Calatrava Bridge: Just a Cheap, Pretty Bauble Hiding an Old, Ugly Scheme to Steal Our Park

Categories: Schutze

SHZ_GetOffMyLawn_TitleImageV2.jpg
In all of the hoopla over the impending opening of the new Calatrava bridge over the Trinity River, please remember what that bridge really stands for and why it's there. It stands for the ruination of what could have been the world's greatest urban park.

Remember that in the run-up to the 2007 referendum on putting an expressway out there in the middle of the park, some of the private donors to the bridge project threatened to demand their money back if voters rejected the in-the-park alignment for the road.

That's what this is all about. The toll road. Never forget that.

LitUpCalatrava.JPG
Photo by Unfair Park Editor, taken last night while thinking how much Schutze would like it
The toll road hasn't been built yet, but it could be, and the threat it poses to the park is still very much with us. And please remember why Dallas voters approved the in-the-park alignment in 2007 -- because then Dallas Mayor Tom Leppert told the voters bold lies about the safety, financing and functionality of the road.

If we had had a mayor who told us the truth at the time, that thing would have gone down in flames.

The Calatrava bridge has always been a bread-and-circuses trick to keep the public from focusing on what the road advocates want to do to their park: kill it.

In 1998, when voters approved the Trinity River project, it was described to them as the biggest urban park in the world, a wonderful green space that would connect the far ends of a divided city. Only after the votes had been counted did City Hall reveal the true nature of what voters had been sold.

Far from a park project, it was a highway-building project to facilitate redevelopment of the aging Stemmons industrial corridor as a suburban gated community on steroids, a high-rise version of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, with its own private ingress and egress, a big fat roaring toll road that would also serve as a big fat barrier to protect the new district from the masses living nearby.

That's the biggest joke of all -- that the real estate development behind the road project is the hopelessly obsolete Eisenhower-era pipe dream of people who no longer have even an inkling of what modern downtowns are all about, how they work and who wants to live in them or why.

In the process, if it is ever built the toll road will savage the park idea, walling off downtown from the park, rendering the entire middle section of the park utterly inhospitable and wrecking forever the idea of an endless band of grass and forest to bind the city together.

While cities the world over are spending billions to tear down exactly this kind of jailhouse wall and liberate their green spaces from concrete and car exhaust, the people behind the toll road idea want to take Dallas by the scruff of the neck and drag it back to the 1950s.

That's what that bridge represents. The Calatrava bridge is a sucker's game, the string of pearls an errant husband brings home when he fears he's about to get caught misbehaving. Architecturally it's an obscenity, a suspension bridge where there is nothing over which to suspend, a bauble, a cheaped-down version of the original design, Calatrava's own knock-off of himself, a larger version of that white-water thing the same people built in the river and then had to close immediately because it was so poorly executed.

The Calatrava bridge represents everything wrong and cheesy that people want to do to our river -- people with bad taste and a stubbornly anachronistic worldview.

I'm not saying don't go listen to the bands. Listen to the bands. The stuff on the other side of the bridge on opening night, in West Dallas, will be cool. Those are other people doing that.

I'm just asking you not to forget what the bridge itself represents. It's the fancy silver cap on a crystal vial. Of strychnine.

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Dm_Stm
Dm_Stm

Yeah it is a shame.  Everytime I see this bridge I get sick. Talk about your bridge to nowhere and over nowhere (that is the Trinity drainage ditch).  The one project that could have brought a little more beauty to a city that is in desperate need of some and that lacks any real beauty elsewhere is virtually trashed.  The city of Dallas is a joke in the eyes of almost every other major city.

Tiprey
Tiprey

great now the indigents from uptown and downtown will flock to West Dallas, all because the followed a shitty looking new bridge.

Thanks

Idiotboxx
Idiotboxx

Wrong.   Do I want an effin tollway in the middle of my park?. No.  Do I love Calatrava's bridge...yes.  Dallas was going to have to rebuild that bridge and the others... It was inevitable.  Mine as well make it look badass and now the Federal gov't is paying the bills on the other two bridges that INEVITABLY will need to be rebuilt anyways.  So don't sit here and say building the Calatrava bridges was a bad idea.  Whether it was Calatrava or another architect....the bridges were going to have to be re-built just like every other bridge in major cities around the country.  I'm sure you've seen the research that  TFA found that nearly 70,000 American bridges were “structurally deficient,” which means that they need major repair or replacement. This is nearly 12% of all the bridges in the country.  Dallas' bridges were getting to that point.  Once the other two bridges are built and you see the unity of the architecture of the three bridges against the backdrop of the Dallas night skyline....you wil see how incredible they will look.  I love reading your stuff JIm.....but to call the bridge bad taste in architecture basically reminds my why you write (you're fantastic at it).  But you fail miserably when it comes to critiquing architectural design.

