually a Front for Jet-setting Drug Dealer

Categories: Crime, Weed

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There was just something that didn't add up about Debonaire Bros, the retail menswear business Kristian Fitz had registered with the Texas Secretary of State. For one, there didn't seem to be any clothes. Federal agents staked out the store's supposed address, a Red Bird home belonging to Fitz's parents, for several days, failing to spot anything resembling a clothing purchase.

Even if Fitz was selling clothing, that didn't explain why the large stacks of small bills he brought to exchange for $100s at his local Compass Bank reeked so strongly of marijuana that the bank closed his accounts for fear that other customers might start to wonder about the lingering weed smell. It also didn't explain how Fitz, who reported an income of $37,500 to the Texas Workforce Commission, was able to spend five times that much over three years traveling back and forth to L.A. or deposit $372,000 in cash into various bank accounts, or drop six figures on a Bentley.

The Feds came to the obvious conclusion: that Fitz was dealing lots and lots of marijuana. They detail his alleged activities in a forfeiture request filed yesterday in federal court, which seeks to give the U.S. government possession of the Bentley $50,000 worth of jewelry, a Mercedes, a Lexus and $118,000 cash.

According to the filing, Fitz spent his time in L.A. buying large quantities of codeine syrup and kush, which the court filing describes as "a high-quality strain of marijuana originating in the Hindu-Kush mountain range of Afghanistan and Pakistan." These he would ship back to Dallas via UPS or FedEx. He sold the weed from a pair of drug houses on Ramsey Avenue in East Oak Cliff. An informant working with the DEA paid $5,200 per pound.

The investigation of Fitz came to a head on November 28, when federal agents raided his home in Murphy, one of the East Oak Cliff drug houses and the apartment he kept in L.A. There, in addition to the cars, cash, and jewelry, they found drug ledgers, FedEx receipts, documents suggesting that Fitz was laundering money, and, of course, large quantities of marijuana and codeine syrup.

Fitz has not yet been charged with any federal crimes. He does have a lengthy rap sheet in Dallas County with convictions on a dozen or so drug possession charges. He was indicted most recently on November 29, the day after the raids, for possession of more than five pounds of marijuana.


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43 comments
Mark Jansen
Mark Jansen

Tax it and stop ruining peoples lives for FOR-Profit Prison CorpRatCon-Jobs who pay to have favorable laws written or maintained for their Profit-Charter Nihilism.

djredeyedallas
djredeyedallas

Who in the hell taught this guy how to be a criminal?!?!?!?! Keeping receipts???? A storefront that isn't even a store, with no merchandise.?Hell, even the bodegas in NYC have boxes of Bisquick on the shelves!! They may be leftover, dusty boxes form the 80's...but still, they got something on the shelves. Sounds like too many hip-hop videos and not enough common since...jewelry and cars, jewelry and cars......dummy.

ChrisDangerShow
ChrisDangerShow

This is why you WASH THE MONEY before you take it to the bank moron..Jesus, how dumb can you be...

J.R. Bradford
J.R. Bradford

This might sound crazy but the Feds are more likely to hire a person like this than to lock them up.Wouldn't surprise me if they hired him and used him to catch more people that use this same concept.

David Jerome Boring
David Jerome Boring

Street hustling thugs is a byproduct and that product takes no skills to sale!

Jon Jackson
Jon Jackson

Damn....why was I kept out of the loop?

Lindsey Dizzy Whiteside
Lindsey Dizzy Whiteside

You say that, but at least he wasn't just street thugin. I can't help but have a certain modicum of respect for intelligent criminals. It beats the spanx off of the ones that rob you on the street or gas stations. The thing that he was doing is illegal because pot is illegal...if you take that issue out of the picture he is a young enterprising entrepreneur. Imagine what he could have done in the business world had be been pushing legit products.....Personally I hope they figure out a way to refocus his energies into something else instead of locking him up.

Becky L Hunter
Becky L Hunter

OMG To close & not far enough away from where I live.. dude lived in my city. Glad he is GONE now.

Susie Geissler
Susie Geissler

First clue, it was named "Debonaire Bros". It sounds like the name of a drug dealing operation in a Jerry Bruckheimer movie.

