Man Dies In Custody After Lengthy Struggle With Dallas Cop

Categories: Crime

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The incident report on DPD's public access website regarding Marshall Moreno's death is bare-bones. Yesterday at 4:47 p.m., the 43-year-old died at Baylor Hospital of unknown causes, and his body was taken to the medical examiner's office for an autopsy.

But the cause of Moreno's death isn't quite as obscure as the incident report indicates. As police explained in a news release this evening, Moreno died while in custody after a prolonged struggle with officers.

According to police, Officer Albert Sanchez was working an off-duty job at a Circle K convenience store at 5527 E. R.L. Thornton Freeway when he was approached by Moreno's mother, who told him her son was on drugs and she needed help. Moreno was sitting in the passenger seat of his mother's car when Sanchez approached.

Moreno stepped out of the vehicle, claimed Sanchez was "out to get him," then bolted across Winslow Avenue. Sanchez radioed for help as he followed Moreno through the parking lot of a Shell station before tackling him from behind as he ran toward I-30. A passerby attempted to help subdue Moreno, who continued to struggle as backup arrived.

The officers yelled at Moreno, telling him to calm down and show them his hands, but he refused. Sanchez pulled out his can of pepper spray and dosed Moreno as he continued to struggle. He was finally handcuffed after Sanchez delivered several knee strikes and other officers helped to hold his ankles to prevent him from kicking.

It was only once they had Moreno handcuffed that police realized his breathing was shallow. An ambulance delivered him to the Baylor, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. The cause of death will be determined by the medical examiner.

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42 comments
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

There are less lethal ways to bring down an unruly person.  The cops are gun happy.

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

" But the cause of Moreno's death isn't quite as obscure as the incident report indicates...."  Article then goes on to illuminate the circumstances surrounding Moreno's arrest and subsequent demise.

 

Key word in the quote is "cause".  Only an MD can determine cause of death for an official report.  Anything else put into the police report is speculation.  Was it the drugs he was on?  Was it exertion leading to heart attack?  Was it the pepper spray?  Was it the tactics used by the police officers to subdue the man?  Long story short, (too late, I know)  even after your lengthy article to the contrary, the 'cause' of Moreno's death is still obscure.

MikeWestEast
MikeWestEast

Where were these people when the rest of us got the very simple message understood by everybody from John Gotti's family to Mitt Romney's family to President Obama's family: getting into a physical fight with police is the quickest way to get very seriously injured or dead. Whatever you think your legal situation is, it never ever gets better when you assault a police officer. They have expensive, well-made weapons, they know how to use them, and can use lethal force without a superior officer's order. Right and wrong are not relevant. Smart and stupid are. Smart means cuffed and then out on bail. Stupid is lying in the street with the EMT's bending over you.

whiteguiltliberal
whiteguiltliberal

I notice that you blithering white-guilt libtard "journalists" totally failed to mention the fact that a Dallas Police officer was shot twice this last Tuesday in the "Five Points" section 8 apartment ghetto shit zone near Greenbille Avenue and Park Lane. That's the same Section 8 ghetto apartment shit zone that has the "walking trail" that The Observer libtards wrote about las week, the "walking trail" that attracts so many "vagrants" like the homeless African illegal immigrant who beat another homeless dude to death with a tree last week.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

Are these incidents occurring with more frequency now, or are they being reported more?  Out of control cops; a scary prospect.  

whiteguiltliberal
whiteguiltliberal

Another future rocket scientist or cancer-curing doctor MURDERED by the RACIST PIGS! Our civilization CANNOT SURVIVE without the VITALLY IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTIONS these people make to our society!

gardencafetx
gardencafetx

@Dallas_Observer guns drawn arrest at fair park dart station just now. Undercover and helicopter involved. What happened?!

Sharon_Moreanus
Sharon_Moreanus topcommenter

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz gun happy? The guy was maced.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @whiteguiltliberal A man who happened to be a cop.  I got the impression that he was not uniformed at the time.  That IS relevant

Sharon_Moreanus
Sharon_Moreanus topcommenter

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz Myrna.Minkoff-Katz is wrong again and a scary prospect.

Skinnydogperson
Skinnydogperson

@Myrna.Minkoff-Katz So how is assuming the cops are in the wrong because they are cops any different from deciding someone is guilty of a crime because they are black? This guys own mother could not control him and feared he would harm himself or her.

