Gary Johnson, the Presidential Candidate Who 'Agrees With You 100 Percent,' Will Be in Dallas This Week

Categories: Campaign News

GaryJohnson.jpg
Pop quiz: Which presidential candidate, whose name will appear on the ballot in all 50 states, paid his way through college as a door-to-door handyman? Which one earned the nickname "Governor Veto" by rejecting more than 750 bills passed by his state's legislature? Which one competed in a re-enactment of the Bataan Death March and lived to tell about it? And which one loves marijuana so much he wants to legalize it?

If you said Mitt Romney to any of the above questions, you're an idiot. Same with Barack Obama. The answer is former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson, the Libertarian Party's candidate in the 2012 presidential election.

You've probably heard little or nothing about Johnson. That's because the lamestream media, being tools of the two-party establishment, systematically ignore his existence. So, to catch you up, Johnson is the extremely fiscally conservative Republican who believes in abolishing the IRS, minimizing intervention in foreign countries, and promoting civil liberties. Oh, and per his campaign video, he is "the only candidate who agrees with you 100 percent."

If you want to know more specifics, you can visit his campaign website. Or, you can ask him in person, seeing as his campaign will swing through Texas this week.

He'll be in Odessa on Tuesday, which is a bit of a drive, but he's scheduled to be at The Free Man in Deep Ellum at 7 p.m. Wednesday before making his way to the Park City Club the next morning for for a 7:30 breakfast. Two more Thursday stops follow in Fort Worth, at 4 p.m. at Pop's Safari Room and at Joe T. Garcia's at 7:30 p.m., before Johnson makes his way to Austin, San Antonio and Houston.

All but the Safari Room will cost you $50, which is quite the bargain for rubbing elbows with a presidential candidate. It's a helluva lot cheaper, at least, than having dinner with Romney.


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43 comments
morrainepeak
morrainepeak

 @jerikjonnson  Poverty rates in New Mexico are among the highest in the nation exceeded only by Missippi, Puerto Rico and parts of DC. The PCIG (per capita income gap NM Metro Vs. Non-metro )was lowest in 1969 and highest in 2000, according to RUPRI state domographic and economic profiles. Other sources of info include the American Legislative Exchange Council and Census 2000 Bureau of Economic Analysis.  Don't make others do your homework for you.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

Libertarians shut out the real problems of a dystopian world and live a fantasy that life is beautiful all the time.

holmantx
holmantx topcommenter

Johnson at the Free Man, eh?  I'll be there.  He holds the record for vetoes.  

 

I met him several years ago.  We were both naked at the time.  I said, you look familiar.  He said, I'm the governor!

 

the governor of what?

 

the state!

 

Lose the Gross sales receipts tax and you your state income tax, and you might be able to hang on to your doctors.

 

We were in the showers at Fort Marcy Park (sports facility), north of the Roundhouse (state capital) in Santa Fe, New Mexico circa 2000.

morrainepeak
morrainepeak

New Mexico has been economically depressed since 1975.  If it wasn't for the two national labs and Air Force bases, the state would be the economic equivalent of Bangladesh.  Except for his legendary pot smoking as a student at UNM, Gov. Johnson is an otherwise undistinguished local figure.  His tenure as governor saw the largest mass exodus of professionals from the state, increasing multigenerational endemic heroin addction (and crime) in the northern counties, and the closure of an iconic 100 year old  Albuquerque hospital due to bankruptcy...leaving only the decimation of an above average public school system to his predecessor, Gov. Richardson 

Ironically, the 30% of New Mexico residents not on welfare or living off of daddy's trust fund in Santa Fe or Taos (talk about a gap between rich and poor!) regard Gov, Rick Perry as a distinguished politician.  Be careful what you wish for Amigos.

RTGolden
RTGolden

Nice Eric, take a chance to shed some light on a viable 3rd party candidate, maybe point out that if we really want our government to change we HAVE to vote 3rd, 4th, and 5th party candidates into office; but you take the easy route, try to be cute and blow it.

 

Try doing some research, find out what got America into the situation we're in, and what it will take to get us out.  I'll give you a headstart:  What got us into the situation we're in is 200+ years of the same two parties in control of the government.  Aided and abetted by a fellow traveler press that can always be counted on to spin things in just the right way for their favored plutocrats.

trudat
trudat

Libertarian.......isn't that like a Republican who's in favor of legalizing prostitution and marijuana??? 

balzerjohn
balzerjohn

Gary Johnson has something unseen in recent presidents and presidential candidates . . . common sense. America sits on the precipice of financial ruin and along comes a guy that has a plan to balance the budget in one year. Who can't like that? His plans include abolishing the IRS and creating a fair tax. That alone would provide the jump start the economy needs. Gary Johnson needs more national recognition. If he can achieve a 15% rating he will be permitted into the national debates with Obama and Romney. That is when we will see this race become very exciting.

cynicaloldbastard
cynicaloldbastard

Isn't W a member of the Park City Club?  Wonder if he'll show up to ask some questions.

