A Tree Grows in the Deck Park

Categories: Park and Rec
TreeontheDeckPark.JPG
Photo by Willis Winters
Yesterday the Woodall Rodgers Park Foundation sent word: The deck park would be receiving its first trees this morning, at 'round 10:30. I was told that despite the cold temperatures, the timing was good: "This season is the preferred time to plant because leaves are gone so the trees will not be stressed to provide nourishment to the leaves and can focus on the trunk and the branches."

This one is a River Birch from Hawkinsville, Georgia, planted at exactly 11:22 a.m., courtesy the watch of Park and Rec's second-in-command Willis Winters. It was among two dozen donated trees planted today. But this one, this is the very first.

Update: For those with some questions, the Park Foundation's official release follows, and it contains a few answers.
First Trees Planted at The Park
The Woodall Rodgers Park Foundation Announces Tree Trust

DALLAS (Dec. 06, 2011) - The Woodall Rodgers Park Foundation welcomed the first 25 of 322 trees to be planted in The Park with the announcement of a new program, the Tree Trust. Contractors began planting the grove of River Birch trees, generously endowed by the TurningPoint Foundation, in the future site of the Children's Park on Tuesday morning.

"The Park is literally coming to life with the arrival of our first trees," said Linda Owen, president of The Woodall Rodgers Park Foundation. "It becomes a three-dimensional project that signals just how close we are to finishing this outdoor community center in the heart of downtown Dallas."

The Tree Trust provides an opportunity for donors to make possible a tree or a grove in The Park at the $25,000 level and above. Tree Trust donors can select from six different species. Along with the River Birches endowed by the TurningPoint Foundation, Piper and Mike Wyatt have endowed two trees, a Pond Cypress in honor of Bruce Calder and a Red Oak, the past Stemmons Service Award recipients have endowed a tree, and another Red Oak has been endowed by Gaedeke Group.

Sustainability is key to The Park's landscaping plan, designed by the Office of James Burnett. The tree species -- Texas-native Shumard's Red Oak, Bur Oak, Pond Cypress, River Birch, Pistache and Lacebark Elm -- were selected specifically for their durability and have been cultivated for the city climate. Landscaping will also include 32 native Texas species out of 37 total plant species.

Trees in The Park will be planted in trenches designed to support their weight while ensuring they are able to reach maximum growth. At maturity, the trees will sequester an estimated seven tons of carbon per year.

All landscaping in The Park will be maintained using a high-efficiency irrigation system which limits water lost to overspray and evaporation, saving approximately 350,000 gallons of water each year.

My Voice Nation Help
26 comments
Sort: Newest | Oldest
Scott Vann
Scott Vann

Hope they do better keeping these plants alive than the ones at the 75/Mockingbird intersection.

Grumpy Demo
Grumpy Demo

Hope they have a few left over and can use the surplus to replace a few of the hundreds of dead trees that make up the dead landscaping along Central Expressway.

After driving past miles of dead trees and shrubs it will be real impressive to see this wonder garden.

Pretty Perry
Pretty Perry

Texas River Birch is native to Texas, growing along river banks in moist soils.  Rapid grower (one reason to plant in the park to maximize size in a short time although this can be problematic as they can be short lived) and are susceptible to ice damage.

shrubstex
shrubstex

It is so much fun re-charging my sarcasm arsenal from the comments section. I will say that using Texas Natives is a good idea, but maybe the term adapted migrants would work better, since we Anglos are adapted migrants. I think it would be fun to hang out with you all some time too. 

Juan Valdez
Juan Valdez

I just love how contradictory Dallas is...an prefab park with non native trees on top of a highway, YES!!!!  A natural park with native grasses, shrubs and trees, next to an existing river, HELL NO!!!!Dallas baffles me. It saddens me that people do not have common sense in this city. I like the "concept" of this park dont get me wrong. But the Trinity River park makes more sense than this atrocity. I pitty those trees. They will bake this summer and I will see them as they broil from my office. :(

RTGolden
RTGolden

How exactly are they 'saving' 350,000 gallons of water?  If they didn't build an idiotic park over an expressway they wouldn't have to plant all those trees, then they wouldn't need any extra water for that area.  This is the same logic used by people who buy something they don't need, just because it's on sale, thus 'saving' them money.

ObserverFan
ObserverFan

I can't wait for the park to be finished so the millionaires living in (soon to be finished) Museum Tower have something to look at when they stare out the window.

camarillobrillo
camarillobrillo

I'll make sure and wear my ass-less chaps, when i'm lying around, out there!

Augie
Augie

There are many better tree choices that this one that barely ranges into the edge of the piney woods.  That ain't a bridge in Downtown Dallas.  I guess it doesn't matter...once these die, native trees can be planted. 

Doug
Doug

God I hate to be a cynical old bastard (but I am), but I figure the trees start dying in 3..2..1..

fred
fred

Bitch Bitch Bitch...

camarillobrillo
camarillobrillo

It really sucks that people can't keep their opinions to themselves, right?

John_McKee
John_McKee

Any word on what is going on with the crazy lighting situation in the tunnel?

NativeTexasWood
NativeTexasWood

What the heck would be wrong with planting some Texas trees in a Texas park?Does Dallas have to import everything? This town has an identity crisis.

Grumpy Demo
Grumpy Demo

Well there is that little fact this "park" cost millions of dollars, while the City ignores and abandons it's other parks along with the landscape dead zone along Central.

Rich people get a pretty park, the rest of us get dead plants, weeds, and peeling paint.

Matt H
Matt H

From the federal website on how to grow trees, looks like they could have picked a better tree for a park in the middle of downtown Dallas that will be subjected to pretty intense heat:

In the forest, birch trees thrive on cool, moist soils. Their very shallow root system makes them sensitive to even short periods of drought or heating of the soil, thus they grow poorly on hot, dry soils.

Downtown Resident
Downtown Resident

Maybe they picked Birches because of the shallow root system and the trade off to having to constantly water them offsets worrying about the roots of other trees from burrowing too deep and screwing with the superstructure? (just speculation, I don't know jack about trees)

Guest
Guest

So a parks department that can't afford to turn on the designed water feature at the other nice new park is going to water the shit out of those trees?

Hummmmmmdinger
Hummmmmmdinger

And one can guarantee that even if the City of Dallas runs low on water during the drought they'll be watering the hell out of that piece of land to keep that extension of the Arts District looking fab at all times...ugh.

Daily Reader
Daily Reader

What's in all of the white bags in the background?

Buckeye
Buckeye

And why are there two coffins in the foreground?  What's going on here?

NotTheSuburbs
NotTheSuburbs

Pretty sure it's styrofoam that they used to fill up the areas of the tree channels where there aren't any trees.  They need to keep the weight down and are also using lightweight dirt.

Daily Reader
Daily Reader

I'd say they were just the beginnings of the crypts that are complete in the background.

ScottsMerkin
ScottsMerkin

thats where they are storing all things related to JWP,  trying to bury it in the park where no one will find them until the 100 year flood comes, destroys our levees floods downtown, and coffins begin to float down Woodall

Downtown_worker
Downtown_worker

Good thing the canyon will keep the park and the Arts District above water. When Woodall Rodgers becomes a river, we will have our own San Antonio-style Riverwalk.

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

General

Loading...