JSSS
JSSS

Out of control cops? Wow, talk about leaping to a conclusion. Yeah, the out-of-control cop minding his own business is sought out by the guy's mother because the guy "was on drugs and she needed help."  Then the guy exits the car and runs from the police. When caught, the guy fights with the cop to the extent that a "passerby" tries to assist the cop.

Let me thank both the officer for protecting the mother and the community by attepmting to arrest this guy and the passerby that assisted the officer.

TheJeremyAdams
TheJeremyAdams

 @whiteguiltliberal Must you troll from thousands of miles away?  Also, WTF is your problem?  This article does not place blame on anyone, but states that he had a struggle with the police after running from the police and being subdued.  It was then noticed that he has shallow breathing and was transported to Baylor where he died.  The body was transfered to the Medical Examiner for autopsy.  So where in this article are any words used that call for your venomous remarks ass hole.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @AdultBabies Idiot.  If the cops are culpable, certainly the punishment is excessive for the crime.  There is a question whether they even had the cause to chase him.  He, like all Americans is entitled to due process, he won't get that either.   Your cavalier comment shows you to be the most callous of souls.  If you wanna respond that life causes one callouses, that's true enough, but you get what you give.

CraigT42
CraigT42

 @Sharon_Moreanus Dont look for logic from the Fat-cat.  she not only doesn't use it, she finds it offensive.

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

 @scottindallas 1) That isn't even the issue I'm addressing.  2) I wasn't there, so I don't know.

 

I'm addressing the implication by the writer that the police report is deliberately vague as to the cause of death.  The police cannot, and should not, for this very reason, attribute the cause of death in their initial reports.  That is what a Coroner's report is for.

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

 @scottindallas  @AdultBabies I think you're putting the cart before the horse as much as anyone else is.  So quick to jump to the side opposite the police, without any facts to back you up.  Why did he run?  What did he have to run from?  What drove his mother to seek help in dealing with him?  Why did he struggle against the cops once caught?  Did the actions of the police cause his death, or was it a result of the drugs his mother stated he was on?  If his death ends up being linked to the drugs, then he himself abrogated his due process rights.  The cops in the situation, as explained in the article, followed proper procedure.  It was a foot chase, not a car chase.  The use of mace, overwhelming force and knee strikes are approved and time tested means of subduing a struggling subject.  And you do want the police to be able to subdue struggling subjects, the alternative is not pretty.

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

 @scottindallas  @MikeWestEast Terry v. Ohio.  Reasonable suspicion.  A police officer who has a reasonable suspicion (a man's own mother attesting that her son is 'on drugs') that a person has been, is, or will be involved in a crime, may detain that person.  Further, the officer may use reasonable force (knee strikes, mace) to effect the detention.  US Supreme Court case.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @RTGolden1  @AdultBabies Sophist, and sophistry is a term of art.  I know of no synonym for the word.   In short, it refers to one who argues without concern for facts, reality or the hard work of getting something right, rather they use fallacious appeals to win the argument, even if they're full of crap.  It implies lying, deceit, and a utter lack of concern for fair play.   The thesaurus lists "deception, fallacy, and misconception," but none of those get to the broader use of each of these in argumentation.  It was sophists who killed Socrates.  And, in a world of logic, there is no greater evil than sophistry.  If you know of another more accurate, and less pejorative word, tell me. 

 

I worked as a bouncer for a few years and though I'm 6 ft and 180 lbs, I noticed that many of my coworkers just wanted to fight, and did so inelegantly.  I, on the other hand would lightly put my hand on the back of their elbow and then tell them they had to leave.  Never had an issue.  Most of my co-workers would assault the unruly customer and a sprawling fight would no doubt ensue.  I know police don't have that luxury, but it's indicative of their condition.  I was playing rugby at the time and got all the physical altercation my ego needed, these guys, obviously were looking for it. 

 

Another funny episode related to a teammate at a party that was convinced his buddy was hitting on his girlfriend.  The guy was an academically ineligible defensive lineman.  Four of my teammates each picked a limb, I (shrooming my ass off, and dressed in an oversized diaper--it was Halloween) put him in a sleep hold, turned his head to the side (he was on his belly) so he'd not suffocate in the mud.  He was out the 3-5 seconds and awoke unaware of what had just happened.  (I always considered myself among the least intimidating on the team, but was tickled that I--with a substantial assist, was the guy who knocked him out.) 