jtall66
jtall66

 @morrainepeak

 And high taxes and more government spending fix this problem?  Or raising the floor instead of the ceiling will work better.  Go Garry Johnson!

nacnudnod
nacnudnod

 @Myrna.Minkoff-Katz 

 

Not just another "libertarian" kook.  He is a two term Governor of New Mexico who helped balance the budget every year he was in office.  He has more experience governing than the last two presidents combined did before they were president.  He believes in less war, and more financial responsibility.  Overall Accomplishments Left office with New Mexico as one of the only four states in the country with a balanced budgetLeft New Mexico with a budget surplus

RTGolden
RTGolden

 @trudat No, they're basically socially liberal and fiscally conservative (Tea Party interlopers notwithstanding), generally constitutionalist, freedom-lovers.  They're the bane of the Republicans, because a true libertarian believes the government should get the hell out of people's private lives, and a thorn to democrats because they believe government should be held accountable for the taxes it collects and spends.  They're not perfect, by any means, but they're a hell of a lot more sensible than either major party.

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @balzerjohn A fair tax won't jump start anything, but put yet another regressive tax on the middle class.  Yet another tax that hits the middle and poorer classes at 100% while only hitting a fraction of the wealthy.  The libertarians are their own worst enemy.  Again, explain how a national sales tax will spur anything?  We're talking about a tax rate of 16% on everything to come close to being on par with present revenues.  The math on this stuff is easy, but again, it's advocates are not very math friendly, including some accountants I've heard suggest this asinine program--they tend to think less than 10% would do. 

morrainepeak
morrainepeak

 @jtal66 Tax the 34% of New Mexico residents below the poverty line? ...or the 52% of NM children in poverty?  Incidentally, the ALEC adressed this very  problem in NM in 2007 and gave the state an "F" grade in the area of taxation and govt. spending.

Myrna.Minkoff-Katz
Myrna.Minkoff-Katz topcommenter

 @nacnudnod Governing a state with a tiny population, and its notorious for the mistreatment of Native Americans and Mexican Americans, hardly qualifies Johnson to run a complex, diverse nation.

morrainepeak
morrainepeak

You are a prime example of the terminal effects cerebral toxoplasmosis.  You should have started cleaning the cat-box 2 years ago.

morrainepeak
morrainepeak

Really? Growth in what sectors, exactly?  Enrollment in state colleges has follwed a steady decline since 1990..  Poverty has increased.  a major Alb. newspaper has folded.Oh yeah, there was a boom in Indian Casino building which otherwise blighted the scenary of the Camino Royale with faux peublo architecture.  A few more pensoners from California found their way to Las Cruces or Silver City.  Real estate bubbled and burst with the legendary Vaughn Co. swindle of a few years back and of course feedlots increased exponentially in Eastern New Mexico. Tourism by Texans has slightly increased in Ruidoso.  Real growth? Sorry no sale...

mavdog
mavdog topcommenter

A consumption tax is the most efficient tax, it doesn't discourage investment or favor one sector of the economy over others.

 

A consumption tax can be structured to also be progressive in the sense that basics could easily be exempted. It's not hard to implement in this manner, we do it already on the state level by exempting unprepared food. The higher income earners would not be able to use the tax code to get out of paying taxes, unless they never purchased anything but food. Think that will ever be the case? no, and that is why a consumption tax makes a ton of sense.

 

If you stop and consider how the costs to tabulate and report income in order to file will suddenly vanish (sorry accountants, you'll have a lot more free time on your hands...), the benefits are huge.

jctevere
jctevere

 @scottindallas Did you just make up these numbers? You sound like you're rehashing things you have learned from professors, which is incorrect. 1) Our "underground economy" will finally be taxed, which is estimated to be at least 10% of our GDP (even though I think its MUCH larger). Additionally, if things like marijuana are legalized, it can also be taxed. Poorer classes taxed at 100% - that's just propaganda, food and necessities can be flat-tax free or poor can be given tax-free vouchers for said items. The only reasons accountants find the program asinine is because you will no longer need that many and they will have useless degrees. 

nacnudnod
nacnudnod

 @scottindallas How is an income tax fair.  Many of the richest in the country have no income.  Or what they make is from investments (many of which are tax exempt).  How many of the Kennedy clan just live off the money that was acquired from earlier generations.  Same with many trust fund kids.  But I guarantee you those people spend more money than the poor and would have a much higher tax burden.  Also the NST would remove all income and corporate taxes.  Which would amount to a pay increase for almost every working American.  As well as lower prices for all goods that had been taxed many times before getting to the consumer.  It would also tax illegal aliens, drug dealers, prostitutes and anyone else who is earning their money in an illegal way. 

