Libtard Alert: New Republic Says DISD Salaries Underscore the Importance of Unions

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Is Mike Miles $300,000 salary too much? The New Republic thinks it is. There's a surprise.
So it's been easy to get bogged down in the last few days with questions like "Holy shit! Jennifer Sprague is making how much?" and "Wait, you think us media types are blowing this salary thing out of proportion because Jennifer Sprague is young and blond and has boobs?"

But, remember, there are new hires pulling down decent coin at DISD. Like chief of staff Alan King, who will make $225,000, operations chief Kevin Smelker who will make $220,000, and let's not forget Miles himself, who will take home as much as $350K. All this while the average teacher in DISD makes $56,000 per year.

Which is why Timothy Noah, writing in the New Republic, makes DISD a poster child for the importance of public employee unions. They help keep things in balance.

Being a teacher is back-breakingly difficult work. It is also extremely important work. Being the press agent or innovation chief for the school superintendent is, by comparison, fairly easy, and I wouldn't be surprised to learn that the hours are much shorter. It's also fairly trivial. Being superintendent or the superintendent's chief of staff is important work, but there's no chance it's as difficult as being a teacher, and I hesitate to say that it's as important. The boss always makes more, and I guess we can't begrudge him that. But for the boss to make more than six times more than the average teacher is freaking outrageous.

But this is the New Republic. If Noah were going to bemoan the power of unions and argue that salaries and benefits should be left to the market, he'd be writing in the National Review. But setting aside for a minute Sprague's salary, which is just silly, is it really unreasonable to pay the superintendent $300,000 per year? That's a lot of money but, whatever Noah may claim, steering a large school district is a job that an exceedingly small percentage of the population is cut out to do. I'm not going to begrudge Miles his $300,000, at least until he steers into a larger iceberg than Sprague.

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8 comments
Guest
Guest

King has been a disaster. Most of the good work done by the former CFO has been undone. A prime example is the E-rate funding that was close to being allocated but is still not in place. His hiring and firing record as supt. was atrocious as he broke every law and policy on the books. Then there is the Title I investigation that would have been avoided had he known anything about federal funding.

teacher
teacher

I like the idea of performance pay and charter schools.  I believe the idea of having choices makes you work harder/smarter.  I don't make as much money as I did in the corporate world but the peace of mind, love/respect of my students, challenge to make students believe in themselves......and actually do it!  These are things money can't buy. Again, nobody is making anybody teach.....I encourage you to go do something else, perhaps you would understand that there is no utopia and stop whining.  I've been teaching for 24 years - mostly at the high school level for those of you who doubt I am a teacher.  It's funny that "some" people on this blog believe that if you don't agree with them and their entitlement attitude then you shouldn't be teaching.  well, maybe it's not funny - actually it's dangerous. 

Jared Heath
Jared Heath

wow should be banned by IP from ever posting here again.

Guest
Guest

This is incredibly deceptive.  No one, teacher or otherwise, can collect his own benefit AND a spousal benefit under social security.  For most couples in the private sector, that means if both spouses worked, neither will ever be eligible for a spousal benefit from social security because they both will have paid in.  For a long time teachers worked the system to "double dip" by claiming they were eligible for survivor benefits from their husbands' SS AND their own pension.  The law was changed to treat teachers like everyone else, closing the loophole.  It probably would be simpler for everyone if we just made teachers (and all other government employees) pay into social security and gave them the same benefits as everyone else.  But I doubt many teachers groups would support such a change because teachers are better off not paying into SS and not receiving any SS benefits. 

Storm_71
Storm_71

You really have no clue do you fuckstick? By the way I'm not a teacher so I can use whatever "low life foul mouth" language I choose.

Storm_71
Storm_71

I tip my Red Ranger cap to you sir or ma'am for the selfless work you do. Keep fighting the good fight. 

Qwe
Qwe

There are way too many lawyers. However, at least employed lawyers put in the hours. My lawyer friends are always working late nights and weekends, hustling for business, and attending work-related functions. My teacher friends are always very well caught up on True Blood, Vampire Diaries, and 50 Shades of Gray.

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