Dallas ISD Looks to Close 11 Campuses Next School Year, Hopes to Save $11.5 Million

bonham_6x4_300.jpg
The DISD will look to consolidate, or close, the exemplary-rated James Bonham Elementary next school year.
As we mentioned Monday, the Dallas ISD trustees just got through discussing a very touchy subject: school consolidations and the repurposing of facilities -- or closures, for those who aren't sensitive to the subject matter. In all, DISD higher-ups are recommending shuttering 11 schools, nine elementary campuses and two middle schools, come the start of next school year. Following the meeting of the trustees' ad hoc committee, the district posted to its website a School Consolidations website, where you will also find the preliminary demographic study presented moments ago.

You will note that among those recommended for closure is one of the district's most celebrated campuses: James Bonham Elementary School, rated exemplary and a 2010 Blue Ribbon award winner. Expect principal Sandra Fernandez to be in high demand elsewhere in the district, if Bonham is indeed closed down and its students are sent to Robert E. Lee and Ben Milam, as proposed.

According to the presentation, the overall costs savings for the district would be $11.5 million -- no small amount, considering what's coming.

"This makes sense financially, but you really have to consider these when the district is facing another $38 million decrease in state funding, and we already cut nearly $80 million this current year," district spokesman Jon Dahlander tells Unfair Park. "You're going to have to make some real cost reductions some place, and this appears to save approximately $11.5 million."

According to Pat Guseman of Population and Survey Analysts, demographers employed by the district who gave the presentation to the ad hoc committee, DISD has lost 1,600 students between 2006 and the start of the 2011 school year -- in large part because of "apartments being town down." (Interestingly, PASA's website shows DISD as having lost 4,206 students between 2005-'06 and 2010-'11, while district figures show a rather level enrollment in recent years.) And no matter how much multifamily housing is built between now and whenever, she said, they ain't coming back in the foreseeable future. (By the way, look at those Frisco ISD enrollment numbers -- absolutely staggering when compared to the other districts in the area.)

"Remarkably the charter schools have been fairly stable in more recent years and have around 13,500 students," Guseman said. "Private schools that have DISD-enrolled students have around 18,700. These are students from within DISD boundaries, which represents 17 percent of total student population." And, she says, charters and private schools are expecting further growth: By 2015, the trustees were told, they expect to have 20,000 kids in charter schools and another 20,000 in private schools.

Some of the schools recommended for closure are under capacity; City Park, for instance, holds 414 students, but its fall 2011 enrollment is at 214, while D.A. Hulcy Middle School on S. Polk has 555 students attending a campus build to hold more than 1,200. But Arlington Park is actually over capacity -- which is why PASA is recommending its students be sent to Onesimo Hernandez and Maple Lawn, where enrollment is half of capacity.

But keep in mind: Just because a school's closed doesn't mean it can't be reopened. In 1981, for instance, six schools were shuttered: Nathan Adams, Dealey, DeGolyer, Kramer, Withers and T.C. Hassell -- five of which have since been reopened. And in '82, Hexter and Hotchkiss were mothballed, only to be resurrected as neighborhood needs demanded their reopening. As the demographers told the committee: The campuses would be "idled and vacated so the facilities would be available."

That, of course, will do nothing to calm the nerves of the principals, students, staff and parents of students at the 11 schools that stand to be affected by today's suggestions, which will go before the full board next month on the way to public hearings in advance of a final vote in January.

"We're also going to be opening up new schools in the next year, so staff will have opportunities to go to new schools or follow kids to other campuses," Dahlander says. "That's important too: The principals, teachers and staff will have an opportunity to apply for positions at campuses where students will be transferred. As Interim Superintendent Alan King says, just because a school's population has declined over time does not mean these educators are not valuable to us. They are."

A release from the district concerning school consolidations was just sent out. It's below.
AD HOC COMMITTEE RECEIVES RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SCHOOL CONSOLIDATIONS

Estimated Savings of $11.5 Million; Trustees to Consider in January

DALLAS-An ad hoc committee of the Board of Trustees received a recommendation today that eleven schools, including 9 elementary schools and 2 middle schools, be considered for consolidation with other campuses beginning next school year as a cost-saving measure.

After receiving $63 million less from the state during the current school year and cutting nearly $80 million, Dallas ISD is facing another $38 million decrease in state funding during the 2012-13 school year as a result of cuts to public education by the Texas Legislature.

In accordance with established district policy, the schools recommended for consolidation with others are predominantly campuses that are significantly underutilized, have low enrollment or are in close proximity to other campuses with available student capacity.

The overall cost savings are estimated at approximately $11.5 million.

"This past spring, the citizens budget review commission recommended to the board and the administration that the district examine the possibility of consolidating campuses with others to save money," said Interim Superintendent of Schools and Chief Financial Officer Alan King. "This is just the first step in that process. There will be public hearings followed by a scheduled vote of the board in January that will include numerous attendance boundary changes."

The schools recommended for consolidation with other campuses include: City Park Elementary School; Julia C. Frazier Elementary School; Phillis Wheatley Elementary School; N.W. Harllee Elementary School; Arlington Park Elementary School; James W. Fannin Elementary School; James B. Bonham Elementary School; Oran M. Roberts Elementary School; D.A. Hulcy Middle School; H.S. Thompson Elementary School; and, during the 2013-14 school year, Pearl C. Anderson Middle School.

A majority of the schools recommended for consolidation have less than 300 students. Seven of the eleven campuses recommended for consolidation with others are operating at less than 60% capacity. The $11.5 million in savings would be a result of having less administrative overhead, reduced utility costs, reduced maintenance and custodial costs and possibly fewer teachers.

