Before Vote to Help Uplift Sell Less Expensive Bonds, City Council to Get Schooled on Charters

DISDvChartersBriefing.JPG
A chart contained in the briefing on charter schools prepared for the city council in advance of Wednesday's get-together
Below is the charter school briefing the city council was promised last week, but only after the heated discussion punctuated by Mayor Mike Rawlings's fiery call to expand charters -- because, as he said, "freedom is choice, choice creates excellence, and excellence graduates kids." The purpose of the briefing, of course, is twofold: to explain charters to council members who've had little experience with them, and to calm the nerves of those 'round the horseshoe concerned about forming that corporation that would help Uplift Education sell those tax-exempt bonds for its expansion into Deep Ellum and Fort Worth. Some of the council just want to know if the city's on the hook for the bonds; others are concerned their aiding and abetting the demise of the Dallas ISD.

The lengthy presentation -- one of many that will fill a busy Wednesday for the council, which will also hear that Southern Dallas growth plan -- reveals, among many other things, where Uplift gets its funding ("State sources 86%, Federal sources 10%, Private donations 4%"), its total attendance figures (5,700 students) and how many of them reside within the Dallas Independent School District (3,400). It also offers charts like the you see above. And so, what was once a hurry-up-and-vote consent addendum item is slowly, surely morphing into a much, much more significant conversation pitting the DISD against charters in general and Uplift in particular.

Which is nothing new.

Trustee Carla Ranger, for one, has long been terrified of the district's flirtation with charters, made very public in April 2010 when Tom Leppert and Michael Hinojosa held their City Hall presser to tout reform and rebirth in West Dallas and the possible creation of an Uplift-run teachers' academy, for which there's no money, not yet. Said the trustee last year, when several Uplift board members were appointed to the DISD's Citizens Budget Review Commission, "Persons connected to charter schools have a potential conflict in light of the current push to expand charter schools in Dallas ISD (Charter School Ad Hoc Committee)."

DISD has but one charter: Gabe P. Allen near Bernal and Singleton. But in September 2010, the district formed that ad hoc committee to look at upping that number, and so began those Dallas Regional Chamber-sponsored trips to Denver, Houston and Los Angeles to study their charters. But as The News noted in September 2010, "Some officials are also concerned DISD's best and brightest might be siphoned by charter schools, which could also hurt the traditional school system." Ranger, an acolyte of charter critic Diane Ravitch, wrote on her blog just last month, following the vote to close those 11 campuses: "The eventual sell-out of Dallas ISD real estate to charter schools is one likely result of what was just done by the Board on last Thursday night. Destroy public schools and privatize them with charter schools."

Ranger's reiterating what Ravitch has been saying for years, ever since the former deputy education secretary and No Child Left Behind proponent had her change of heart. The author of The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education said only last week that "what we're doing in this country is tearing apart public education and bringing in lots of entrepreneurial people to make money off education but we're not providing a better education. In fact I've concluded, and it's reconfirmed every day, we're making education worse."

Ravitch's name, of course, doesn't appear in the council briefing. But the 2009 RAND study of charters does, summed up with with a handful of random factoids pulled out of a massive 162-page report you can read in its entirety here. Or you can read the long-story-short, which does address some council members' concerns, specifically about whether "charter schools ... harm students in nearby traditional public schools by draining resources":
Charter schools are not skimming the highest-achieving students from traditional public schools, nor are they creating racial stratification. When researchers examined the prior achievement-test scores of students transferring to charter schools, they found that those scores were near or below the local district or state average. This suggests that charter schools are not drawing the best students away from traditional public schools, as some opponents predicted that they would. Similarly, when the researchers looked at whether transfers to charter schools affected the distribution of students by race or ethnicity, they found that, in most sites, the racial composition of the charter school entered by a transferring student was similar to that of the traditional public school that he or she had left.

On average, across varying communities and policy environments, charter middle and high schools produce achievement gains that are about the same as those in traditional public schools. However, the achievement gains for charter elementary schools are challenging to estimate and remain unclear because elementary students typically have no baseline test scores at the time they enter kindergarten. For middle- and high-school levels, the research team found that achievement gains in charter schools and traditional public schools were about the same, with two exceptions. First, charter schools generally do not perform well in the first year of operation, when their students tend to fall behind. Gains generally occur thereafter. Second, there is reason for concern about the performance of virtual charter schools, which serve their students remotely in the students' homes rather than in a school building. In the one location with a substantial number of virtual charter schools (Ohio), their students showed achievement gains that fell significantly short of those in traditional public schools and classroom-based charter schools.

