Another Texas Icon's Caught Between Dublin Bottling Works, Plano-Based Dr Pepper: Big Red

Categories: Biz, Dish
MapleandMotorMachine.jpg
The set-up at Maple & Motor. For now.
Ever since Jack Perkins got his Dublin Bottling Works soda fountain at Maple & Motor, well, let's say I've had way too many cane-sugar soft drinks in recent weeks. (May I recommend mixing the Tart-N-Sweet Lemonade, Cherry Limeade and Dublin Lemon-Lime with a twist of real lime? You're welcome.) But I've been informed that if I want to keep drinking that cane-sugar-sweetened Big Red, another Texas icon, well, I'd best hustle: Once his current supply runs out, says Perkins, that'll be that.

Perkins was told in recent days that Dublin's out of the Big Red business. And he's "bummed," he says, if only because "Big Red is surging, and the cane-sugar Big Red, since I've had it, is selling better than the regular Big Red. So I'm disappointed." He's also a little suspicious -- because, after all, in 2008 Plano-based Dr Pepper Snapple Group snapped up part-ownership in Austin-based Big Red. And we all know what Dr Pepper Snapple Group did the last time Dublin tried to sell one of its products.

Gary Smith, Big Red's chief executive officer, tells Unfair Park he'd rather not comment on whether this latest dust-up involving Dublin and Dr Pepper has to do with the demise of Dublin Dr Pepper. He very kindly says it'd be "inappropriate for me to comment" and that those kind of questions should be directed towards Plano. All he will say is that Dr Pepper Snapple has the right to bottle and distribute Big Red in Dallas. "That's Dr Pepper Snapple's territory," he says. "That is and always has been Dr Pepper Snapple's territory."

Jeff Kloster, owner of Dublin Bottling Works, won't comment on whatever's going on, and Dr Pepper Snapple HQ says to talk to Smith. But those familiar with the situation say that for the last year, Dublin has been bottling cane-sugar Big Red in returnable bottles, as well as producing the fountain version that goes to restaurants like Maple & Motor. The company also distributed Big Red's retro soda, the kind you'll find in six packs in, say, Central Market. This sudden about-face demands an explanation. At least, as far as Perkins is concerned.

"You set up your business to do certain things, then all of the sudden someone decides they're not going to allow that something to happen," he says. "Maybe there's a good reason for that on a corporate level, but I can't fathom that in my mind. I can't understand it, and I'm not a dumb guy."

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70 comments
Singletonjim
Singletonjim

Jealosy on the part of DPSG plain and simple....they'd rather shoot theirself in the foot than see someone else suceed....it's sad...Dublin was only helping spread the good news and putting a huge positive spin on the Dr Pepper name by keeping history and nostalgia alive...I only see fans leaving Dr Pepper in droves out of frustration with the stupid politics for other good old brands

Djbrianflorence
Djbrianflorence

I think Coca-cola, if they were smart, can use this as an opportunity to reformulate Pibb Xtra back to Mr pibb and release it as a real sugar product.

Lweb_2000
Lweb_2000

Once again Big Corporation stepping on small town business! Greedy people to say the least. I back Dublin Bottling Company all the way-they are family friendly business and treat the customers as if they were a part of their family. Does Dr Pepper Snapple Crapation do they? say not! I was a avid Dr Pepper drinker and now have converted to Coke!

mac
mac

Fortunately Stig, it's owned by Triple XXX in Indiana, and I think they're seeing Dollar signs now because people are going after the Dublin version of the beverage because of Dr P's poor decisions.

In fact, I think Triple XXX is not so naive to try what DPSG did because they're seeing as we are that their sales are plummeting from these bad decisions. They probably are working on a way to expand Dublin's Distribution to increase sales.

Cboswellcit101
Cboswellcit101

obese soccer moms with 5 obsese kids give this no thought, they be the biggest consumer.  suck it

Judd D. Bradbury
Judd D. Bradbury

I think I can easily explain this for Mr. Perkins. Big Red set up the Dallas territory with a franchise agreement to sell their product through the DPSG bottling company. DPSG has a contract to sell Big Red in Dallas, Dublin Bottling Works does not have a contract to sell big red in Dallas.

R C
R C

Big Red is produced and distributed by various independent soft drink bottlers including: Dr Pepper Snapple Group, CCE, and Pepsi Bottling Group under license from Big Red, Inc., based in Waco, Texas.In 2008, Dr Pepper Snapple Group purchased a minority interest in Big Red, Inc. Dr Pepper distributes almost 80% of the product that Big Red sells annually.

