Ladies, Start Your Mammary Glands: Dallas is Sponsoring a Synchronized Breastfeeding Event

Breastfeeding.jpg
Wikipedia
The Big Latch On circa 1500, as captured by Albrecht Durer.
Back in December, the city of Dallas opened its Community Baby Cafe, which provides resources not for eating young children, as the easily confused might be led to believe, but for nursing them. Research has made the benefits of breastfeeding increasingly undeniable, so the city decided to launch CBC as a free resource to educate new and expectant mothers on the hows and whys of nursing, and to provide a comfortable place to do so.

It's been wildly successful, says Mary Jo Williams, a lactation consultant at CBC.

"It's like going to Starbucks or Panera Bread, and you're sitting with the girls, drinking a cup of coffee," she says.

Like that, except better for your child. Nutritional considerations aside, did you know that store-bought baby formula sometimes contains bug parts? Yep. That's why Williams refers to it as "beetle juice."

This August, the city will wade a bit further into breastfeeding advocacy when the CBC sponsors its first Big Latch On.

According to the press release (the most surprising I've received from City Hall), the "synchronized breastfeeding event in multiple locations," which was launched in New Zealand in 2005 and migrated to Portland, Oregon (of course) in 2010, will take place at 10:30 a.m. on Aug. 4 at the CBC, scenically located at 8202 Spring Valley Road, just behind O'Reilly Auto Parts.

Mothers are encouraged to arrive 10 minutes early, find a comfortable spot, and prepare for the signal. On the half hour, babies are to latch on for a full minute while cafe staff count nursing mothers for the official Big Latch On worldwide tally.

Dads are welcome. There's a lounge dedicated to men, free Wi-Fi, and lots of breasts belonging to sleep-deprived, probably short-fused moms. On second thought, the yard will probably need mowing.

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11 comments
Derek Hil
Derek Hil

I found your website perfect for my needs. It contains wonderful and helpful posts. I have read most of them and learned a lot from them. You are doing some great work. Thank you for making such a nice website.  www.newbreastfeeding.com

KMD
KMD

I never said dangerous, but whatever. I guess Similac is lying about their product and the FDA and CDC are full of shit (well, that may be right). Believe what you want, regardless of the facts.

Storm_71
Storm_71

Umm, KMD.  It hasn't been that long since we fed our baby both kinds of formula..ready to eat (premade) and the powdered formula.  He was not a premie, but I would never have fed my child something that was dangerous.  You can either use boiling water in the powder or you can use a commercial steamer to heat the water in the bottle. Either, way Scott is correct.  POW. 

KMD
KMD

I think we are talking about the same thing...powdered infant formula, including Neosure. I have no idea why a hospital would be ignoring FDA,CDC, and the formula companies' own instructions about not feeding powdered formula to preemies. My guess is that it's cheaper and easier, which is really the bottom line in health care these days. Also makes you question formula companies' marketing when they are making a product designed for a specific subset of babies, then writing on the label that it shouldn't be given to that subset of babies.

KMD
KMD

Or if you prefer, from the SIMILAC website: "Powdered infant formulas are not sterile and should not be fed to premature infants or infants who might have immune problems, unless directed and supervised by your baby's doctor." Or the FDA: "The FDA has become increasingly aware that a substantial percentage of premature neonates in neonatal intensive care units are being fed non-commercially sterile dry infant formula. In light of the epidemiological findings and the fact that powdered infant formulas are not commercially sterile products, FDA recommends that powdered infant formulas not be used in neonatal intensive care settings unless there is no alternative available."

KMD
KMD

Powdered formula is NOT sterile. "Baby formula is available in three forms: ready-to-feed, concentrated liquid and powder. Ready-to-feed is used "as is." Concentrated liquid (the only liquid that comes in a 13 ounce can) and powder must be diluted with water according to instructions on the label. Ready-to-feed and concentrated liquid baby formulas are commercially sterile. Powdered formulas are not sterile. Preparation of any form of infant formula (especially powdered products) requires careful handling to prevent contamination and minimize growth of microorganisms. Manufacturer's instructions should be followed in all cases."

KMD
KMD

Actually, hospitals use premade, not powdered, formula, for newborns and preemies.  Premade formula is sterile.  Powdered formula is not. Fact.

Lalala
Lalala

Not sleep deprived. Latch the kid on and go back to sleep. Mother nature never intended for us to be zombies. She intended for us to breastfeed and cosleep. If you want to be a zombie then do it properly: take some bath salts.

mmm, bugs
mmm, bugs

 Breast milk fresh off the tap is probably the only thing humans eat that doesn't contain bug parts.

Chichi
Chichi

I am so there! I love this post :)

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