Boy Scouts Stand Firm on Gay Ban, Spokesman Tells Ousted Pack Leader Jennifer Tyrrell

Categories: Lost Causes

JenniferTyrellAndSon.jpg
Jennifer Tyrrell with 7-year-old son Cruz.
Boy Scouts of America has made it abundantly clear: While they have no problem with gay people per se, they do have a problem with gays being associated with the organization. That's why Irving-based BSA ousted Ohio mom Jennifer Tyrrell as leader of her son's Cub Scout Pack.

A couple of months back, the BSA quashed scurrilous rumors that it was so much as considering changing its gay ban, and, in case it wasn't clear the first thousand times, it reminded us again on Tuesday.

Nevertheless, Tyrrell followed through on her plan to show up at BSA's Walnut Hill headquarters this morning to hand-deliver a petition to the organization's leadership.

Talking with the media after a 12-minute meeting with BSA spokesman Deron Smith, Tyrrell said the meeting was respectful but "no promises were made," the Morning News reports. In short, BSA did what we expected them to do: They told Tyrrell she can't serve as her son's pack leader and that their policy's not changing.


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9 comments
dwind
dwind

This mother can be an actively involved parent, go to any campouts (though in cub scouts it's much fewer), and support her son in many ways. The BSA only has a position on Openly homosexual individuals holding leadership positions. In my experience in Boy Scouts and in Cub Scouts, about 10 boys to a den, and anywhere from 2 to 10 dens, with one or two parent leaders per den. My mother was my den leader, but I saw my friend's mother as much as my own during cub scout events, and she wasn't a leader. Any sort of sexuality is an off-limits topic in scouts, and other than teaching about the dangers of sexual predators, its not talked about. If this mother's pack has a problem with her being an involved parent, then she needs to find a different group of individuals to be around for the sake of herself and her son. Personally I've never seen any discrimination or hate of any kind based on orientation, race, hair color, religion, or disability. My troop had middle eastern, jewish, hindu, christian, ginger, and mentally handicapped boys... and I'm sure a few were gay too. Maybe my troop was more progressive or outside the norm, but I know lots of scouts from all over that talk about an inclusive environment for boys to develop leadership and outdoor skills. The only thing in scouts that talks about families is the 'Family Life' required merit badge, and it talks about how in today's world there are many types of families, and that we must respect and be open to others. you learn to talk with your family and grow as a person. I'd say its less than 1% of the Boy Scout program, and it's as inclusive as it gets. The National stance at the company level may dislike the idea that people don't choose to be gay, but it certainly doesn't tell its members that gays are bad. 

Storm_71
Storm_71

So I take it you won't be voting for Obama?

Ket
Ket

That's great be sure to get bumper stickers so we know how to spot you. I just wish the BSA wasn't on your list of anti-gay organizations. It is not a part of its mission statement and really shouldn't be a topic that comes up at all.

L
L

Congrats to BSA! Where does it say one has to support or accept the gay lifestyle. My sons will be Boy Scouts and I will continue to eat at Chick-fil-A! As well as support any anti-gay organizations!

Montemalone
Montemalone

 Homosexuality is not a view or a lifestyle, any more than red hair is a view or blue eyes a lifestyle. Your couching your bigotry in some misguided freedom of choice argument. The best thing that could happen to your son is for him to meet and be around people different from himself. Gays and lesbians aren't contagious. Your son won't suddenly decide to kiss boys just because he knows a gay man. The only thing that will cause him to want to kiss boys is his own sexuality, which a caring parent will accept without scorn or disdain.

Jason
Jason

Possibly true - and since the position of the BSA, a private organization, not to promote homosexual lifestyles, it should come as no surprise that they would not permit her to be a troop leader.

Poppacraig
Poppacraig

He does know why that policy is wrong. And I have yet to find another organization that could replace all the wonderful things I learned and experienced in scouts. Am sorry that your own cub scouting experience was not up to par, but cub scouts are really only a preparatory level. I also think it is dishonest to classify the organization as hateful. While a scout I logged hundreds of community service hours and projects. From rebuilding homes and churches, to conservation projects, to gathering supplies for and working in soup kitchens. Just a few months ago my son and his pack collected several pick up trucks full of food for charity. They have one policy that is backwards and exclusionary. I be,I've, and I teach my son to believe that III is better to work within an try to enact a change rather than sit outside and name call.

Ket
Ket

I also had several good leaders in scouting that were likely gay and like you I learned a lot from them. And your final line is the crux of the matter: you and I are Eagles, we still have a connection to this organization and a right to demand more from it. Based on your age, most, if not all, of you time in scouting this rule did not exist. It seems ot me that todays scouts should have the same vibrant scouting experience we had, not some reduced version hobbled by the bigotry of the most vocal. Be an Eagle that demands more from the BSA.

Ket
Ket

What do you base your assumptions on that she was teaching members about the gay lifestyle? Since sex itself is a rather taboo subject in scouting (typically met with "that's something you will want to talk to your parents about") I find it very hard to believe she ever mentioned her homosexual lifestyle to her troop.

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