R C
R C

THIS IS FROM ME A FORMER LIFELONG DR PEPPER DRINKER>>>>>>>Everyone needs to understand the "REAL" reason DPSG did what they did....You see DrPepper,Waco,Texas has always had the "Legal Rights" to the "Original Sugar Formula DrPepper" since 1885 & then  also the "Syrup Formula DrPepper" since apx late 1970's,due to high sugar prices....Dublin Bottling Works(1891 - ?year) ,changed names to "Dublin DrPepper Bottling Company (?year - January,11 2012)"  only had the "Franchise Rights" since 1891 - January,11 2012 to bottle the "Original Sugar Formula DrPepper",within a 44 mile radius area around Dublin,Texas,they could've had the "Franchise Rights" to bottle the "Syrup Formula DrPepper",however they chose to bottle the "Original DrPepper Sugar Formual" to stay true to the "Orginal DrPepper Sugar Formula",you can blame that on Mr.Sam Houston Prim,then Mr. William "Bill" Kloster,look it up!!!!!  (God Bless them that they did).  So...Everyone....You need to understand what "Dublin Bottling Works (1891 - ?year)",then known as "Dublin DrPepper Bottling Company (?year - January,11 2012)" really did.....You see,they made an agreement w/ an Independent Bottler in Temple,Texas(?year) to bottle the"Original Sugar Formula DrPepper",and that Bottler in Temple,Texas  "distrubuted" it to stores,outside of the "Original 44 mile Franchise Area" that Dublin Bottling Works aka: Dublin DrPepper Bottling Company(1891 - January,11 2012) had an agreement with DrPepper,Waco,Texas(1885) in 1891,then Cadburry Schweppes(Wikipedia),then Triarc(Google), then Altria Group Inc. (aka Phillip Morris in Wikipedia)then aka DrPepper/SevenUp Inc.(Dr Pepper in Wikipedia),then now known as DrPepper/Snapple Group,Plano Texas (today)........Dublin Bottling Works (aka Dublin DrPepper Bottling Company),Dublin,Texas also added the name "Dublin" to the DrPepper Logo,they also changed "1885" to "1891"on the DrPepper Logo,and they also changed the "Design" on the bottle.....which is Illegal ,and against DrPepper/Snapple Group corporate guidlines,and also known as "Changing the Logo & Design" without authorization,....this is why Dublin Bottling Works (aka Dublin DrPepper Bottling Company),Dublin,Texas......Lost their "Franchise Rights" to bottle the "Original DrPepper Sugar Formula"........AND so You(DPSG) WON,but You(DPSG) lost something to .......So DPSG what are you going to do now?.......WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO NOW DPSG??????.........I Have an Idea on what you(DPSG) should do.........If you (DPSG) want to know what you should do,and what you(DPSG) lost,and how to get "IT" back,contact me,@  74firebirdtransam@gmail.com and I will tell you how to get "IT" back,and get back what you(DPSG) lost.......Then theres "BIG RED".....that's another story for later.

Tyler
Tyler

ARE YOU SERIOUS!?!?!?! DPSG is pissed because they lost out on the Dublin shutdown, well thats YOUR fault for killing a small towns pride, and a part of your companys  history! Larry Young, may God have mercy on your soul for what you have done to us this year. Your days are numbered......

Patricia Mulkey
Patricia Mulkey

DPS does not seem to understand they are destroying any customer loyalty that they have left.  

DaTruth
DaTruth

I tried Big Red when I first moved to Texas. So disgusting.

Bmarvel
Bmarvel

Gives the lie to the right-wing myth that free markets give the consumer a wider range of choices.  In fact everywhere in every circumstance free markets tend toward monopoly.

Jerry Huchingson
Jerry Huchingson

DPS is discusting ! Apparently they didn't the news report with their Dr Pepper fountain in the trash where it belongs.@ Jack Perkins-give away Dublin Big Red-ask for donation.

Will Gibson
Will Gibson

"Dr Pepper going to claim it holds copyright to the word water" 

monsanto is already working on it.

