LINC'd In, Or: Next Up, Trying to Really Connect Downtown Dallas with the Trinity River

LINC.jpg
The five areas LINC will focus on, per the hint provided in today's Trinity River Corridor Project Commitee's PowerPoint on economic development
If you've got time this afternoon you may want to dial up the meeting of the Trinity River Corridor Project Committee, which will hear from Dallas CityDesign Studio second-in-command David Whitley about "community and economic development" around the river. Not sure how much Whitley's going to get to talk about this: Most of the PowerPoint's about the West Dallas plan. But toward the end there are a few vague hints about what's coming as the city hopes to connect downtown and the river and "shape a new community along the old meanders and capitalize on current improvement efforts to create activity now."

I also see that Whitley's going before the City Plan Commission on Thursday to brief those folks about something called "LINC Dallas," which stands for "Leveraging and Improving Neighborhood Connections." Thursday's look-see promises big doings: a "briefing on the City's next large-scale urban design initiative." I called Brent Brown, head of the CityDesign Studio, to see if today's briefing and Thursday's talk are related. And, yes, they are.

The CityDesign Studio, he says, has just begun to look at five areas along the Trinity, on both sides of the levees, to see "how do you steward the dreams and interests of those areas and create something thoughtful and appropriate" among developments planned and possible. Those areas, says Brown, include Riverfront Boulevard, the Cedars, along the Lamar levee and the Tenth Street Bottoms and Cadillac Heights. (Now, perhaps, may be a good time to familiarize yourself with the 2005 Trinity River Corridor Comprehensive Land Use Plan.)

"There are plans and public investment," says Brown, "but how do you galvanize those areas and articulate with greater clarity the opportunity there as well as the type of connections that can be beneficial? This is like the work we did in West Dallas; that's what it was about. We just hadn't named it. So we sat down and said, 'How do we communicate what we're trying to do? And at the same time we're working with Economic Development and Housing and engaging the public in urban design and planning. The question became: What's the next area? So we took a look around the Trinity and asked: How do you get from downtown to the river? That's the question everybody sees, but what's the answer?

"Yes, there are plans in place, but how do we talk about leveraging those connections? With LINC we're just beginning. For the last month we've been out meeting with folks, doing community engagement, briefing the council members in the areas affected. But this is the beginning of the beginning. We're trying to learn and understand what people have been doing and what they want to do."

Like he says, the beginning of the beginning. And it starts right about ... now.
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11 comments
catbird
catbird

UN Agenda 21 is being pushed forward here...watch out guys!

Craigley
Craigley

The CityDesign Studio sounds like y'all are hell bent on making a faux city.Very fitting.

Halldecker
Halldecker

 "but how do you galvanize those areas and articulate with greater clarity the opportunity there as well as the type of connections that can be beneficial?"-------

Watch out,  anybody who says something this idiotic is about to piss on your leg.

LDR4
LDR4

I don't think that anyone involved in the Trinity River Project has ever seen the river cresting.

Larry
Larry

The elephant in the room is the State and Dallas County jails located on both sides of Commerce, and the littering of bail bond places that support it. If Dallas were a grittier town then we could engage in a discussion about mitigating the presence of the jails. But this is Dallas. It has to be sanitized, i.e., both jails have to be moved. That's the biggest real impediment to "connecting downtown to the Trinity," along with the mixmaster and I-35. If the city wants to really talk about a game changer, forget toll roads in the flood plain and figure out with the State and County how to move the damn jails.

Darrd2010
Darrd2010

looking at the Trinity River Corridor Study is interesting in how it coincides with what we will reveal on the 21st about natural gas pad site locations in Dallas that in which no one knows.Buckle your seatbelts.

DuckDuckGoose
DuckDuckGoose

" ...  on both sides of the levees ..."  Also Known As "might flood and will flood" 

tony
tony

Step 1: No major road (medium/high speed limit, few crosswalks, fence between sidewalk and park) between first row of development and the river. Drive up Turtle Creek/Cedar Springs and you'll see how placing a road in between the first row of buildings and the park-river area completely separates the two. Obviously a different scenario, as Turtle Creek has a different elevation, but more could have been done to merge the two.

Gangy
Gangy

I know what you mean, Halldecker.  He sounds like he's from another planet or that he really has nothing to say and just put together some "inspiring" words for the occasion. 

Ellum08
Ellum08

I know, what was George Kessler thinking?

Seriously though, I thought Turtle Creek was what the Trinity Parkway was originally supposed to emulate. Do walker/joggers have to pay attention to cross Turtle Creek? Yes. But it isn't really all that hard to do. Could more be done to make it safer? Absolutely. 

However, I still think it is one of the more beautiful drives in Dallas.  

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