Charter schools do not appear to help or harm student achievement in nearby traditional public schools. Some proponents have predicted that the presence of charter schools would have a positive effect on nearby traditional public schools by exerting positive competitive pressure; some opponents have worried that charter schools would harm students in nearby traditional public schools by draining resources. Neither theory was borne out by the study. The researchers examined student achievement in traditional public schools that had charter schools nearby, and they found that the presence of the charter schools did not appear to help or harm student achievement in the traditional public schools.

Students who attended charter high schools were more likely to graduate and go on to college. For the locations for which charter-high school graduation and college attendance rates were available -- Chicago and Florida -- the researchers found that attending a charter high school appeared to boost a student's probability of graduating by 7 to 15 percentage points. Similarly, students who attended a charter high school appeared to benefit from an 8 to 10 percentage point increase in the likelihood that they would enroll in college. Although there are some limitations to these results, they provide reason for encouragement in terms of the long-term benefits of charter schools. They also suggest a need to look beyond test scores to fully assess charter schools' performance.

Policy Implications

The study holds several implications for policy and future research. First, the finding that charter schools are not drawing the highest-achieving students from traditional public schools can help alleviate some of the concerns held by policymakers. Second, the absence of effects on achievement in nearby traditional public schools suggests that the loss of students to charter schools is not having negative achievement effects on traditional public schools, but it also suggests that charter schools may not produce the hoped-for positive competitive effects in traditional public schools. Finally, this research makes clear the need to move beyond test scores and broaden the scope of measures used to evaluate success. This was the first study to extend the scope of outcome measures to include long-term outcomes, such as high-school graduation and college attendance, in addition to test scores, and the results are more encouraging than test scores alone would indicate. Future research on charter schools should seek to examine a broader and deeper range of student outcomes.
Wait -- what's this vote on again? Oh, right -- helping Uplift sell less-expensive bonds to open a single school in Deep Ellum, and two more in Fort Worth. The briefing's below.CharterSchools_EFC_021512
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Mark Melton
Mark Melton

One other comment.  There's no need to look at this as charters vs. traditional school districts.  Improving public education is a complicated task, and there's no one "silver bullet."  Charters aren't the single answer any more than a single public ISD is the answer.  And this is a problem that will take the efforts of many.  Not all charters are successful, but Uplift has shown a pretty strong track record overall.  We need strong charters and we need a strong Dallas ISD.  There's no reason we can't support both organizations (and others) at the same time.  Choosing sides only hurts kids.  Lets work together to tackle this issue. 

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Charters operators pay themselves out of the funds that include tax dollars.

They have an incentive to cheap out on the kids so they have more left over for bigger operator/administrator salaries.

Robert
Robert

Stop claiming that Uplift administrators pay themselves large salaries at the expense of students. I know the CEO, Ms. Bhatia, by reputation...anyone that received her MBA from Stanford and then spent several years at my former firm, McKinsey, as a management consultant only took a substantial pay cut to lead that entity. Rather than applaud her decision to try and build a quality education school network in Dallas at meaningful personal cost, naysayers threatened by charters decide to make up claims about egregious salaries or real estate plays. Shame on you. Produce the link to your data or move on...it tarnishes the discussion.

Hometown Boy
Hometown Boy

Bill, she is the CEO. She hired a professional educator as her chief of schools. There are many, many aspects to running a school system that don't involve education...finance, management systems, real estate. Budgeting. Etc. Too often we put career educators in positions they are not trained for. Steve Jobs was not a computer engineer...he dropped out of college...but he put the right people with the right expertise in the right seats and built the most valuable company in the world.

Bbetzen
Bbetzen

It is frightening how we are now presuming someone with no professional background teaching can manage a school.  It is certain it can be done by unique individuals, but it is NOT normal.  In Finland every administrator is a teacher, and it is normal for principals to continue to teach a few classes.   You cannot loose touch with the classroom and do well as an administrator.  