CogitoErgoSum
CogitoErgoSum topcommenter

Love the accompanying photo. Sweet nugs!

observist
observist topcommenter

"or drop six figures on a Bentley."

Criminal vanity is the police's BFF.

russell.allison1
russell.allison1

He should have invested in cable TV and watched a few episodes of Breaking Bad, learned from Walt how not to get caught.

Montemalone
Montemalone topcommenter

$325/oz wholesale?

Legalize now!

Get that price down where it should be.

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@ChrisDangerShow 

He must have figured they would do it for him.

You know, full service money laundering complete with Spring Fresh scent!

kyndbrah
kyndbrah

@Lindsey Dizzy Whiteside define intelligent criminal bc it seems to me like he was a fool.  buying a bentley, depositing stinky cash to the bank and not knowing that they might actually ask questions about it aint too bright.

CornyDoggy
CornyDoggy

@Montemalone 

It's not your father's pot.  It's gotten highly scientific and extremely potent

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@Montemalone 

Sooner or later, (and it's getting sooner every day) politicians of all stripes are going to realize that taxed marijuana is the next "Goose that lays the Golden Eggs" and then the fight with the Feds at the DEA will begin to reschedule that drug and take advantage of all of that filthy lucre.

I'm certain that even conservatives will come around once the argument is framed in terms of patriotism and economics. After all, what self -respecting American Con wants to send all of those greenbacks south of the border to those savages in the cartels when we could be enriching bankers and lobbyists with all that dough? Since Washington and Colorado tipped, every one of those pols now has visions of sugarplums and all of those "Kush" dollars in their campaign coffers. (I think I ran across a strain called sugarplum, recently)

But make no mistake, the DEA will be loathe to give up all of that dirty cash that funds their never-ending, family-ruining, self-sustaining, costly, un-winnable, existence-justifying "War On Drugs". But even more than that, they are terrified of losing that particular drug because it is a catch-all lever that is easily used against a certain segment of society that they have a vested interest in keeping a boot on.

I'm guessing that there is a long and dirty fight with the Feds yet to come before we find ourselves buying spleefs at the 7-11.

Lakewooder
Lakewooder

@Montemalone 

No shit brother, that puts the street value at what, $500.00/oz? Who's buying this stuff? Stoners must be pulling in some serious scratch these days. Wonder how kush compares to our cherished, mind bending $35.00/oz Columbian Gold, circa 1970's?

MushMouth1
MushMouth1

@CornyDoggy @Montemalone A really good read is a book called The Botany Of Desire. One section deals with marijuana and how some of the best research in general botany is lost because of our laws.

garlandsucks
garlandsucks

@TheCredibleHulk @Montemalone this scale will tip about the same time taxing marijuana is more profitable/politically acceptable then the prison industrial complex.  The US has 4% of the worlds population and 25% of the worlds prison population.  And we arent even that "safe" to show for it, see newtown see boston massacre pt. 2

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

@TheCredibleHulk @Montemalone I'm convinced that the gov is in on the distribution, either directly, or by looking the other way.  There's a lot of circumstantial evidence/clues, but amazingly little hard evidence.  The industrial scale of drug production, and the amazingly consistent quality are evidence of a global operation.  I'm not saying that it's but a faction that's in anything, but it's not ludicrous.

gmit
gmit

@MushMouth1 @CornyDoggy @Montemalone  

I have read that book, really good! before Michael Polan went off the rails from journalist to activist. We can really thank Ron and Nancy fro the great "strains" of week and the science to make it all happen indoors, because when the outdoor volume went down the quality had to go up to maintain margins.  

....and I do respect that this guy was a through and thoughtful record keeper, because what fun is running a business if you cant strive to be the best 

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@observist @TheCredibleHulk @CornyDoggy @Montemalone 

*hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha*

I love the acoustic version of that song. I hear it every now and again for some science show on PBS.

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@garlandsucks @TheCredibleHulk @Montemalone 

It's there now. The attorney general in California estimated a 3-billion dollar positive impact on the state's economy if weed were legalized. 1.5 billion in taxes that the state collects on legal weed and 1.5 billion dollars saved by not having to lock up stoners and small time dealers.

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