90 Miles An Hour Down a Dead End Street: Bike Lanes, Road Humps and Costs Per Linear Miles

ExpeditedBikeProjects.JPG
From the PowerPoint prepared for this afternoon's Bike Plan briefing
One week ago this morning we were writing about Israel "Dallas" Torres's over-the-weekend accident on the Jefferson Boulevard Viaduct, where a motorist sent the veteran cyclist to intensive car. As Jason Roberts noted then, and as the council's Transportation and Environment Committee will be reminded again at 1 today, the Jefferson Viaduct is high on the list of projects marked "Expedited Bike Plan Implementation"; matter of fact, per today's second go at a Dallas Bike Plan Implementation briefing, it's one of the few restriping projects for which there is no "funding gap." None whatsoever.

Which, per the briefing, is not the case elsewhere: There are 327 miles of streets scheduled to be restriped between March and September, 183 miles of which overlap with the bike plan's recommended routes. But the city once again will say there's no money ("Additional cost for 183 miles of bike facility striping is $3.9 million), no cost savings from striping bike facilities simultaneously with standard lanes," and no need for these particular lanes besides, not right now ("The majority of restriping project overlaps with Bike Plan routes would not provide strategic connections to the bike network at this time"). Which reminds me: According to the city, it costs on average $1,690 per mile to restripe a Dallas street. That's from today's Pavement Markings briefing, which immediately precedes Bike Plan talk.

And, don't forget: To implement the bike plans, there still need to be those pesky thoroughfare amendments.

Speaking of which: According to today's briefing, there 16 "time-sensitive Thoroughfare Plan amendments" waiting to be processed, each of which will be handled by a single overburdened city staffer. And to implement the Bike Plan, there will be more amendments needed ... then more on top of that. Which is why council will be told this afternoon that perhaps the city's bicycle planner, Max Kalhammer, may need to have his job and resources "re-aligned to focus on Bike Plan related Thoroughfare Plan amendments." But they're trying, goshdangit, they're trying.

And speaking of thoroughfares: During the same briefing council will also discuss ways to manage neighborhood traffic, a very related subject. So in case you were wondering how one goes about getting some residential-parking-only restrictions, say, this briefing's for you.

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8 comments
Paul S.
Paul S.

Heard a bit on NPR last night that mentioned that Mexico City has bike lanes.  Does that make them more "world class" than us.  I think I will change my handle to "World Class Clown"

Jon Daniel
Jon Daniel

Why is this so hard to understand? Prioritizing usage of city funds is based on the ROI to real estate developers and other Dallas Citizen Association members, or the old school South Dallas political appeasement machine.   This is why we get an ultra expensive deck park instead of 10 great smaller parks which do not abut to prime commercial real estate. This is why there is "no money". Unless there is a real estate development play, nothing will get done. This is why we don't have a Trinity River Park. This is why we have a Convention Center hotel and a lovely expensive bridge, while the streets are a wreck and the schools suck. 

Oak Cliff Townie
Oak Cliff Townie

Bike people have you ever thought of having a central point and working out from it ? Or even given a second thought where something ends ?

I mean how much more would it cost to run the WEST DAVIS route on out to Loop 12 rather than stop the bike lanes at an intersection on a hill ?  Is there a Woodlands Bike culture that is going to Hop on or exit the Bike lanes there ?Davis St through Arcadia Park is a congested area with stop lights and side streets . That seems like a good place to continue the lanes .And a bike lane going up that steep hill. Which would mean not having to worry about a car up the rear WOW what a CONCEPT ?I understand the JOY of finally getting something from the city is over whelming to you .But to an admitted outsider in the bike world It sure doesn't look like much

Good luck .

Tim Covington
Tim Covington

It sounds like they are trying to avoid doing the actual striping for the bike lanes. I can not understand how there are no cost savings doing the bike lane striping while they are restriping the street anyways. Unless, they aren't really planning on putting in the bike lanes?

heyheymama
heyheymama

Visiting the family in FL for Xmas, saw that our small town of Titusville had re-striped roads for bike lanes.  Just hung my head in defeat.  How can this small town that's struggled to grow for decades, despite being home to the Kennedy Space Center, and is now hit by job losses tied to the  KSC, manage to add bike lanes...and Dallas "the we-want-to-be-a-world-class-city" can't?

Richardson has them in my friend's neighborhood of Waterview and likely elsewhere.My sister's suburb of Atlanta has them.

Brenda Marks
Brenda Marks

Tim, I agree.  That just sounds crazy.  I'm willing to bet this work is contracted out (just like the pothole fills are contracted out).  Are they really saying that staff can't be bothered with a combined RFP that incorporates cost savings?  (In other words, they really aren't interested in putting in bike lanes, just looking like they are interested in putting in bike lanes.) 

Gabe
Gabe

Richardson has more bike lanes than Dallas. 

Dnews2007
Dnews2007

Those exact reasons you mention above probably keep the traffic counts low on those streets, so it wouldn't be a safety concern to take away a vehicle lane and add a bike lane. 

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