DeVry is Quite Surprised by the Negative Reaction to its Plan to Train Caribbean Med Students in Texas

BruceKaplan.jpg
Back before I posted this piece about how DeVry -- yes, that DeVry -- wanted to train students from one of its Caribbean medical schools in Texas hospitals, I reached out to the for-profit university for a more detailed explanation of their plans and, perhaps, a comment. None came. But over the weekend, the PR folks at DeVry dropped me an email to me to see if I had time to schedule an interview with Dr. Bruce Kaplan, executive dean and chief academic officer of the American University of the Caribbean.

When I spoke with him yesterday, Kaplan said he was surprised by the pushback from lawmakers and medical school officials who fear that AUC's presence in Texas might edge students at Texas medical schools out of scarce clerkships in teaching hospitals.

AUC had been quietly pursuing the proposal for more than a year. The school already places about 90 percent of its students in clerkships at U.S. hospitals (the rest go to the U.K.), but Kaplan said that some of AUC's Texas-born students wanted to finish out their medical training closer to home.

Texas is one of a handful of states, including California, New York and New Jersey, that regulates the relationships between medical schools and teaching hospitals. In most other states, Kaplan said, individual hospitals decide what medical school to partner with.

So AUC approached the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board with a modest proposal: Grant AUC a two-year permit to place 20 Texas-born students in clerkships within the state.

Kaplan said the low number and short time period would allow the THECB and other medical schools to decide whether opening Texas' doors to AUC students would pose a problem. AUC also worked with THECB, to convene an independent panel of medical education experts that visited the Saint Maarten campus to evaluate the quality of the school. The panel, Kaplan said, issued a sterling report.

The idea was to be open about AUC's intentions and provide a test run so that the "turf battles, political battles, non-objective comments would be weeded out," Kaplan said.

Things didn't exactly happen that way, so AUC is now in a holding pattern while THECB waits for an opinion from Attorney General Greg Abbott on whether granting a permit to a foreign medical school is legal.

AUC thinks it is.

"We believe the coordinating board does have authority to do this," Kaplan said. "We're hoping that by presenting objective information," the proposal will be approved. "If they don't, we look at any and all remedies that may be available."

My Voice Nation Help
20 comments
Jharris006
Jharris006

There are a little over 800,000 doctors for 320,000,000 Americans. How in the world is that not a shortage?

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

All it takes is a cursory look at what you wrote to see why you will never be a real doctor, just a Caribbean trained Pseudodoctor. 

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

I didn't know Texans had so much money to spend on Foreign trained students. Hope your taxes don't go up. 

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

Caribbean trained students are definitely subpar in their training, USMLE notwithstanding. 

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

Their statistics the schools put out are definitely not trustworthy. It is unfortunate that people repeat these statistics ad nauseum to somehow create an equality between a Caribbean medical student and a real one. 

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

Really? You are going to accuse others of not knowing what they are talking about, then say something as absurd as 95% of US born students match after training in the Caribbean? Maybe don't believe everything you read in the brochure and do some ACTUAL research. 

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

100% Agree. They are foreign med students, even if they are not foreign in birth. 

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

He really is subverting it. When you train 1000 student medical classes of people who got 21's on their MCAT (Yes, the American averages on MCATS are far lower than what these schools post on their websites), then come to Texas for training not only subverts Medicine in this country, it severely harms patients in the process. 

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

Sounds like typical bullying tactics. "Accept our subpar students over your own best interests or we will sue!" Wonder how Texans feel about spending money training these Pseudodoctors. 

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

NY medical schools are having a VERY hard time placing actually trained medical students because of the influx of Caribbean students. It is not hard to find sources on this, learn to use google. 

Saleem Sully Azad
Saleem Sully Azad

You are absolutely right. Opening the doors to an influx of Caribbean trained Pseudodoctors will undermine the health care system of Texas as a whole. Why isn't the Texas legislature moving on this to protect the well being of Texans, by banning Caribbean graduates altogether?

Jamie
Jamie

 First of all your statement is not true.  Many of these doctors are Americans first of all. Secondly US med schools are not having a problem training their students. Lastly, if the US is concerned about the shortage of doctors here and have decided upon opening more and more medical schools here in the U.S. why not mandate them to open teaching hospitals to train these students post graduation instead of not increasing the number or residency spots? Their solution to the problem is only making it bigger.  Congress needs to get their priorties in check instead of cutting funding to teaching hospitals willing to train these medical graduates. What's the purpose of having a huge piece of paper that shows one of your life's biggest accomplishment if its worthless in the end?