Rob
Rob

As a lifelong Dr Pepper drinker, and also a fan of Big Red, this infuriates me to no end. I will never drink another DPSG product again. Nothing but Coke and Pepsi products from here on out. I know they are big corporations too, but at least they didn't betray Texas and bully a small independent bottler who was loyal to them for 120 years.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin

Look, we all know DPSBG is the big bad mean guy ok, but if Dublin truly is selling outside their market and violating other bottling region and their own agreement then they are getting what they deserve.  It sucks but that why there are contracts and agreements. 

OD
OD

There is no frachise limitations for the Big Red fountain syrup, only the canned or bottled drink.  Dublin Bottling Works had unlimited authority to distribute cane sugar sweetened fountain syrup.

mac
mac

RC - First, Wiki and Google are not good sources for names and such. You lead to getting your argument debunked, as it will be now.

Secondly, DPSG was producing the beverage with the Dublin design on them in PLASTIC bottles prior to the suit. This has lead to questions among us Dublin DP fans that they sued because people realized that this version was inferior to the Dublin version (I know, I tried).

Third, They have had Dublin on the bottles for DECADES, and no one complained. NEVER in the 10 years I head a peep from DPSG about the word Dublin on it. It's now suddenly - a year or two, that this is a problem?

Fourth, The canned version - done in Temple for YEARS canned the beverage WITH the words DUBLIN on it and the Kloster story, as well as Dublin's WEB SITE on it. If this had been a problem, why haven't they said anything in 10 years? Fifth - DPSG allowed the "Violation" of changing the logo and design for AT LEAST 11 years (when I first got the beverage), and possibly more. So again, fault with DPSG.

And Sixth - Dublin not too long ago was allowed to sell in a 6 county territory - which here in Texas means that it's MUCH MORE than 44 mile radius. The 44 mile radius consisted of The counties where Hico, Stephenville (Erath) and Dublin were (possibly Comanche).

The truth of the matter is, Dublin was selling quite well, people could (and still can) tell the difference between the Dublin and Temple versions, and DPSG coudln't handle it so they sued using questionable reasons.

DuckDuckGoose
DuckDuckGoose

 Mix in a paragraph RC ... I'm not even going to try to read that in it's present format.

Scruffygeist
Scruffygeist

They are a little bit bigger than some pissed off North Texans, you know. It probably doesn't register a blip on their national picture.

R C
R C

I like Big Red and thats Da Truth!

DuckDuckGoose
DuckDuckGoose

Rick Riordan novel "Big Red Tequila" set in San Antonio is sorta fun.

Me, I'm a Pomac fan ...

R C
R C

 above coment was said by Bmarvel a left-wing socialist,who belives that free makets should die and we should all feed at the goverment's teet.

Anon
Anon

this market, by definition, is a monopoly. it's called a monopolistically competitive market because only one person can legally sell the "Pepsi" branded soft drinks, but there is so much choice in that market that prices tend to function as they would in a "free" market. why else are most branded sodas all about the same price when you go to the gas station?the loss of a single option in the oversaturated soft drink market does not prove anything about markets, and it certainly has nothing to do with the right wing. you think every time a car maker discontinues a vehicle, or an electronics maker discontinues a product that it's some conspiracy to hurt consumers? it's a calculated choice. anytime a company stops producing a product, it risks alienating the customers who enjoyed that product.

mac
mac

Plus, both have better incentives to drink the beverage and save up points to received prizes. 40 points for a 20 ounce drink, 500 for a T-Shirt.

If you go to a football or baseball game and collect the caps off the 20 ounce bottles on the ground, you can make those add up quickly without overkill on the drink. (Note, be kind and put the bottles themselves in the trash).DP's incentives? - points for facebook aps. Untangible, and cheap. Figures.

TheRealDirtyP1
TheRealDirtyP1

I'm with you, as much as I like both products. I'm tired of hearing "they weren't doing anything wrong, DPSG are fascist pigs!" from the everyday man. If they were breaking their agreed to rules, then that's that.

mac
mac

They weren't Scott - in fact, DPSG was bottling a PLASTIC bottle version of the drink about a year prior to this suit.

They also allowed on the Dublin canned version (which had to be canned outside of the Dublin Bottling Company), to have a WEB SITE on the can to where it could be purchased online. If Dublin was in violation of this, why did DPSG allow that address to be put on the can?

Oh, and BTW - Dublin can only bottle, and I NEVER - repeat NEVER saw the bottled version of the drink anywhere outside that 6-county territory. The canned version - which again Temple/Plano/Waco canned? - yeah, brining into question a few things. 