IMHO
IMHO

Yeah I remember the original Calatrava bridge design, and was particularly disappointed with this accepted downgrade version.

I dunno.... I guess as with most things, ya get what ya pay for. Sometimes it simply doesn't pay to be too cheap. Sometimes is just better to shop with "coupons" as opposed to buying the bargain brand in order to save a few cents.

As much as I hate to admit it, sometimes ya gotta con the (tax paying) populace into accepting a purchase that has bigger, more longterm implications of and for itself. Sometimes I feel that the citizens and denizens of the Dallas area are way too simple- and lazy-minded; shortsighted in gist. West Dallas needs (and deserves) to be re-cultivated and re-invigorated; in essence: "re-built". I mean, why not?? To listen to some folks about the matter, Dallas may as well stand pat on EVERY potential new development plan. Why should the nation's 9th largest city (part of the 4th largest metro) just sit idle in regards to expansion and city-scape development- unless it really believes that it's reached the pinnacle of it's own sense of grandeur and achievement. I completely understand the desire to be fiscally responsible and to not spend recklessly where it isn't due, but when you're sitting on as much potential as Dallas is, it behooves the "visionary minds" to try to get things done- and, in some cases, by almost ANY means necessary. City-for-city, Houston kicks Dallas' ass (with regard to urban planning/development) for all of the WRONG reasons (-yes, I realize that the zoning laws are different ::sigh::). Dallas should be right there- if not, exceedingly, but everybody pretends that every idea is too challenging, too expensive, and/or too unnecessary.

So yeah, certain projects get "sold" under a sorta "bait-n-switch" guise. How else do ya, otherwise, get projects off of the ground when you already know that being completely forthcoming is gonna prevent ANYTHING from happening??

The Royal Wii
The Royal Wii

I've heard the old saying: Like a turd in a punchbowl.

This is like a punchbowl in a turd.

Oak Cliff Clavin
Oak Cliff Clavin

Someone's not getting invited to the Hunt's Bridge-a-palooza after-party.

and I hear the prostitutes at those are world-class.

Scarlet Dallas
Scarlet Dallas

I don't have a problem with a signature bridge per se. My problem is that there is absolutely no demonstrated transportation need for this bridge at all. The I-30 and I-35 bridges are falling apart and we wait on them so we can build this bridge to nowhere. Why? The never ending civic goal of "redevelopment." This city engages in more social engineering efforts than Stalin did. Newsflash: every city has bad neighborhoods. It is an inevitable fact of life. Until we live in proleterian dream utopia of income equity, places like West Dallas will exist. The reality is that we have built a beautiful bridge to connect downtown to promised land of salvage yards, tote the note dealerships and a superfund site. Sleep tight Dallas, I am certain that beautiful new streetscaped avenues with fountains, art galleries and food trucks await on Singleton.

Bmarvel
Bmarvel

Jim,I know it's a stretch, especially when it's so much fun to take a swipe at this here avant-garde architecture stuff.  (I mean who's going to gainsay you, art being in the eye of the beholder and all that?) But it would really be worth the effort to separate your on-target criticisms of the whole Trinity River Toll Roadeo fiasco from your passing attempts to write cogent art criticism, which read like every dime-and-spare-change journalist's cheap shot at modern art.I won't bother to correct your notion of what the bridge is as a piece of urban design, except to note that if you still imagine it is a "suspension bridge" then you haven't been paying attention to architecture and design for the past three decades. No matter. The bridge is up. It's not the first piece of urban design put up to cover a dubious enterprise with razzle-dazzle, and it won't be the last. Art and architecture have a way of outliving bad intentions. (The Parthenon was built with embezzled money.)  But the bridge a dazzling spectacle from almost any angle. The best view of it is going to be from the Oak Cliff side, with Dallas' skyline in the background. And looking back on your take in a few years is going to make Andy Rooney's weekly whines sound like deep wisdom.

