"Don't Frack My Park Day" Comes to White Rock This Weekend

Categories: The Environment

FrackCoverRigCutout.jpg
Dallas Residents at Risk will unveil its own version of a frack rig on Saturday.
On Saturday, a tad more than 1,400 people are expected to turn out to clean up their local green space for Dallas' It's My Park Day. The city launched the annual event last year as a way to give neighbors a sense of ownership of their parks and, one assumes, to squeeze a little bit of free labor out of the citizenry.

See also:
- A Moron's Guide to the Fracking of Dallas

Also scheduled to turn out are environmental activists, who plan to use the gathering to remind folks that the city is at this moment consider whether its fracking rules should allow natural gas drilling on parkland and in floodplains. The City Council will decide on those rules any day now, and the gas drilling task force appointed to study the issue recommended allow drilling on some parkland, but not if it's used as a public park or playground.

That's more split-the-baby compromise than outright prohibition, which is what the environmentalists were hoping for.

"It just seems incompatible with having cleanups in parks and all that sort of thing to be allowing something that puts dirty things in the air," said Claudia Meyer, a member of Dallas Residents at Risk helping organize the protest, which they've dubbed Don't Frack My Park Day.

To underline their opposition, Meyer and fellow activists will be accompanied by a 15-foot-tall mock fracking rig that they will plant on Winfrey Point. It's a sort of a Ghost of Christmas Future meant to remind people of what could happen if fracking is allowed on parkland.

"We want to give Dallas residents some idea of what it means to have your local park turned into an industrial zone," Meyer said.

By late morning, the fracking rig will be taken down and reassembled at Valley View Park, where the city is hosting a reception for volunteers. And, just as scantily clad women are the weapon of choice for PETA, Meyer promises the rig will become a fixture at local anti-fracking protests.


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10 comments
pak152
pak152

so why White Rock? is it to scare the public? has any E&P firm filed a plan to drill in that area?

mcnadallas
mcnadallas

What the gas companies want right now (with the proposed gas drilling ordinance) is a toe hold into Dallas County.  Look at what they have done so far in Fort Worth.   Do you want a rig 300 feet from your bedroom?  That's what they really want and that's what they have done.  And, oh yeah, and do you think those neighbors are happy with there chump change royalty checks, when they were promised they would be rolling in dough? 

 

Where's the transparency for the City of Dallas?  Can Mary Suhm post on the city website a cost benefit analysis for all of us to see?  I would like to see how we net anything after the road repairs, increased demand for water cleanup, orphaned wells, emergency response needs, earthquakes from wastewater injection, health problems of nearby residents gettting sick, worker injury, illness and death, air pollution far from the well head, the broader economic impacts to the value of residents' homes at risk, drinking water contamination for groundwater, water replacement and water treatment costs, and damage to natural resources, such as White Rock Lake and the Trinity River, habitat loss and fragmentation, and contributon to global warming.   I want to see Mary Suhm's accounting.

mollytexas
mollytexas

If urban drilling was going so well, there wouldn't be so much opposition to it. This has happened as the direct result of many, many bad experiences and negative impacts from unconventional gas drilling/fracking/production/storage/distribution etc. to health, air quality, water supplies, property values, and quality of life. It is a highly industrial activity that is incompatible with urban areas and parklands. There is a large and increasing amount of information available online about the problems, including a regularly updated local blog at http://www.texassharon.com/ , reports at http://www.earthworksaction.org/library/detail/natural_gas_flowback, and http://www.earthworksaction.org/files/publications/FINAL-US-enforcement-sm.pdf which makes clear that our state environmental agency is not protecting us. And with fracking related activities exempted from many federal laws, urban dwellers must rely on their city to adopt ordinances to protect them and our natural resources.

claytonauger
claytonauger

Why do you insist on calling neighborhood residents "environmentalists?" Ms. Meyer is a member of the Mountain Creek Neighborhood Alliance. Almost every major neighborhood association is a member of the Dallas Residents at Risk coalition. These are people trying to protect where they live.

TXsharon
TXsharon

If you think fracking will keep your property taxes lower, you might check with other areas that have already been fracked. 

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

The city needs the money and we're getting pretty good at urban drilling.  Fracking for fun and profit.  Beats the hell out of jacking up property taxes to the moon.  Our rates are already in low-Earth orbit.

 

The city ought to charge a vendor booth fee.  Put these clowns in a tent row.  The Free Tibeters, the Bearded Woman, right next to the Dog-faced Boy.

pak152
pak152

 @mollytexas "There is a large and increasing amount of information available online about the problems, including a regularly updated local blog" except that the information is highly biased towards the anti-fracking position

claytonauger
claytonauger

Has you've made clear, you're the strange one here, gas pimp. They're going to have to have security to keep you from humping the damn thing.

pak152
pak152

 @claytonauger oooh "gas pimp" that's a new one, I guess it replaces "shill" as the nom de jour

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