There's a lot more to the story than DPSG is willing to admit. The result though is this - it's barely selling in Texas anymore, and other states have been mentioning they're stopping serving it in their stores. I'm seeing rows upon rows of the beverage sitting on shelves while store brands (particularly HEB's - a Texas grocer's - Dr. B) are selling out.

Jason
Jason

Wait.  You do know that, despite their best efforts, Dr. Pepper is not a popular soda in most of America, right?  

Bmarvel
Bmarvel

RC,Do you mean feed at the government teet like the railroads, steel industry, energy industry, automakers, banks, big agriculture? Or, and the airlines. I forgot them.I almost never use the "i" word in my comments, but here I'll make an exception: Your comment is ignorant, not only in its assessment of my politics -- What a rich laugh my friends would get from my being labeled a "socialist"! -- but in your astonishing ignorance about  economics. Unregulated free markets tend by their nature to anarchy, then to monopoly.  (An example: The drug cartels.) So it is, so it has always been. Do some reading in economic history, for heaven's sakes. 

  

Bmarvel
Bmarvel

Anon,I don't want to get into  legal or a biz-ad discussion over this. I just want to point out the realities of the "free" market as far as the consumer is concerned.  So let's take another example of a predatory soft-drink maker. Coca-Cola some time ago went on a campaign of buying up soft drink makers, some of which competed with its own products, some of which did not, and systematically shutting them down. The result -- and anybody under the age of, say, 40 can attest to this-- is the death of dozens of brands which did not have the financial heft to battle Coca-Cola. Where are Grapette, Delaware Punch, Wink, Hires, and many other classics now? Occasionally you run into a bottle in boutique soda shop, at an obscene price.  Coke has bottled up the formulae for these drinks, but will sometimes sell the rights to produce a small amount to some manufacturer somewhere, usually outside the U.S. (You can still get Delaware Punch, if you know where to look, but only as raw syrup). The market for these "relic" beverages is carefully controlled by limiting the area in which in can be sold.Is the loss of variety in the soft drink industry really that big a deal to consumers? Not on the scale of drug manufacturers' control over vital drugs, say. I have just this week had some very personal experience in this area.But my basic argument stands. The so-called free market tends by its very nature -- and with the tacit support of the legal system -- to reduce, not augment consumer choices. Dr Pepper is a prime  example of this, but anybody who's been paying attention for a few decades can pick out hundreds of others. Look at the slow creep of "house" brands across grocers' shelves.So Dr Pepper can do what it wants with more-or-less impunity. But we need to realize as consumers this is a consequence of the system we have chosen and our continued support of monopolists' brands.

    

Dr Pepper Satan Group
Dr Pepper Satan Group

This is such a bad business decision on so many levels - but let's focus on the worst part of DPS Plano's idiocy: waging war on consumers. 

After DPS asserted its "distribution rights" to have Dublin Dr Pepper removed from the marketplace has anyone seen any evidence the company has since USED those distribution rights to replace Dublin Dr Pepper with its own cane-sugared Dr. Pepper in "the marketplace" to insure customers who prefer that to the corporate corn syrup version have uninterrupted access to cane-sugared Dr Pepper in cans, bottles, and at soda fountains such as Maple & Motor?

Why is DPS not rushing sales people to Maple & Motor to sign them up for "authorized" cane-sugar sweetened fountain packs of Big Red once their Dublin Bottling fountain packs are exhausted -- so supplies to consumers aren't interrupted?

Here's the money-quote:

"The cane-sugar Big Red, since I've had it, is selling better than the (DPS corn syrup) Big Red," said Maple & Motor's Jack Perkins.

This is about KILLING the cane-sugared versions customers prefer over the corporate corn syrup sweetened formulas NOT simply a "distribution contract dispute."

DPS is waging war on consumers - an interesting business decision by a so-called consumer products company.

StellaTex
StellaTex

 We had bottled Dublin DP in Austin.

Dr Pepper Snapple Group still sucks, regardless of the illegality of Dublin Dr Pepper's sales.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin

canning, bottling, fountain, whatever, if you dont have distribution rights outside the 6 county area you agreed to, well this is what you get, you have encroached on other distributors rightful area

mac
mac

We know Jason - I myself have been to a state where it nor Mr. Pibb are served in restaurants (Massachusetts, and even some of New Hampshire).

