Study: By 2030, Six of Ten Texans Will Be Obese

fat-people.jpg
Obligatory picture of anonymous fat people.
Quick: What day is it today? If you answered Tuesday or September 18, you're technically right but you're actually very, tragically wrong, because it's National Cheeseburger Day which a) exists and b) is a great opportunity to check out a new burger joint. It's also, perhaps, time to reflect on the consequences of living in a country where every day is Cheeseburger Day.

The Trust For America's Health just released a report titled "F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2012," which, as you may be able to tell, is not exactly celebration of our nation's expanding waistline. The Star-Telegram reported the story with the headline that Texas is the 10th fattest state in the country, but the report's not about how fat we already are; it's about how fat we're going to be.

And how fat is that? Pretty damn fat. Every single state will have an obesity rate or 44 percent or above, with Mississippi topping the list at 66.7 percent. Texas, at 57.7 percent, is considerably lower than that, but still. In 18 years, six out of every 10 people you see walking waddling steering a motorized vehicle down the street will be obese.

With the increased rate of obesity will come a corresponding increase in the rate of obesity-related disease. The study predicts that, over the next 20 years, obesity will contribute to 2.9 million new cases of type 2 diabetes; 5.7 million cases of heart disease; 5.7 million cases of hypertension; and 800,000 new cases of cancer. Related health-care costs will grow by 17.1 percent.

The report does contain a kernel of good news: Texas will drop 11 slots on the state-by-state obesity list. So even though we're getting fatter, we're doing so more slowly that other states which counts as a victory.

The Trust For America's Health also holds out hope that we can reduce our average BMI by five percent, the rough equivalent of everyone losing 10 pounds. That would spare a couple of million Texans from chronic disease and save $54 billion in health care costs over 20 years.

Then again, doing all that would require some combination of eating a proper diet and exercising, both of which we will get to work on right away. Right after Cheeseburger Day.


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14 comments
BigOoch
BigOoch

RT @TONGUEmyTATTS Yea you should be worried RT @BigOoch: RT @Dallas_Observer: Study: By 2030, Six of Ten Texans Will Be Obese

Jeremy
Jeremy

Guess I'm working in the office of the future.  3/4 of the people I work with are morbidly obese.  Everyday they have another excuse to roll out the buffet and start feasting the moment they get in.  Have you ever seen a huge woman eating ribs sloshing in a pan of grease at 7:30 a.m.? I have, and it's delightful.  The best part - you can't say anything about it because some pig might find it offensive and decide to file a lawsuit.  My only solice is that most of these people will expire due to natural causes in a few years after costing all of us a fortunre in medical costs.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

Why do I get the feeling our vaunted statesmen are bowing up to use this new healthcare act to . . . modify our behavior.  To "encourage" us to make . . . better choices.

 

Either that or the First Lady will bring her big butt and a bad attitude to the food fight.

ObserverHatesFacts
ObserverHatesFacts

Oh and cancer is #1 cause of death for "hispanics" 

 

Wonder if there is any correlation..

sidewinder
sidewinder

By 2030 we'll all be living on varmints, road kill, and berries. We'll all be skinny as hell just like in those depression era Library of Congress photos.

Scruffygeist
Scruffygeist

The bigger surprise is 6 of 10 aren't already.

chad
chad

I need to get in the diabetes biz

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

and, by 2100, 11 of 10 texans will be obese

sidewinder
sidewinder

 @holmantx someone needs to modify behavior if they are getting their healthcare paid for by everyone (paid for by the government). 90 percent of the factors determining whether someone needs medical resources are based upon lifestyle choices. once you realize this you have a moral imperative to (1) make healthy choices or (2) decline government healthcare assistance. since most people are far from capable of acting in such a responsibly manner you need to (1) impose lifestyle changes or (2) get rid of government healthcare or (3) maintain the status quo and encourage behavior that is crippling our nation's ability to function. This ain't "littering" type bad behavior we're talking about here, thse are trillion dollar expenditures over just a few years time.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin topcommenter

 @scottindallas well you know, no matter how we look in life, we all end up looking the same in death, a scrawny little skeleton of bones in a coffin 6ft deep

gmit
gmit

 @sidewinder  @holmantx Jackass, your either in one of two pools

 

To forget that the insured healthy are also paying for the insured unhealthy is missing 3/4 of the argument, how many women over 30 do you know that arent on at least 2 daily pills, and the old men with the dicks that dont work, thats a medical condition too. But hey keep bitching about the government because it feels good  think your smart and your point of view is the only one 

 

Thanks to the boomers, getting old is now a medical condition 

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