That is part of the problem in DISD, administrators who have been outside the classroom, often for decades!  Too many decisions are being recommended by administration, and then approved by the DISD board, that reflect a lack of ongoing daily familiarity with the classroom.  DISD will begin to see progress when teachers are once again the masters of their own classrooms, with no micromanaging coming from the outside.  More people will then want to consider teaching as a profession. Schools can be more selective and demanding. If students are making progress leave the teachers in charge of their own classrooms.

Mark Melton
Mark Melton

Why do people think there's money in the charter business?  Someone needs to explain this to me.  Uplift is a non-profit corporation...even if it earned profits it wouldn't be passing them on to anyone.  In fact, charters only receive about 80% of the money, per-pupil, that traditional districts receive.  If you look at their financials you'll see they're dependent on private donations to make ends meet.  And take a look at their list of donors in their annual report.  You'll see that the people behind Uplift are donating large portions of their personal assets to the school...the money is only flowing one way, and that's into the school...not out of it. 

Sam
Sam

There are not many kids in Deep Ellum, nor in Downtown or up Ross Avenue (closing Fannin). South Dallas high schools have a precipitous drop in enrollment.  Where are the students for a school in Deep Ellum?

Hometown Boy
Hometown Boy

I can't help but shake my head when I read all of the claims of "re-segregating" DISD if we allow charters to exist.  The demographics of Uplift are no different than DISD; they draw tight boundary lines to give neighborhood kids preference in the lottery.  Their urban schools (Peak, Williams, and Hampton) are all over 90% free and reduced lunch and less than 3% Anglo per the TEA website.

And please, while DISD is 95% non-Anglo, the top DISD magnet schools (which charter naysayers understandably take pride in) do NOT reflect DISD's overall demographics....the Talented and Gifted program is only 32% free and reduced lunch (vs. 87% for DISD overall) and 39% Anglo.Give kids and parents a choice on what's best for their child...and stop with all of the hypocritical arguments.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

I can't help but shake my head when I see another rag seller coming at me with his hand out for my wallet.

Charters take money.Charters do not improve any DISD campus for the kids stuck on that campus.Charters do not give DISD neighborhoods a sense of community that makes middle class families want to return to the district to raise their children.

Charters do not fix DISD.Charters enrich only the charter operator.

FIX DISD.Make DISD like HPISD--a district where families become closer neighbors and stronger communities.

Why pay charters to come in and run schools differently.How about instead we JUST RUN DISD SCHOOLS DIFFERENTLY AND SAVE OVERTAXED TAXPAYERS SOME MONEY?

Hometown Boy
Hometown Boy

And literally thousands of kids fall thru the cracks in the interim? No thanks. They deserve better than to believe that "hope is a strategy" while Carla Ranger and Adam Medrano sell their interests down the river so that they can continue to count on teacher union votes to keep their seats. I'll continue to place my bet on parents making the best decision for their children instead of teacher unions full of conflicts because charter school teachers dont join unions or pay dues. How terribly sad.

biscuit98
biscuit98

Wilonksy--Why don't you give Ed Fuller a call so you have at least a simple version of the facts regarding charters

:http://fullerlook.wordpress.co...

Fuller is a nationally known researcher and he sliced and diced the data on IDEA coming into Austin and taking over. They cherrypick the motivated and dump low performers, exactly like Uplift. Once you look at his data, you'll understand UPlift's data a lot bettter. By the way, did Uplift remove North Hills from their presentation. A school with 5% low income shouldn't be compared to Dallas ISD with 88% poverty.

Also, ask Uplift for a breakdown of SAT and ACT scores by campus so that North Hills and its success with the middle and upper class are removed. Ask them how many  students were signed up for DCCCD.

By gosh, by darn, why not ask Fuller for a presentation before the City Council on the many ways these big charters cherrypick and get rid of problem students? How would the Dallas oligarchy (this includes the board of uplift) like some truth spoken to power?  Not at all?   

TraneM
TraneM

The cherrypicking you speak of has been proven false in several recent unfair park posts...do some looking

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Q:Please tell me how the charters respond to an unmotivated, intentional non-learner.

A:They don't have any.

Semantically, you're right.  They don't drive around DISD handing out applications to only A students.

But guess what kind of parent goes and gets the application?  The parent of A students.

We have magnets for those kids.  Magnets don't require a whole new crew of people to take our money.

The solution is more magnets, not a private company.

Ross3700
Ross3700

The cherry-picking is built into the lottery...only those highly motivated parents who agree to the conditions of the Charter are in the lottery. Then, if these students fail or misbehave they are dumped back into the public school system. 