Patricia's point is that in the states that it is popular it's losing its support because of these decisions - not so much Dublin DP, but the whole 7Up fiasco with the guy being fired for helping cats.

mac
mac

I see your point, but one thing - monopolies CAN be foreced to be broken, such as Ma Bell and the Baby Bells (phone company - Southwestern Bell, unfortunately then taken over not too long ago by ATT).

I do think though that DPSG doesn't realize their dream of a monopoly is hugely flawed and is currently costing them millions. Those do add up quickly.

And - yeah, bottling up into one organization all the beverages instead of expanding a franchise (especially one that had for years accepted the Dublin labeling)... is currently disasterious. I do know for a fact that Plano's version of the Imperial Pure Cane Sugar beverage is NOT selling at any store I"ve been to because people know it's not Dublin.

Bmarvel
Bmarvel

mac,You mistake my argument. I'm not saying the recent shutdown of Dublin Dr Pepper was not "legit," within the laws that govern such transactions. Nor am i saying that competition among the remaining bottlers has reached the level of anarchy or monopoly.I'm saying that competition has reduced the choices available to the consumer and that this is by no means a situation peculiar to the soft drink industry. It is a necessary feature of the kind of capitalist free-market system we have adopted, where regulation, in general is weak allowing a few biggies to dominate almost every industry. (Microsoft, anyone?)The reason is plain to see. The natural aim of competition is to dominate by eliminating or acquiring competitors. A company can do this by legal means, because our legal system generally limits government regulation of ("interference with")  market forces.In the lack of ANY regulation, commercial enterprises are free to use any and all means to buy or kill off competitors, even in the case of the cartels, violence. Anarchy prevails. Eventually, one enterprise succeeds in destroying its competitors. Monopoly.The place to examine this principle in operation is the early days of Standard Oil, when regulation was not just week but non-existent. Standard Oil is one of the reasons, if fact, hard-put consumers eventually clamored for stronger regulation of the market.Will consumers of Dublin Dr Pepper demand regulation of the soda pop industry? I doubt it. Of Microsoft? Possibly. The strength of governrment regulation, finally, will depend on the will and determination of consumers -- that is, voters.               

 

mac
mac

Anarchy - no rules and no regs. Anything goes.

Monopoly - take over to become one huge organization.

As far as I know - in defense in the beverage companies - all of these suits and takeovers were legit (even if we don't agree with them), and therefore no anarchy.

And there are three main companies - Coke, Pepsi and DPSG. Out of those, only one can be seen as a monopoly - having a takeover - DPSG (DP took over Snapple Group).

You need to realize that stuff like this is nothing like Drug Cartels either, but that's an argument I'm not even going to bother trying to educate you on.

Glen2gs
Glen2gs

Grapette is now owned by Wal-Mart (of all people)....The REAL question is why is is DPSG fighting so hard to keep Cane Sugar Soft Drinks off of the Market?

mac
mac

Hires is still in production. I have also seen Grapette. And I've seen both at the same price as Dublin DP was individually ($1.50 average).

There is also a DPSG flavor called Cactus Juice (or a variation) that is not produced everywhere, so long thought extinct. It's a variation of what was originally a 'Lil Abner decorated beverage.

One other pont Bmarvel, Dublin was home of DP days, and the factory had been producing it for 121 YEARS. IT was a hot tourist spot (in spite of being a small town), and people from all over got to know and love DP itself because of the factory.

It's one thing to monopolize, but to pretty much take away a tradition in a town, which has lead to a national boycott (yeah, I'm reading of restaurants in other states - not incluing Massachusetts, which I had already known not to serve DP or Mr. Pibb in their locales), of DPSG.

It's also almost fully stocked at stores where I live. It's not selling. Free market is still good, it's how it's used that factors in.

I've seen many free market strategies cause huge expansion - Blue Bell Ice Cream is one of these. They don't have to pay a stocking fee in stores - yet other brands are also there too - because people are allowed to have choices. And they're now in 16-18 states (been a while since I've counted).

DPSG - between Dublin DP and Big Red and the firing of a worker simply because he took care of feral cats - but then 7Up not doing a lot to help relocate the cast ($5,000 isn't a lot to help take care of cats), is going to end up going bankrupt because of bad free market decisions.

StellaTex
StellaTex

This is my stance, as well.  Well put.

mac
mac

Cynical, they were referring to the Syrup containers you mix with carbonated water for the fountains.

