Gas Drilling Activists Send Council's Task Force a Letter and Their Top Five "Proposed Rules"

GasDrilling_pressconf_Crawford.jpg
Photo by Patrick Michels
Back in April, Raymond Crawford and other local environmentalists brought to City Hall the 21-foot-long petition that helped spark the formation of the Gas Drilling Task Force.
When first formed back in June, the city council-appointed Gas Drilling Task Force had hoped to turn into council by November its list of recommendations for an ordinance regulating drilling in the city limits. Time, after all, is of the essence as companies who paid the city millions for leases wait to see whether the city will allow them to drill, baby, drill -- or not, and run the risk of being sued. But the task force has been off for a couple of weeks and isn't set to return to City Hall till February 21; council shouldn't expect recommendations till March, after which they can decide to start all over again if they don't dig what they see. So this is far from over.

That said, the gas-drilling activists' unofficial task force, to which we were introduced in Octoberthat includes reps Dallas Area Residents for Responsible Drilling, Downwinders at Risk and the Dallas Sierra Club, has dispatched to the task force its own list of recommendations consisting of their top five most important concerns. Among them: "Minimum 3,000 foot setback to protect Dallas homeowners and residents where they live, work, worship and play" -- this, after XTO and Trinity East's reps told the task force that 1,000-foot setback were too big and a "deal-killer." The group also wants to "disallow exporting water for drilling operations outside Dallas, and charge gas companies more for the hundreds of millions of gallons of water they permanently contaminate."

Each point it fleshed out at great length in the missive sent to the task force, which begins:
From our perspective you've gotten many things right in living up to your charge and Mayor Rawling's vow never to put any neighborhood at risk because of money. But we also know that the chronicling of hazards associated with fracking of natural gas is a moving target and new information can make rules that have not even been codified yet obsolete overnight.
As always both docs are below. Dallas Gas Drilling Task Force Letter 5 Points for the Task Force-2FINAL

Sponsor Content

My Voice Nation Help
7 comments
Steve T
Steve T

The shale (tight) gas phenomenon is the result of continued demand, the desire to use less coal, improved technology (horizontal drilling and/or fracking), and an enormous PR campaign—and an intense desire for the public to believe in continued cheap fossil fuels and even “energy independence” by the US.  The PR campaign involves hype and several myths designed to lure investors and repel government restrictions (“It’s a simple, safe process”; “The wells will produce for many decades”, etc.).  The result is a mass delusion, except when producers want to drill in expensive neighborhoods (mostly Republican-leaning) where the “not in my backyard” syndrome quickly arises (like those in the towns of Southlake and Flower Mound in north central Texas).  The process is, in fact, far from simple and safe, and these plays tend to decline sharply after a just a few years.Another problem is natural gas prices are still low because of this rush in which thousands of wells have been drilled in the last few years. But it is also due to the continued relative cheapness of coal (because we refuse to consider all the costs of using it and believe that there can actually be “clean coal”); therefore, most shale gas producers are not making a profit on their wells, as the techniques mentioned above are more expensive than conventional vertical drilling; plus, the leases tend to be more expensive, as many of the shale plays are in urban areas.“100 years of natural gas”—those who use that phrase don’t even distinguish between the probable, the possible, and the speculative, much less consider all the factors above. We’ve seen it all before in the gold rushes of the 19th century.  It’s a bubble that will burst, and natural gas prices will rise.

Darrd2010
Darrd2010

Here's hoping that the City of Dallas takes our recommendations seriously and does not only listen to lobbyist Dallas Cothrum. As we drive all over Dallas from North to South to the Central corridor looking at what land has been given away to the industry, it makes me sad to see the possible effects it could have on EVERYONE in Dallas. Time will tell if at the end of this journey the City of Dallas does what Mayor Mike promised in 'protecting citizens' over industry, or if they choose to instead put Dallas citizens at risk.

Oak Cliff Townie
Oak Cliff Townie

 Wrap that Petition  around a couple  of Hundred dollar bill bricks and it might do some good ..

Timothy R. Ruggiero
Timothy R. Ruggiero

The promise of 'jobs' and 'millions in tax revenue' is just that- a promise, and a promise that is frequently broken because of issues that arise that even Industry allots for. Natural gas wells do not produce for any length of time, the average life span being 5-7 years. When the wells dry up, the jobs move away and the mailbox is empty. The environmental and health damage is certain and forever, as is the millions upon millions of gallons water we simply don't have to give. 

Many communities are on strict water usage, but Industry has free license to permanently poison billions of gallons, which creates an entirely other set of problems-what to do with this poison water. It may very well have salt in it, but it's not salt water, it's extremely lethal. Billions of gallons of water wasted, injected with hundreds of thousands of gallons of carcinogens add up to one giant spreading toxic wasteland.

 Injection wells may put these billions of gallons of poisoned water well underground, but in doing so causes earthquakes, foundation issues and risk aquifer contamination. It is irresponsible for the Ed Ireland's and Elizabeth Ames Jones of Texas to dismiss aquifer contamination by way of depth and geology.

 I have moved my family well out of Gasland, and there is no production in Pilot Point-but, for some reason that Ed Ireland has yet to explain, we have levels of frack fluids in our drinking water. I'm sure the Industry cheerleaders like Ireland will explain it as 'surface spills, faulty equipment...but definitely NOT hydraulic fracturing." Even if this could be proven true (which is most definitely has not) contaminated water is contaminated water, regardless of the method. Pointing fingers at golf courses and other industry doesn't change one cold hard fact that gas well drilling is a damned dirty business.

claytonauger
claytonauger

Very nice. These seem reasonable. Thanks for posting these docs. 

Jasminesmith198714
Jasminesmith198714

★★★★★ Looking to bring more passion to your life? Welcome to---onenightcupid.c/0/m---, the world's largest community for no strings attached encounters. Regardless of your status, you'll find the discreet relationship or special 'one night' that you desire. Come in and discover the excitement you deserve! ^_^

Marianagriggs
Marianagriggs

Mr., Ms, or Mrs. Auger?These are sensible and strong recommendations. Now people NEED to bring them to the attention of the City Council. Please write, call, email, or sign up to speak to the council to help them keep their eyes on the prize, the health and safety of Dallas citizens.Thanks for commenting.MG

Now Trending

Dallas Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

General

Loading...