Jamie
Jamie

 The sad part is you dont even realize that the chances are you have already been seen by one. Those same people you claim are "crappy doctors" are the ones treating you or someone you know. Glad to see you're willing to dismiss the same person who has no choice of dismissing you as a patient but is willing to treat you and possibly save your life if that moment were to arise. These are healthcare workers not some business associate. No one is try pull a fast one on you. And don't you think there's a series of exams that U.S. creates to filter out those "crappy doctors" from "sketch schools"? Try to make use of your brain by  feeding it with intelligence instead of stupidity and ignorance. Put your self in someone elses shoe before you ever decide to cast an opinion about them.

Jamie
Jamie

Why do people post things with out any truth to what they are saying?! Seriously?! You show your true colors when you post something that's utterly untrue and ridiculous. Get your facts straight WR. First of ALL, the US has always had a problem with the shortage of doctors in this country. That's why there is a mandate that was created that said an X amount of medschools were to open in the US by 2015 or something so there are going to plenty of schools here for students to apply to and learn from. But that does not change the fact that US med schools are known to be quite expensive to attend. So even if you were able to get in you might not necessarily be able to afford to go there that's many see the Caribbean as the alternate choice. You would never know honestly speaking if the doctor you were seeing in the hospital was a graduate here or from the the caribbean. Also if you did any research at all you would know and understand how the process goes of getting a residency in the U.S. Something around 95% of the U.S. graduates MATCH into a residency spot here in the U.S. while around 50% of IMG (International Medical Graduates: Those include US-IMG which are U.S. born STUDENTS who attended a foreign medical school) match. So as you can see there is a clear bias towards U.S. Med students of getting residency over someone as competent if not more who is a foreign medical graduate. Frankly there is a lot that goes into the selection process but there is a clear bias towards IMG's which is unfortunate. Sometimes it comes down to cutting cost because if you are not a US-IMG and just an IMG the hospital program would have to sponsor you to work here which costs them money.  Lastly, you can not for the most part start rotations from these caribbean schools unless you have passed the USMLE Step 1 licensing exam. This is the same exam that all U.S. practicing doctors and medical students take. So if you are clearly able to pass that exam and score well you are at the same playing field as someone who was educated in the U.S.  Don't knock down those who did everything in their power to attempt at future they wanted for themselves. And please think before you write something or even say something without having a knowledge or facts to back up what you are saying.  

Anon
Anon

I'm sure they'd gladly open a location in the US if the supply of medical school educations wasn't so tightly controlled, making entry near impossible. 

Anon
Anon

you mean the American Medical Education cartel?

Drtobe
Drtobe

I am a U.S. citizen and attend a foreign medical school.  I received my bachelor's degree from a University in California; completed all of the same pre-medical requirements as the rest.   We have to pass the U.S. medical licensing exam; ALL OF THEM, just like the students attending an American medical school. How are we less prepared than a student who studied in the U.S.? The USMLE does not lie and All medical students and medical residencies know this.  I have had hands on clinical experience from day one of medical school. Many American educated students have to wait until 3rd year clinical rotations to do that. I have learned medicine in two different languages.  I will be able to communicate with a growing population of patients in the U.S. that do not speak English as their first language.  Either way... you my fellow Americans, can argue all you want; I will wear the same white coat in a few years and treat every patient that walks through my door equally, even though you guys like to hold prejudices against Your Own.  A life is a life and if I can save it or improve a patients quality of life, I will regardless of their discrimination (with consent of course).          

WR
WR

I don't care if they are Martians. They are students from a sketchy school in the Caribbean wanting to steal hospital slots assigned to Texas schools. UNACCEPTABLE!

Houston
Houston

I sure would like to get an MD degree by spending years on a nice warm beach. I'm so totally against giving a Caribbean medical school any kind of license to operate on Texas soil and produce crappy doctors. And don't use the so-called physician shortage as an excuse for this foot-in-the-door scam. I don't care where the Caribbean students were born.

Now Trending

Dallas Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

General

Loading...