TraneM
TraneM

The DISD schools need competition.

Everyone keeps talking about accountability, but there is none at DISD. They can't even do a field trip to the movies right.

The people of Dallas also need to be accountable...all of these people in an uproar need to organize. The trustees are elected with hundreds of votes. But all the detractors are loud anytime an article is posted here.

Hometown Boy
Hometown Boy

Robert, I'd urge you to look at Commended rates vs. Passing rates....they are much closer aligned with college readiness, as well as SAT and ACT scores.  If the primary job of our K-12 system is to prepare students for post-secondary education, then that's what we should be focusing on.

Guest
Guest

And ignore the majority of DISD students who will never set foot on a college campus?  As long as people think high school is just pre-college, it will fail the majority of DISD students. 

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Allow Dallas to randomly assign kids to charters, mandate that the child must attend the charter or another campus owned by the same charter company, mandate that noncompliant kids will face truancy fines.....and then let's see the charter school's test results.

Guest
Guest

And if the charter school kids turn out to be exactly the same as the DISD kids, can we all agree that both sides are zelots that would sacrifice our children's educations to prove broader points about the positive/negative effects of government/private programs using union/civil-servant/at-will employment arrangements?

If so, sign me up! 

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Taxpayers pay a lot of money to educate kids.

The public-school model isn't broken--it's the people in charge at DISD and the trustees.

HP's public-school model works just fine.

Texas doesn't really have teacher unions.  The "union" exists but they can only make sure the district doesn't violate the contract the district wrote.

Charters take our money, they don't fix the district, they don't educate the neediest, toughest kids.  Why in the world would you hand over your wallet to them?

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

HP's population of students is certainly no smarter than DISD kids.  Period.  That's a common misconception, but it isn't true.  90% of DISD kids are on level and doing well.

The population of students isn't the problem in any district--it's the leadership, the leadership, the leadership that incentivizes the wrong behaviors bc the leadership is corrupt and greedy.

The reason to oppose charter schools precisely because they are Public Schools 2.0.They are an expensive version of what we already have.

Frankly, I would prefer we just give every kid in DISD a voucher for private school.  Let donors cover the rest.  THAT and only that would empower parents, revitalize the city, and educate kids well.

Fix public or give vouchers.  Charters are a waste of money.  They hurt non-charter kids.  I'm not okay with that.

I am a parent and a teacher.  This is waaay more than ideological to me personally.I, too, want the best model. 

Guest
Guest

 "The public-school model isn't broken--it's the people in charge at DISD and the trustees."

Bullshit.  There isn't an effective urban school district in the country.  Not a single one.  Our trustees or the DISD are not uniquely bad.  As a country, we haven't found the right model for teaching this particular population of students. 

HP's public school model works because it serves a different population of students, a population of students that would achieve well anywhere they went to school. 

And you missed the point of my post.  I don't give a shit if teachers are in unions or not.  I don't give a shit if students are educated in public schools or charters (which really are just public schools by a different name).  I don't give a shit what model works to educate students.  I just want that model found.  I think both sides of the charter school debate care far more about fighting the ideological fights than they do about educating students. 

Your posts are a good illustration of that.  I have yet to see you offer any evidence that charter schools hurt students.  If, on the whole, students are no worse if charter schools exist than if they don't exist, then the only reason to oppose them is out of a stupid ideological turf war mentality that has no business affecting public policy debates.    

Oak Cliff Townie
Oak Cliff Townie

In my business very bad numbers are looked at from top to bottom..

These kind of good numbers and we start checking the Books .

 

Bill Betzen
Bill Betzen

The chart at the start of this article indicates that DISD is significantly better than the average Dallas charter school by every measurement.  That same chart indicates Uplift is better than DISD on the same measurements.  Then the article quotes research on charter schools in general indicating they do not skim the best students from public schools.  We must NOT get the idea that is what Uplift is necessarily doing.   It is very possible that Uplift has more selective student criteria which is helping them both select, and then keep, more high performing students.  Is anyone checking?  

Wylie H.
Wylie H.

The Uplift rep at the City Council meeting described their selection criteria in detail. They use a strict lottery process to pick entrants, with the only (I believe) exception being siblings of existing students (who are allowed preference due to the efficiencies gained from allowing a parent/guardian to transport both students to/from the same location).