      

Heavy Metal Church Lady
Heavy Metal Church Lady

I do agree that situations can be set up to encourage wanton, reckless attacks on modern art, and it's pretty easy to get people to play along. However, a careful study of Calatrava's other bridges in other places reveals that he has masterfully created works of modern art that are perfectly designed for the bodies of water and surrounding environments of specific locations. The one in Dallas in a repurposed design from Italy. If you look at the original, it is perfectly suited for the location.

As far as the view from Oak Cliff. What I see Bill, is a visual cacophony of cables. I see a giant hairpin that is pinched into an area that's too small for a bridge that elaborate, hence the height. But it had to go there so photographers could get on top of the levees when it floods and takes those pictures that shows 1) we have a river and, 2) the bridge is part of the signature skyline. If there's a lot of water, then you get the symmetrical reflection below. But we all know the fullness of the Trinity is an exception to the rule; it may be a commercial photographer's dream come true when it floods, but it's also a condition that makes people on this side of the levees nervous for obvious reasons. 

If you study the published photos of the Dallas version of the bridge in major media and promotional materials, photographers prefer the extreme angles because it doesn't compress space the way it does here in Oak Cliff--and as I said before, there's a lot of clutter to look through to see the bridge, and the bridge appears as clutter with all its cables. It's a tangled web on many levels.

I can't look at the bridge and not think of the questionable condition of the levees and the money from the Trinity River Corridor Project that is unaccounted for. The Calatrava bridge, the original, is appropriate to its location. This one is not, it is a compromise.

Bmarvel
Bmarvel

"The one in Dallas in a repurposed design from Italy."The Dallas Theater Center Turtle Creek building was originally designed for another site. When Wright was commissioned to create a theater for Dallas, he just dusted off some old blueprints. The result was beautiful, as architecture. (As theater, it never worked very well, but that would have been true wherever it was built.)"I can't look at the bridge and not think of the questionable condition of the levees"Viewed this way many architectural landmarks would fail. It seems to me in the long run the eyeball test is the only reliable guide to looking at art. Note: In the long run. How many workers lost their lives, arms, fingers, etc., building Chartres? How many generations before their families could appreciate the beauty of that masterpiece? Did the Spartans think of the Parthenon as a great temple, or as a gross misuse of their money? Can we look at Picasso's paintings of his various mistresses without thinking of his mistreatment of women?Esthetically, your arguments carry a little more water, though I disagree. Would the bridge look better if it spanned a broad river, or a bay or inlet? Perhaps. Ultimately, arguments that this or that structure would have looked better in other places, other circumstances, are unprovable. We'll see how the bridge wears in time.In the meantime, I notice that Jim failed to raise any of the esthetic issues you raised. That's because Jim is uninterested in esthetic issues. For him, the bridge is merely an opportunity to carp on the whole corridor project. Fine, but his writing is much more effective and targeted when he writes directly about that project. He is guilty of the same complaint he makes about the bridge: Misdirection.

Bmarvel
Bmarvel

Aptly-named Church Lady,You write "So, if people of our times want to balk about the status, stature, pretense, and aesthetics of a designer bridge while our most basic infrastructure deteriorates, I am all for it. Nobody has to be an expert to know our needs are not being met in ways that benefit people in very basic ways."Ah, If we would only stop making all these fancy buildings, sculpture, bridges, monuments, and what have you, then we could eliminate poverty, cure cancer, stop wars. Folks would trip through grassy meadows wearing flowers in their hair, and the lion architect would lie down with the lambish social worker. This is, of course, the ancient Complaint Against Art, founded on a wobbly frame of false assumptions and forlorn hopes. It was probably muttered while workers were setting the foundation stone for Chartres.The building or bridge doesn't have to be a masterpiece -- and anyway we probably won't know whether or not it is for decades. It can be a roof-over freeway park, dazzling color display on the sides of a very mediocre hotel. The point is that every city needs its touches of dazzlement, which occasionally rise to the level of beauty. Especially a city as visually bereft as Dallas. I know this sounds insufficiently sympathetic to the poor and powerless -- how many South Dallas homes could be lighted with the electricity poured out on the Omni? But it's true. Unless you're content to watch the chickens peck in your back yard, we all need a bit of color and spectacle in our lives.  Say what you will, the bridge is pretty spectacular. I'll leave it to the argument of the eye.       

Heavy Metal Church Lady
Heavy Metal Church Lady

We will know the probable outcome of our actions because there will most likely be a record made and posted in the electronic ethers.