 

Perhaps I'm biased, but I've had too many experiences with cops to deem most of them to the likes of the bouncers I worked with.  I appreciate they have hard jobs, and understand jumping a guy after a heated chase, but this didn't sound like that.  Many of my old teammates are cops today, and most of them are great cops.  One was suspended in Houston when a group of them clipped a fleeing gangbanger.  The cops stood around and kicked the kid, and I'm proud to say, my former teammate was the one who jumped on him, restrained his arms and cuffed them.  He was still suspended and had to go before repeated panels to get reinstated.  I felt for him, but not for the others.  He lead with his body, and in a way protected the perp with his own body; though that wasn't his intention.  He just did his job. 

 

I'm not judging too harshly, and I agree that neither of us know what happened.  I'm not saying the cops did wrong, but I do think most officers are poorly trained.  I appreciate your story about training your fellow soldiers about better methods. 

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

 @scottindallas  @AdultBabies You make good points.  Right up until your usual tactic of declaring anyone not of your own opinion to be a sophist.  You've pretty much overused that term to the point where, coming from you, the word sophist barely has any meaning at all.

Wrestling, Judo, and Grappling are all excellent methods of gaining control of a subject or antagonist.  I wrestled competitively for over 20 years, taught it to my soldiers when in the Army.  This doesn't negate the effectiveness of strikes.  Strikes, like everything else a police officer carries, are tools in the bag.  You weren't on the scene.  You can't make the determination if strikes were necessary or not.  Neither can I.  Perhaps you are correct, and the officer skipped all other methods at his disposal and went straight to the more desperate and easy to perform, if not most effective means of dispatch.  Perhaps not.

To answer your final question: Yes.  In our current legal system, the entire point is to be able to enumerate which point of law in your favor most appeals to the subjective mind of either the Jurist or the members of the jury.  It's infuriating at times, but that is how the system works, and it works pretty well most of the time.  If that doesn't sit well with you, work to change it.  Don't bother arguing the point with me, I have more immediate concerns to deal with.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @AdultBabies  @RTGolden1 Dumbass, simply striking someone leaves them able to grab a weapon, or to retaliate.  Where as wrestling, or Judo, occupies their hands and constrains them.  I found myself in many engagements with guys far larger than myself, but I was able to keep them from hitting me, though they were trying with all their ability.  I've been kneed, speared and the like, and I've done it.  I was excessive and served no purpose other than vengeance.  I understand it in some pursuits, but we pay and train cops to restrain their basest, personal agendas.  Hell, vigilantes are more professional than that.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @AdultBabies Sorry, pussy, I know how to grab an ear, hair, eye gouge, not to mention wrestle, judo and over a decade of Rugby, where I occasionally got to kick cop's asses, after they couldn't beat us on the scoreboard and tried to get "rough" with us.  I left those bloated, hotheaded assholes in a crumpled heap, with my cleat marks on his chest.   All so I could get on with the game and dispatch them most effectively, and quickly. 

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @RTGolden1  @AdultBabies I didn't make the Due process argument.  But the case simply says that the 4th amendment is a better refuge for the argument (according to that oracle of legal thought, Wikipedia)  But, again, knee blows are poor training.  Judo, Grappling, Wrestling are all far superior.   The distinction in the case you cite is the lowest form of intellectual cowardice--in that saying, "oh, you fool, you argued on 8th Amendment grounds not 4th.  If you'd argued 4th, you would've won."    That is petty and the height of sophistry.  When Law is applied this way, it justifies the hatred many have for lawyers, judges and the legal system.  A rose by any other name... just as if our rights are violated, do we need to be able to enumerate which clause most appeals to the subjective mind of the Jurist? 

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

 @scottindallas  @AdultBabies The Supreme Court disagrees.  Graham v. Connor.  This case also throws out your due process argument in situations like this.

 

Again,  until the ME releases his report, anything tossed into the mix is pure speculation.  I wasn't there so I cannot make an informed assertion that the knee strikes were reasonable force in this case.  I can however, quite clearly, point out that just because you think they're dangerous, unneeded and excessive doesn't make it so.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @RTGolden1  @AdultBabies The use of knee strikes is bad form, and isn't the most effective way to subdue someone--nor are nightstick blows to a suspect.  It's dangerous, unneeded and excessive. 

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