They've been selling the bottled version of Imperial Pure Cane Sugar (sans the Dublin moniker on them) some time even prior to the settlement. It's one reason many of us are calling foul. ;)

mac
mac

DPSG has a partial ownership of Big Red, not all of it.

Additionally, when we read about Dublin DP being removed - there was NO mention of Big Red.Anyone reading up knew Big Red was going to continue to be produced, and had been mentioned even in articles announcing the shut down.

You read me right - there were DIRECT quotes mentioning that Big Red was going to still be produced by Dublin Bottling Works.

NOW DPSG is putting the kibosh on it.

Anon - do the math - DPSG is seeing once again a small mom and pop factory is producing a superior product and wants the money.

cynical old bastard
cynical old bastard

 You can purchase the bottles.  That was one of the points above.

"access to cane-sugared Dr Pepper in cans, bottles, and at soda fountains such as Maple & Motor?"

Robert Kelly
Robert Kelly

 so you can get the syrup at Tom Thumb?

Doctor Pooper
Doctor Pooper

This=====>

Why is DPS not rushing sales people to Maple & Motor to sign them up for "authorized" cane-sugar sweetened fountain packs of Big Red once their Dublin Bottling fountain packs are exhausted -- so supplies to consumers aren't interrupted?Here's the money-quote:"The cane-sugar Big Red, since I've had it, is selling better than the (DPS corn syrup) Big Red," said Maple & Motor's Jack Perkins.This is about KILLING the cane-sugared versions customers prefer over the corporate corn syrup sweetened formulas NOT simply a "distribution contract dispute."

cynical old bastard
cynical old bastard

"...has anyone seen any evidence the company has since USED those distribution rights to replace Dublin Dr Pepper with its own cane-sugared Dr. Pepper..."

Yup.  Tom Thumb at Preston Forest.

Anon
Anon

enforcing a distribution agreement is "waging war on consumers"? it really doesn't make a difference whether they are using their distributions rights - they're the ones who own them. going to someone's house and taking things just because they haven't used them or don't plan to is called theft. not sure why you want to think this is any less an infraction of a contract.

Guesty McG
Guesty McG

What a stunningly ignorant comment.

Bill Kloster respected the territories of other bottlers and distributors and grew Dublin Dr Pepper into a nice operation.  He died, and Jeff got greedy.  For a while, you could get Dublin Dr Pepper out of the fountains at Jason's Deli in Dallas County.  Jeff kept pushing and finally the people who own other distributorships got tired of Jeff blatantly disregarding his contractual agreements.

Jeff Kloster is not the "screwee" in this situation.

mac
mac

From the article it says that DPSG has the Dallas Territory.

That said, Dublin is about 60-70 miles west of it, allowing for a question about it.

Given that we have only heard the specific Dublin DP being shut down, this is a new development.

And worse Anony, this particular beverage - Big Red? - DPSG doesn't even have FULL rights to it, so I feel that they're stepping on some toes. It's why I say to people upset with this decision to contact the Austin Big Red factory and tell them that they're boycotting Big Red as long as DPSG keeps Dublin from producing it.

mac
mac

Scotts, you're missing the point - DPSG was already violating the territory issue by selling the cans and even more a plastic bottled version with the DUBLIN colorings outside the 6 county territory.

They also APPROVED a website to the Dublin website, where you could purchase the beverage. This has been going on for 10 years, so it's not a surprise to anyone - well anyone who really has drunk the beverage.

Oh, and Dublin did not have any of the bottles outside that territory. That said, Imperial Pure Cane Sugar drinks were being sold outside the territory prior to this suit, and clearly NOT done by DPSG.

So, NO Scott, they did NOT violate their territory. If anything DPSG could be at fault.

Like I said though - in the end, DPSG instead of working with Dublin to expand the product - maybe even just having it where only bottled versions of the drink carried the Dublin moniker if bottled in Dublin - they just shut it and now Big Red down.

And all for $5 million more in an - at least at the time - $6.5 BILLION dollar industry (which as I'm seeing now is falling deeper and deeper with these bad choices.)

A-nony-mouse
A-nony-mouse

The Dublin Bottling Works had a contract with DPSG that allowed distribution only in a 6 county area. That contract is now gone, so the Dublin Bottling Works can distribute wherever it wants, as long as it's other product contracts don't also have a set distribution area. So the question is: Does Big Red have contractually set distribution areas with Dublin Bottling Works or is DPSG putting pressure on Big Red to freeze out Dublin Bottling Works?

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