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

And how many unmotivated, truant, fighting kids sign up for the charter lottery?That would be zero.That's the key element underlying charter "success":  only motivated parents and kids even sign up.  No need to cherry pick bc the cherry crop picks itself for them.Kicking kids out?  Not necessary.  After the parents of any problem child are repeatedly called to the charter to deal with rule infractions, the parents themselves pull the child out voluntarily.

Charter success stats are false.The goal is to get tax dollars without accountability.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Well, that's on the school board.They are the problem there.

At least you can vote them out.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

I am opposed to charters bc they take tax dollars and they do NOTHING for Dallas and the vast number of KIDS IN DISD.The only way to benefit all kids in this city is to fix DISD--not give money to Todd Williams and his crew so they can have the motivated kids while all other kids suffer.How to fix DISD?Turn every single neighborhood campus into a "magnet" where you have to obey the dress code, pass all classes, obey the behavior code, and pass the state tests.  Send all other kids to alternative campuses.

End race-based hiring, curriculum, and preferences.End race-based, crony, and nepotism hires.FBI audit the district and make arrests.

Only then will the middle class return to DISD.Charters take our money and give the vast majority of our kids nothing.

FIX DISD.

Bbetzen
Bbetzen

DISD is telling the truth when they claim that the dropout rate is going down and the test scores are going up.  Four years ago I became aware of the statistics that indicated that DISD had only been graduating as few as 40% of their 9th graders within 4 years.  Mayor Leppert was admitting these terrible numbers in public, the first time a Dallas Mayor ever acknowledged how bad the number were in public. ( http://schoolarchiveproject.bl... )  We started to be serious about the goal of getting the graduation rate above 50%!  In 2011 we did it with over the number of graduates that year equaling 52% of the 9th grade class from 4 years earlier.  The progress has continued.  Look at this report: http://schoolarchiveproject.bl... 

Bbetzen
Bbetzen

First, there are 18 states in the US with a lower number of immigrants than Finland.  They are not doing  better.  Second, the neighboring nations to Finland with virtually the same demographics are NOT doing that well.  They are more or less like the US in their students achievement.  Third, your logic is frighteningly similar to the thinking that was the backbone of the "separate but equal" mentality that our nation continues to suffer from, but it is not spoken.

You are correct about poverty and health care issues.  There is much less poverty in Finland and health care is universal.  Those issues are eliminated. However, there are still things we can learn from the Finns, if we want to learn.  That "wanting to learn" is the issue.  It is the issue for 7th graders and it is still the issue for 42 year old men.  For the sake of our children we must be willing to learn.

Guest
Guest

"How do the schools with a majority population of poor, urban, minority students do in Finland?"

They don't exist.  Finland is 99% Scandinavian.  The closest thing to a substantial "minority" population are Swedes. 

Guest
Guest

 Almost any school in the U.S. with the demographics of the average Finland school performs very well.  How do the schools with a majority population of poor, urban, minority students do in Finland?

Ket354
Ket354

(menaing =>meaning)

Ket354
Ket354

That's the real question isn't it: Of the pool of students who cared enough to sign up for the lottery, was there a difference between the Charter schools and the DISD.

Otherwise the selection bias removes all menaing from the data. To DISD board members have access to a decent statistician?

Anon
Anon

to be fair, I don't feel like my DISD dollars are accountable to anyone

Guest
Guest

There was a study that came out within the last year that showed that many (if not most) students who entered the lottery to get into a charter school but who didn't get in did just as well as the students who got in.

If that study holds up, the common thread for success would seem to be parental involvement (or the child's own motivation for success... I guess that could be an option).

bbetzen
bbetzen

Downtown Resident, while what you say sounds very good the tragic reality is that the parents who take the time to choose are a very small minority, and in Dallas active parents can secure an excellent eduation for their children, probably one of the best in the U.S..  But they must be active.

Less than 10% of students are able to take advantage of that and it comes very close re-segregating DISD if you look at the patterns. We must re-focus on EVERY school and have none that are bad.  It can be done.  We must do it. Charters are only a solution for that 10%, and they weaken the other schools in the process and divert resources. 

The best educational system in the world has no charters, no school choice, and they do very well: Finland.  We need to be studying what they do.  One thing they do is they have no middle schools and students are with only one teacher from 1st to 6th grade, then they continue in the same school till they are finished with 9th grade.  That original teacher remains available to them.  Relationships are much more personal.  If we were to eliminate all middle schools and move to a K-8 system followed by high school our dropout rate would really fall!  See  http://schoolarchiveproject.bl... 

