Doctor Accused of $375 Million Medicare Fraud Decides He Won't Practice Medicine Anymore

Categories: Crime, Healthcare

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Jacques Roy
You might remember Dr. Jacques Roy. Back in February, the feds fingered him as the leader of one of the largest Medicare fraud schemes in history, alleging that he bilked the federal government of nearly $375 million.

To recap: Between 2005 and 2011, Roy referred more than 11,000 individual patients for home health services, which was more than any other medical practice in the United States. The crack team at the Department of Health and Human Services, "using sophisticated data analysis," determined that since this was 500 times the rate of referral of the average physician, something was fishy.

So it was. According to the indictment, Roy used home health agencies to recruit patients. Roy's company, Medistat, would then bill Medicare for home visits and medical services that were either unnecessary or never happened. One of his associates allegedly trolled for patients at The Bridge.

All of which is a roundabout way of letting you know that you can now just call him Mr. Roy. The Texas Medical Board announced Friday (though it only appeared in my inbox today) that Roy permanently surrendered his medical license "in lieu of further disciplinary proceedings regarding allegations he failed to meet the standard of care for two patients and violation of state and federal law."

It's just as well, since the license won't of much use at Seagoville's Federal Correctional Institution, where Roy awaits a November cro,oma; trial.


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5 comments
Max from the Sandspit
Max from the Sandspit

Hate to point this out but this is common parctice for lawyers, trollin' for turds.

tmickle
tmickle

And the government wants to take over healthcare and they can even run the Post Office!

Sotiredofitall
Sotiredofitall

Thank you for helping point out the important issue of governmental incompetence in being able to monitor their programs.  At least it's good to see his medical license was yanked, which also seems to seldom happen in cases like this.

Paul
Paul

"The crack team at the Department of Health and Human Services, "using sophisticated data analysis," determined that since this was 500 times the rate of referral of the average physician, something was fishy." And they had to wait to gather 6 years of data and study it for over a year before they reached their conclusion. The moral of this story is that if you are going to run a scam like this, don't be greedy, ... shut it down after 5 years instead of 6 and be happy with about $300 million. Any auditor, including one that worked for Enron, should have been able to see that this guy was an outlier 6 months after he started his scam. With this extent of a large scale corrupt organization being possible, it does make me wonder how much is fraudulently billed at a much lower scale.  Instead of the whole enterprise being corrupt and fraudulent, how about 5% of a legitimate organization's business?

Coleman
Coleman

 when's the last time you mailed a letter, hoss?

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