I gave no qualifying term that said such actions are noble, notable or otherwise. It just means there is a 99.99% chance they will be documented by self or bystander with a cell phone or other digital communicator. Not hubris, how it is.

If we choose reflection before or after an event, and even while its happening, I'm all for it. Most of us, however, do not.

Bmarvel
Bmarvel

"It's an information age, we know the probable outcomes of our actions"Hubris, pure hubris.

Heavy Metal Church Lady
Heavy Metal Church Lady

First, a FLW building is different than building a structure that is a bridge (unless it's "Falling Water," a masterpiece). I'll say it again, if you look at Calatrava's other bridges, you'll see how artfully they address the environment they co-exist in. "Dusting off some old blueprints" in the case of Calatrava has advantages: namely, the production of the parts had been done elsewhere.

But by doing so, did it shortchange Calatrava on what he could have done? Unanswered questions so I'll move on. (But I'd be willing to wager Calatrava has agency in the form of building associates that get him these gigs in big cities and make a nice commission on the deal. That's another debate for another day.)

As far as pointing to other building projects that have become renowned in present day, our age is vastly different. It's an information age, we know the probable outcomes of our actions (the actions of politicos and art patrons). There will always be a permanent record of particles, high and low, swirling in the universe on the interwebs. Some plebe from the Middle Ages working on Chartres probably couldn't write his record of inequalities nor would they have been of import after all the credentialed experts though the eons parsed the exact stories they thought should be told over others. 

Also, there are big revolutions currently taking shaping in the fields of architecture and urban planning. Underlying it all is the notion of sustainability. We're in a post-Gehry world; even in the most rarified social circles people get that we've exploited resources to the point of perhaps no return. Building practical, non-hierarchical, functioning, energy-saving projects is what's on the horizon. (Samuel Mockbee, what a saint.)

You can see this attitude in the general populace, there has been several letters in the DMN about the light usage of the Omni etc. So, if people of our times want to balk about the status, stature, pretense, and aesthetics of a designer bridge while our most basic infrastructure deteriorates, I am all for it. Nobody has to be an expert to know our needs are not being met in ways that benefit people in very basic ways.

We can argue aesthetics, but the olden days of the the end justifies the means are changing--as is the idea that one super creator (Calatrava), with the backing of a few wealthy patrons, get the last word on the value of noble monuments.

Perry Moore
Perry Moore

You can't really blame Mr. Schutze for the literary lava that flows from his figurative pen on a regular basis. If I lived in the heart of the big city, I'd be boiling every day. I guess folks have to go where the jobs are. Can't wait to see that fine bridge and take in a Mavs game, though.

Bmarvel
Bmarvel

By the way, Church Lady,I have to add, in fairness to Jim, that when he writes about, say, canoe trips in the wilderness his better nature kicks in. His senses are sharper, his writing sings, and the link between his perceptions and his politics are never forced, never cheap.   

VivlianWozz
VivlianWozz

I am a 27 years old doctor,mature and beautiful. and now i am seeking a good man who can give me real love, so i got a sername Andromeda2002 on  Agedate.СòM, a nice and free place for younger women and older men,or older women and younger men, to interact with each other.Maybe you wanna check out or tell your friends. 

VivlianWozz
VivlianWozz

I am a 27 years old doctor,mature and beautiful. and now i am seeking a good man who can give me real love, so i got a sername Andromeda2002 on  Agedate.СòM, a nice and free place for younger women and older men,or older women and younger men, to interact with each other.Maybe you wanna check out or tell your friends. 

JohnLiu
JohnLiu

I would also like to believe soon. But I've seen nothing done in one and a half years now. I'll be there soon, I'll bet nothing new. 

zach
zach

Well said Jim.

Guest
Guest

Just let the politicians do their thing, JimS. They know better than we do what makes a world class city. Sure they've apparently never delivered one, but they always know what the next piece we need on our never-ending road to get there.

I mean, there are BUCKETS of money out there to build this road and this park. And if we don't build the road, we'll never get Project Pegasus built. And we'll be sending $1 billion down the river without a tollroad. And what's so great about jobs anyway? During slavery everybody had a job. Where is the equity? Nothing gets built in South Dallas without giving some do-nothing consultants a wad of cash. And EVERY project in South Dallas has to have multiple studies done to determine whether it should be built. It's surely just a HUGE coincidence that the call for these additional studies on the Inland Port were called for right after the Inland Port guy refused to hire the proper consultants and give away the proper equity in his project.