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @balzerjohn just wanted to state that I may well vote for this guy.  As far off as he is with his national sales tax, he's more realistic than the two party abortion we get

morrainepeak
morrainepeak

I would also like to point out the Albuquerque Journal Online article of Sept. 14, 2011 "New Mexico Near Bottom for Poverty Rate".  The comments regarding local politicians by the readers are revealing.  Instead of making things better for New Mexico, many of the state and local politicians : Richardson, Udall , Heinrich etc(,who are Not natives), merely use their offices as a "stepping stone" to a higher national platform.

morrainepeak
morrainepeak

@johnspivey: The 34% excludes those directly employed by the state or federal govt (see initial comment regading Natl Labs and AFBs).  The real challange for NM politicians has been to actually create a more diverse economy in NM. (beyond tourism,etc.)  Since 1969, that has not happened.  Also, many Indian reservations/pueblos are in Bernallilo and Santa Fe County along the I25 corridor (also the most populous of NM's counties). @Scottindallas: the migration of wealth to Santa Fe mainly by moneyed  individuals/retirees from both coasts has created a middle class housing shortage in Santa Fe  due to artificial escalation of property values (making housing unaffordable for the ave. NM native - "Aspen-ization").San Juan County has been persistently 10% above the poverty  line due to mineral resources/natural gas etc.

johnhspivey
johnhspivey

 @morrainepeak The information I find from the US Census shows 17.1% living under poverty levels in 2008.  With the high number of Native Americans living on reservations and getting Federal 'assistance', they've become trapped in a world of poverty like no other demographic group.  That certainly skews the number.  So, whereas 34% is an impressive number, it doesn't seem based in reality - in fact, double what the Census reports.Also, since most reservations are not exactly in 'Metro' areas, I could see that skewing the PCIG number dramatically.

 

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @morrainepeak The vast wealth that migrates to Santa Fe, Taos, and a few resorts is extreme versus the long heritage of natives and others there.  The state isn't blessed with much rain water, so farmers aren't, on average that blessed either.  Compared to Mississippi, they have much more to answer for.  There aren't vast numbers of wealthy moving to Jackson, and the farmers are blessed with lots of rain and fertile soil.

johnhspivey
johnhspivey

 @Myrna.Minkoff-Katz Exactly.  You're catching on.  The Federal Government does - and always have mistreated Native Americans.   

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @Myrna.Minkoff-Katz the state mistreats natives?  The federal gov't does.  The state seems to celebrate it's natives unlike any other state in the union.

morrainepeak
morrainepeak

At that time the entire national economy was improving and NM had a relativlely anemic period of vicarious  economic improvement.  Johnson was correct :"he wasn't responsible for any of it".

jerikjonsson
jerikjonsson

 @morrainepeak Between '95 and '03?  Not a bad time at all to be a New Mexican.  GSP up during that period, and as Gov. Johnson says, he wasn't responsible for any of it.  He just kept state government from screwing it up.  Poverty has increased since '90?  Source?

nacnudnod
nacnudnod

 @scottindallas While I do support legalization of drugs, that is not what I am talking about.  Even if no drugs are legalized, drug dealers buy stuff.  And when they buy stuff they will pay a tax.  Now they sell drugs and never pay federal tax on that money ever.  With the fair tax every time they make a purchase of legal goods they will pay a tax. 

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @nacnudnod by whom?  A fair tax doesn't legalize those things, legalization does.  Do you think a fair tax is gonna encourage your pot dealer to run and register with the Comptroller?  Only reported transactions are taxed, the black market won't suddenly report for the privilege of paying taxes.  

 

Again, I do think legalizing prohibited sectors might achieve what you report, but the form of taxation doesn't change that.  We'd more easily detect and collect income taxes from those people too, and presumably property taxes, as they are able to open up a storefront.  You've conflated two different issues. 

nacnudnod
nacnudnod

 @scottindallas How does the underground economy get taxed under the fair tax?  Criminals buy stuff.  The stuff they buy would be taxed.  

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @jctevere how does the underground economy get taxed under a fair tax???  Your reading comprehension is bad, I said I assailed an accountant who supported this fool notion.   I never said anything about drug legalization--I'm against as much prohibition as we can get, prostitution, drugs, abortion, guns.  Once the federal gov't exempts things, you're recreating the bureaucracy you were trying to avoid.  The only way to do a gross receipts tax would be to allow the states to enforce, using their own rules.  But, again, those who live on a fraction of their income are not taxed but on that fraction.  Again, we'd have the same inequality, and risk driving more economic activity underground. 

scottindallas
scottindallas topcommenter

 @nacnudnod An income tax is more fair as it taxes net profits.  Sales taxes are receipts taxes, which hits capital intensive firms (the only productive firms and the only ones who hire lots of others) hardest while favoring capital lite firms like Finance, professions, lobbyists, and the corporate execs.  Further, small firms are hit hard, as are entrepreneurs. 

 

Whereas income taxes are low if you have a bad year, and higher if you're doing well (and can afford them)  They are levied on net profits, which favors capital intensive production (meaning they have lots of costs in their production, unlike cap lite producers)  Low income tax rates also are bad in the same way.  The greater the spread between nominal and effective tax rates, the greater the incentive to capital intensive production.

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