Elizabeth Escalona, Who Glued Her Daughter's Hands to the Wall, Gets 99 Years in Prison

Categories: Crime

Elizabeth escalona.jpg
Elizabeth Escalona's mugshot
Elizabeth Escalona, the 23-year-old mother of five accused of torturing her two-year-old daughter Jocelyn Cedillo, has been sentenced to 99 years in prison, several news outlets are reporting.

According to Scott Goldstein at the Dallas Morning News , one of several reporters who's been live-tweeting the trial for the past few days, the judge told Escalona that the sentence came down to a single fact: "You savagely beat your child to the edge of death."

Escalona was apparently punishing her daughter for a potty-training issue. She plead guilty in July to felony injury to a child. According to Jocelyn's siblings, before Escalona glued the girl's hands to the wall, she hit Jocelyn with a belt and a shoe, dragged her around by her feet, kicked her and hit her in the stomach with a jug of milk. The little girl also suffered extreme bruising, bite marks and bleeding on the brain, and was in a coma for several days after the attack.

The case generated an intense amount of interest, with every single horrible detail relentlessly covered by the local daily news outlets, as well the Associated Press, Huffington Post, USA Today and the Daily Mail. There's also a 6,000 person Facebook group, Lock Up Elizabeth Escalona.

It's been a monstrously sad and depressing week of testimony, in which jurors were told about Escalona and her sister suffering sexual abuse at the hands of their father, who's now in prison for a sexual offense against an unrelated child. Escalona's mother Ofelia and sister Margaret also took the stand and pleaded with the judge for leniency.

On the other side, prosecutor Eren Price repeatedly described Escalona as "a monster" and ordered her to look at photographs of her daughter's injuries, telling her, "If you can do it, you can look at it."

Escalona also testified, against her attorney's advice. She admitted to hitting and kicking her daughter. But she asked Judge Larry Mitchell for a "second opportunity," she said, "to show you I'm not the monster everybody thinks I am. I'm asking from the bottom of my heart to give me a second opportunity."

Some abuse cases shine a light on the failures of the systems meant to keep children safe. That was the case in the death of Marchella Pierce, a four-year-old Brooklyn girl who died in 2010 weighing just 18 pounds. An investigation later revealed that child welfare workers had failed to visit her family for months before she died, despite many indications that she was at risk; her mother, Carlotta Brett-Pierce, later admitted to tying her to the bed at night to keep her from "making a mess."

Clearly Escalona is a profoundly disturbed woman who doesn't belong anywhere near her children, despite her family's pleas for leniency. But it's tough to see what larger lesson we can take from this case, and what the purpose was for the unrelenting media coverage we saw this week. Instead, we're left with a window into one woman's terrible, disturbing crimes, and many questions, which will remain unanswered, about how they could have been prevented.


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14 comments
Roxie
Roxie

99 years isn't enough.....She will rot in prison as she should!

roo_ster
roo_ster

If only she had hacked off her daughter's limbs or drowned them in the bathtub, she would have gotten of easier.

 

This is just another example of why we ought not have as our policy taxpayer-subsidized mass bastardy.  She had five kids to abuse daily?  Were it not for social programs, she would not have had the time to get knocked up that many times before she starved to death. 

 

Disgusting.

 

OWH wrote, "Three generations of imbeciles are enough," in justifying Buck vs Bell.  I am not in favor of gov't action like forced sterilization, but could we please stop subsidizing this sort of behavior?

steve.sandwich
steve.sandwich

She is clearly disturbed.   She never had a chance to know good parenting, much less be one.  I'd much rather see the child placed in foster care, and this girl allowed to be taught how to be a person.  

ozonelarryb
ozonelarryb

The whole episode is 'Red state pride'.  with the Angela Yates, Plano nut, etc.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

Isn't this an excessive sentence?  Murderers seldom get 99 years.  I know this is awful, but it would seem 20-30 years would keep her locked up past childbearing age.

texp
texp

"Some abuse cases shine a light on the failures of the systems meant to keep children safe...."

 

It is unclear to me what the point of this paragraph is.  Are you implying that THIS specific crime is a result of a CPS system failure?  If so, why don't you provide the information to support that assertion instead of talking about a different case in a different state? What does that case have to do with this one? 

 

If there is evidence that child welfare workers were delinquent in their responsibilities in THIS case... that they investigated and closed the case, or ignored prior reports of maltreatment.... you should present that information here, because CPS failure in this case is definitely not implied by the delinquent actions of CPS caseworkers in New York on an unrelated case from two years ago.  If there ISN'T information suggesting that CPS was at fault in this case, then this whole paragraph is apropos of nothing in the context of this article.  

 

Montemalone
Montemalone topcommenter

23 and 5 kids? Should have glued her own knees together.

justice
justice

I have been following this case from PA, and I don't think the national coverage was "unrelenting" at all.  I had to dig for the past few days to get any information about it, and had not heard the story until a week ago. Everything I saw repeated the same AP post so was really the same story, just repeated by maybe 4 outlets.  Maybe the purpose of this annoying, "unrelenting" coverage is that we the people want to make sure our justice system works.  The wide range of punishments from probation to life she could have recieved was really one reason I paid attention.  But I guess the author was offended somehow that so many people were interested in justice for little Jocelyn.

mavdog
mavdog topcommenter

this is just a sad, horrible story but there really isn't any "justice" in the outcome.

 

there isn't any justice for the victim, she continues to suffer without a parent and a solid family unit.

 

there isn't any justice for society, as society now has the obligation of taking care of not only the victim but now society takes care of the guilty party as well. for the rest of her life it would seem.

 

there is no repayment of debt by the guilty party, she is denied her freedom but also doesn't do anything to compensate for what she has done.

 

Don't have any answers, but I sure know a complete and total failure when I see it.

Scruffygeist
Scruffygeist

 @justice Locally unrelenting, dingus. Hence the "Dallas" in the title of the Observer. You are aware of how local news circlejerks any story of this type, right? 

RTGolden1
RTGolden1 topcommenter

 @justice This is a local outlet.  From our perspective, the coverage has been non-stop.  Maybe 'unrelenting' was a poor choice of words.

 

I don't know how you take that the author was 'offended' by the notion of justice for jocelyn.  I took from it that the author was saddened by the whole affair, overwhelmed by a sense of powerlessness we all feel when things like this happen.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @AdultBabies  @mavdog I'm advocating fiscally sensible policies.  I'm making a cynical argument.   You're the one so fond of pathetic arguments, "tell that to your daughter/babysitter."

mavdog
mavdog topcommenter

 @AdultBabies

 

I'm sure you can get help for that "bleeding hart" of yours.

 

bwahahahahaha

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