NO ONE WILL COME TO DALLAS ANYMORE UNLESS THERE'S A HOTEL ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE CONVENTION CENTER. What do you mean have a private company built a hotel? We're Republicans, we know the government is the best organization to build and own private businesses. And pay no attention to the first consultant's study that said the hotel was going to lose an absolute shit-ton of money, we paid the same consultant some more money and they came up with different numbers somehow.

Theowlofflowers
Theowlofflowers

I'm appalled at the number of hateful comments I have read from Jim Schutze over the years. I am trying to move back to Big D, and the only major problem I have with Dallas is him. If he is so unhappy here, there are other, more provencial places he can go live where no one will bother to build beautiful art bridges. Narrow-minded is the term that comes to mind when I consider his many columns.

Darrd2010
Darrd2010

If Jim keeps you from moving to Dallas, so be it. We loves us some Jimbo.

Wes Scott
Wes Scott

Bye bye! We probably will not even realize that you didn't come back. Schutze is right on target about this whole mess, and I, for one, appreciate his perspective in bringing it to our attention. If citizens had been paying attention several years ago, then none of this crap would ever have happened. Our mayor and city manager intentionally and willfully lied to us in selling this project, aided and abetted by former Councilmen David Neumann, Ron Natinsky and others who had vested interests.

JimS
JimS

I have spoken to my people, and you will not be allowed to move back to Dallas. If you insult me or question my authority again, I will have you barred from additional cities.

Jon Daniel
Jon Daniel

" I am trying to move back to Big D"

From where?  Waco?

Daniel
Daniel

Fine, don't come back. Just "fly-fish in upstate New York" the rest of your life.

Wewewewewe
Wewewewewe

You sound like one of the consultants hired to shill for the bridge. Maybe one being investigated by the FBI?

cockadoodledoooo
cockadoodledoooo

If your only problem with Dallas is a, Mr.Jim Schutze, you might want to get check out(and checked out, I mean, your head) because why would you be for an artsy bridge, but not a critique of it??? Seems, strange and small minded, as if that's from whence you've crawled.

Gangy
Gangy

Sounds like something Tom Leppert would say.

trudat
trudat

...although I disagree with JS on a number of points, I appreciate the non lap-dog streak that seems to run down his back...the minute he starts sounding like the status quo is the minute I'll be reading some other journalist...he will think outside the box and that is a good thing...

Tunnels
Tunnels

So I'm looking at the bridge, and looking at the water, and tying to figure out if the new road is going to tunnel under the bridge, or go over it.  Anyone?

DaTruth
DaTruth

I am sure the proposed alignment of the toll road will have it traveling through the bridge suspension cables. If we do not do that, then South Dallas will drown. Right?

LogiRush
LogiRush

Schutze, you've sunk to a new low for idiocy. We have a beautiful new bridge which stands independent of the toll road - the bridge does not make the toll road more viable or more likely to happen. The bridge will promote redevelopment of west Dallas and the old Continental bridge will become a pedestrian bridge. Is redevelopment of west Dallas an Eisenhower-era idea? I don't think so.You really are an old curmudgeon. Retire like Andy Rooney and go have some routine surgery.

Darrd2010
Darrd2010

Awwww, Mayor Mike, don't be so tough on Jim. Getting a little warm for ya?

Paul
Paul

So we were sold this bill of goods as a means to increase road access into West Dallas from the CBD and now we are shutting down the Continental Bridge.

How does this increase access to West Dallas?

Calatrava is a con artist from the same mold as IM Pei.

lorlee
lorlee

not necessarily independent -- if the tollroad were to go in, since this is a floodway, you cannot compromise the flood flow.  So in order to maintain the flow, you would have to dig the channel deeper and wider which increases the velocity which undermines piers on a regular bridge-- therefore you needed this suspension bridge.  Sort of like the high bridges over 45 south of town where in anticipation of the ill-conceived barge canal, one of the previous stupid ideas for the river.  Just leave it alone already.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin

how does a bridge promote redevelopement, just curious, I mean, its not like you couldnt take any of 3 other bridsges already there to to get to west dallas.  Its not like this is the first time people will be able to cross the trinity  to west dallas. 

Fred
Fred

Have you ever been to Sausilito? Granted, it's prettier than West Dallas but a good deal of the money it makes is from people driving over the Golden Gate bridge to have lunch on the other side.  I'm thinking the Belmont will cash in!