Downtown Resident
Downtown Resident

I'm not much of a fan of charters but I find myself wondering why if your response we're the only reason I had to base my distaste on. You seem to be demonizing charters because the students that attend have parents that take the time and effort to seek out better educational avenues for their child. And maybe as a result of having a student body made up of primarily engaged students and parents the environment is more conducive to learning as opposed an environment where the teacher spends as much time acting as a disciplinarian as a teacher. This does not make the stats "false".

You say the goal is tax dollars without accountability but the accountability seems to be built into the system by the parents through the virtue of their selection of a charter versus the easy default of the local public school. Accountability dictated by parents would be preferred over accountability from bureaucrats on Ross Ave or policies like NCLB.

jfpo
jfpo

I need to get in the charter school business or the Jesus business. That's obviously where the money is.

Marie
Marie

All charter schools are not good. I've worked at a horrible one in Oak Cliff and I voluntarily quit because of the administration and their policies. The administration does not want teachers to  teach and they vocally admit they do not care what the students' learn.  I believe the administration has tampered with state testing.  We had 8th graders using multiplication charts to help them with their math on Monday but could magically pass Taks test on Tuesday. The students at this school are definitely capable of being awesome students but they just aren't giving the chance to be. 

This particular charter school is definitely in it for the money and a chance for the administration to beef up their resumes. The teachers have no power and since they are not protected under a teacher's union the teachers are constantly harassed and threatened with their job. 

This charter school hires only inexperienced friends and family as their administration. They actually hired a woman to be a teacher trainer and she only taught for two years and was also alternatively certified. I am an alternatively certified teacher but my undergraduate degree is closely related to the education field and I could not imagine being a teacher trainer after my second year of teaching! 

The things I saw at this school are disgusting and one day I hope the state will actually go in there and doing something about it.

JM
JM

OK, back to the discussion. If, per the excerpts above, charter schools seem to neither harm nor help student achievement in nearby public schools, and have no real edge other than graduation rates, which might well be attributed to the fact that charter students have, by virtue of pursuing the application process, demonstrated an above average commitment to education,why are we diverting public education dollars their way?  The pie is only so big.

Guest
Guest

Ok.  If, per the excerpts above, charters schools have a slight edge in graduation and college graduation rates despite not skimming the best students from public schools (on average taking students with lower scores than in public schools), without any apparent negative effect on surrounding public schools, why are we not working on both tracks:  trying to improve both public and charter schools?  This at least doubles our chances of finding some solutions to problems that thus far we no answers for (actually many more than double because each charter can try its own approach). 

And each student coming out of a public school to go to a charter also reduces the public school's expenses.  It only makes the public school smaller.  Public schools still have the same money to spend on each student, charter schools or no charter schools. 

RTGolden
RTGolden

Not disagreeing with your conclusion, just your inclusion of fact.  The study did not mention anywhere that charter schools have a higher rate of COLLEGE graduation.  There was a slight edge in high school graduation and slight increase in college attendance.

As has been stated here, it's easy to get 100% acceptance of your high school graduates to a college if the students live in Dallas County.  Have your teachers hand out the applications to DCCCD, make the students fill them out, and turn them in en masse to DCCCD admissions.

The better statistic would be the percentage of charter graduates vs percentage of public graduates succeeding in college and walking out with a degree.

Also interesting was the mention of e-charters.  It has been postulated here and in other forums that the charter school model is nothing more than a land grab.  Interesting to note there is now a study showing that charter schools providing in-home internet based studies underperform compared to their brick-and-mortar brethren.

Wylie H.
Wylie H.

Wilonsky... don't you ever take a day off?

Robert Wilonsky
Robert Wilonsky

What -- isn't this how most people spend a Sunday, reading RAND Corp. reports?

Gabe
Gabe

I just spent the last hour doing 3d modeling of random buildings in Lakewood for Google Earth...which is nerdier? There's no way to tell. 

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin

so does that make me sick that Im here reading this on Sunday?  Oh how i hate the 2 sundays between the super bowl and Nascar

Wylie H.
Wylie H.

I wouldn't know, I'm too busy re-skimming "The Balanced Vision Plan for the Trinity River Corridor."

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