Life-Sized, Wax 'Last Supper' is the Exceedingly Creepy Centerpiece of Fort Worth Museum

WaxLastSupper.jpg
Christian Arts Museum
Before news broke of the brazen murder of Kaufman County District Attorney Mike McLelland and his wife at their home, reporters were doing what they do every agonizingly news-less Easter weekend: scrounging for something to report on, preferably, given the season, religiously oriented.

That's must be what led CBS 11's Joel Thomas to the Christian Arts Museum in Fort Worth this weekend where he discovered that, yes, the sign outside tells the truth: there really is a life-sized wax display of Da Vinci's "The Last Supper."

The display takes up an entire room and features a beatific, flaxen-haired Jesus flanked by his 12 disciples, who are in an uproar following his prediction that one of them (Judas, carrying a money pouch) would betray him.

It was created by wax sculptor Katherine Stubergh in the 1950s at the behest of William Fleming, a Fort Worth oil tycoon who, according to CAC's website, intended it as a "gift to all Christians."

Museum director Ed Malone explained to CBS that Stubergh sewed on the hair and mustaches by hand and used glass eyes. "So that makes them more vibrant whenever you see them." As for Christ's historically inaccurate blond hair: "She felt like that gave more of a divine appearance to Jesus," Malone said. See for yourself:

last-supper-museum-2 (1).jpg
CBS 11

"Most of the time they're kind of awed when they walk around the corner and see all of them at the table," Malone told Thomas. "It grows on you as you sit there and hear the presentation about the Last Supper, it really grows on you. And you begin to see these people come to life." And so can your children, in their nightmares and future therapy sessions.


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35 comments
MissMacy
MissMacy

Am I imagining things, or does Jesus look like Lindsay Lohan with a beard?

Nerdelquis
Nerdelquis

Yeah - I'm not really seeing the "creepy" part here.... and didn't the old Great Southwest Wax Museum in Grand Prarie have one of these, too?

Anna_Merlan
Anna_Merlan

Well, I think Angry Surfer Zombie Jesus looks lovely. 

JackJett
JackJett

It looks like they would have wicks on the top of their heads. 

RWilliams
RWilliams

I remember seeing this display several times as a kid in the 60's. I found it far from creepy. Pretty impressive, as a matter of fact. (Of course, there was no Madame Tussand's on the Turnpike at the time.)

The recorded narration referenced a lot of the painterly "tricks" of shape, color and perspective that da Vinci used in the original mural. I was facinated, and it caused me to seek out other paintings of the same period, which led to the Dutch Masters, which led to. . .

Well, this not-so-creepy wax display provided my first art appreciation course.

jmckee3
jmckee3

So she made Jesus look more "divine" by making him white? Surely there are much better answers to the question than saying the artist was racist like maybe just the artist was an idiot, or the commissioner insisted, anything but the artist thought white people looked more godly.

SnarkySnarkerson
SnarkySnarkerson

Who are all those WHITE people?

And I wasn't aware Palestinians and people of the Levant were so renowned for having blue eyes.

Lakewooder
Lakewooder

Adorn walls with velvet Elvis & dogs playing poker and it's a masterpiece.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

"And so can your children, in their nightmares and future therapy sessions."

Nice snark, Eric.

I guess that you must get some sort of satisfaction by publishing condescending remarks about someone's beliefs.

After all, this was done in the fifties, you might want to look upon it in an historical context.

kduble
kduble

@RWilliams  I remember seeing it in the 60s as a child as well. It was displayed in a store front on Camp Bowie Blvd. I hadn't thought about this in decades!

kduble
kduble

@jmckee3  What about all the Dutch masters paintings in which the saints are wearing renaissance clothing? Artists are inspired by their surroundings and they paint what they know. I'm not saying it's great art or anything, but every work reflects the sensibilities of it's times. Haven't you seen the old movies from the first half of the 20th century in which the woman invariably becomes hysterical, and a single gentlemanly slap brings her back to her senses?

Sotiredofitall
Sotiredofitall topcommenter

@jmckee3Ever been to the Met to view the classical religious art?   This interpretation is not new;  may be wrong, but not new and not particularly interesting.

bmarvel
bmarvel topcommenter

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaulFormer Paul -- It's not religion. it's not history. it's certainly not art. It's a trashy souvenir-shop item, a commemorative plate or figurine writ large. It has its own grotesque charm. But please don't tell us it represents "someone's beliefs," even in the fifties.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

@kduble@jmckee3"the woman invariably becomes hysterical, and a single gentlemanly slap brings her back to her senses?"    those were better times

kduble
kduble

@TheCredibleHulk  I'm not fond of it either, but you're judging a work of 60 years ago with the values of today.

ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul
ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul topcommenter

@TheCredibleHulk  

And of course you are correct about the subjective nature of art.

As art, this piece is succeeding exceedingly well by the passion of the responses which it is eliciting.

Me, touchy? Naah, No way, Not gonna happen ... 8-D

TheCredibleHulk
TheCredibleHulk topcommenter

@ThePosterFormerlyKnownasPaul @TheCredibleHulk @Daniel 

My, aren't we touchy?

Appreciation of art is subjective. This, in my estimation, is shit.

YMMV.


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