Wes Scott
Wes Scott

10-4, Scotts! Anybody who wants to get to West Dallas can do so via many thoroughfares. The real question is why would anybody want to get to West Dallas? Eventually, real estate developers will drive down property values and buy up all the adjacent land around the river for an "urban development" project that will sell at rates far above those paid for the land by the developers, who will make out like bandits.

Those displaced by the sale of their land to the developers will not get enough money to find suitable housing elsewhere, and thus will be displaced. That's the name of the game. But, until West Dallas is re-developed into something attractive there is no magnet for the new bridge to attract people into West Dallas. More than likely, it will serve as yet another way for indigents from West Dallas to migtrate into downtown Dallas.

The toll road will never be built (USACE will never approve a road between the levies.) The park will probably never be built. The city wasted $4.2 million building a whitewater park that cannot even be opened because it was built too dangerously and is already silting in before it ever gets used. This whole Trinity River Project was a fiasco designed to make a few developers and politicians more wealthy than they already were without ever producing any final results. Former Mayor Leppert and City Manager Suhm should be tried for fraud, convicted and sent to prison for the charade they foisted upon taxpayers in Dallas.

JimS
JimS

So how does this work? The bridge is such a powerful draw that it just sucks all the juice out of Uptown? You sound to me like some guy who bet his kids' college fund on too many warehouses.

rivergeek
rivergeek

A park does not (maybe should not) need to be developed for it to be great. To compare the Great Trinity Forest to anything else, until you have hiked the Buckeye Trail (trailhead at end of Bexar St.) in early-mid March, you really don't know what you're talking about.

Daniel
Daniel

They should rename it the World-Class Trinity Forest. When they named it the "Great" Trinity Forest (or the Richards Group or whoever did), I think they undersold it.

Also, "Uptown." To be an authentic, world-class city, we should have rechristened that portion of Oak Lawn "Uppermosttown." I mean, think about it.

cockadoodledoooo
cockadoodledoooo

The only problem that I can see with the new bridge is that i'm just not quite yet drunk enough to appreciate it, that's all.  

Jgreenan
Jgreenan

Get a divorce, but keep the damn pearls. As a gift, they aren't even community property.

So I'm for keeping the bridge, whatever else happens.

Parisrec
Parisrec

I've been around the big D real estate scene for awhile now and I can tell you it's dirty as hell. There's always a back-room deal in play. Plus, the Dallas Morning News is used as a platform to smear anyone who doesn't roll over. Beware the " PUBLIC-PRIVATE " partnership lie. It's outrageous that the taxpayers have to bankroll any of these land-grabs. The private group uses the city to blow out the "small potatoes " and then polishes their halo. If we really want to make this city better, I suggest that public monies be used for better roads and Better Schools. These ugly " landmarks " can't cover up obscenely overcrowded classrooms. We need to Triple our classroom teacher corps. Funny how there always seems to be money for some Named building while many public schools in town look like a portable trailer park.

JimS
JimS

Scruffy and Monte: but don;t think in terms of other parks, at least not American ones. Cities around the world are creating wonderful linear parks by restoring rivers. Wildlife comes right up that path into the center of the city. It's wilderness cheek by jowl with highrises. We could do that kind of thing, but not with a big honking freeway cutting it in half. Sure, you can still like the bridge. You can. I can't. Because I know what it stands for. But you can. Go ahead. I used to like Lucky Strikes. Great cigarettes, as cigarettes go. But, you know, damn.

lorlee
lorlee

That wildlife already does -- White Rock Creek is a few blocks from my house and last week we had a mother coyote (shot by the police) who were more responsive to this than the 2 legged coyotes who plague the neighborhood.  Also possums and racoons. 

Scruffygeist
Scruffygeist

Giving Susan Boyle a makeover isn't going to make her Heidi Klum.

Granted, it's much better if you do and there's tons of potential, but the Trinity isn't the Rhine either. The effort should be made, but the city should temper any expectations that doing it will get them mentioned in the same breath as urban parks in more scenic or fertile parts of the world.

Observist
Observist

Here's a nice one - the Torrens River Park in Adelaide, Australia:

http://www.trekearth.com/galle...

They call it the "Hills to Sea" park...  Oh.  Wait.  Dallas doesn't have hills.  Or sea.  ..but I'm sure Dallas's Hills-to-Sea Park will be just as nice without hills or sea.

http://www.google.com/imgres?u...

Paul
Paul

We could put some in with bond money to go along with the stretch of rapids ...

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