Principals, teachers and staff at schools that are consolidated with others will have an opportunity to apply for positions at campuses where students will be transferred. They will also have the opportunity to apply for other available teaching positions within the district.

"Every effort will be made to provide other opportunities within the district for these teachers and other staff," said King. "Just because a school's population has declined over time does not mean that these educators are not valuable to us -- they are."

The recommendations to the Ad Hoc Committee of the Board of Trustees are the first step in a process that is defined by board policy. The board will discuss the recommendations in December and public hearings will be held in December and January. In order to get ready for the 2012-13 school year, a vote by the board of trustees on consolidating campuses and corresponding attendance zone changes will be scheduled for January.

"These recommendations are not made lightly. After last year's cuts of $80 million, there are simply few options available to make additional cost reductions that are significant," said King. "These are hard choices and they will not be popular, but shifting demographics and declining resources make them necessary. It should be noted that at least seven schools impacted in the past have re-opened as a result of changing demographic patterns. "

In the early 1980s, students attending several Dallas ISD schools with declining enrollment were transferred to other campuses. Those schools have long since been re-opened and are now thriving.
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Ms Fed up with DISD
Ms Fed up with DISD

This is just ridiculous.  I live right next door to the school where my kids attend. All I hear is saving money. Why dont the district employees stop taking the money..... Stop putting a price tag on or kids education.  DISD is so screwed up, and they wonder why our kids cant pass!!! Stop moving them around.....

Diane Birdwell
Diane Birdwell

These schools could be repurposed as alternative education centers for the chronically abusive, violent or perpetually failing students. Clear them from the masses of kids who actually are trying to learn, and everybody wins. These problem kids can get the help and attention they really need, and we get quieter campuses with increased achievement.

Educated Dad
Educated Dad

If I remember "Waiting for Superman" correctly, that would be the DOWN escalators.  Which teachers would be assigned to those schools?  Our best?  I understand that those students would be receive a separate education, but would it be equal?  I suspect the district would get in trouble for that one.

And who would evaluate those students to determin their track?  If they have a bad teacher (assuming those exist in Dallas ISD), what effect would that teacher have on their future and their eventual track?

Assuming we do not want "problem" students to be in the classroom (your argument, not mine), let's find a way to not allow them in the classroom.  Forcing them to go to an "alternative education center" just seems like a way for the district to receive state funding for their attendance with no expectation of really educating them.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Well, one thing that is for sure killing DISD is the presence of thugs and intentional non-learners on every campus.

Middle class parents hate it and leave.  Responsible lower income parents hate it, but have to stay. Teachers hate it.  The presence of these kids causes the whole system to go into 24/7 test prep mode to keep the state at bay.

And keeping these kids on the comprehensive campuses isn't helping them.  They need remediation and intense counseling.

Which teachers would go?It would depend on how the district decided to treat the teachers.-Give them special status, extra pay, exemption from CEIs, CPGs, and ACPs (anything district-written).-Assess the teachers using ITBS and peer review.  Nobody knows a bad teacher like a good teacher.-Resist the urge to show up in their rooms and nitpick them into perfection; be satisfied with a good effort regardless of whether they have 25 words on the word wall instead of 30.

As for separate but equal, we have alternative schools now.  If they aren't currently a legal issue, why would more of them be a legal issue?

And no child would be forced to go.  Pass your classes, obey school rules--you stay where you are.*And I would leave the elementary system as is.  I'm speaking only about secondary campuses.

YestoBonham
YestoBonham

I agree with you, DISD Teacher.  I live near Bonham in a nice little house, and I'm a single, white, well-educated, upper middle class woman who owns a great house in a cool part of town.  Like most people in my situation, if I end up having a child, I would likely move to University Park or pay for private school.  Why?  Because most of the schools near me are failing schools.  Would I ever send me kid to North Dallas High?  No way.  Would I consider sending my child to Bonham, though?  Probably.  It's an exemplary school, the community is behind it, and it's close by.  We'd have to go private or move in 4th grade, but I'd definitely give Bonham a try.

Cdespain
Cdespain

I have to agree with DISD Teacher.  The trustees spend most of their time trying to cover up surface level issues (like capacity) without getting to the root of the issues.

There are 5 schools in the Fair Park area that will be closed.  One of them is one of only two Exemplary schools in the neighborhood.  The fact that so many schools have operated so far below capacity for so long reveals severe neglect.  This is an entirely reactive move, and reactive decision making rarely yields positive results.  

   

Paul
Paul

We could save about $1 billion per year by shutting down DISD.  We could then restaff it from the ground up, more likely from the top down and have a significantly smaller budget.

StopDISD.org
StopDISD.org

Update ~ O.M. Roberts is on the list but, in today's DMN they confirms that DISD still plans to build a new Roberts Elementary to replace the old one.  WHAT???? That just doesn't make sense!!  You mean to tell me DISD is going to close O.M. Roberts but, will continue with plans to build a brand new 22 MILLION dollars school? 

So the district is saving 11 million to close these schools but, will spend 22 MILLION to build a new one?  

O.M. Roberts was under capacity so, the district is going to build an 800 student school?  How are they going to fill it up? 

 ....And then to turn around and close Eduardo Mata the fairly new school that's only 14 years old?  This is a WASTE!!  DISD STOP wasting OUR tax dollars!! 

Los_Politico
Los_Politico

You are aware that schools can be reopened, right? Wilonsky wrote it in his post and it's also in the press release.

Additionally, anyone who's ever worked with a budget knows that capital money and operational money are different outlays.

The district has future population projections they use to determine where to locate thier capital projects. Those projections still hold regardless of the temporary economic climate.

Joyce Foreman
Joyce Foreman

You are right, capitol money and operational money are from different funds, but new schools are built with capitol money but need operational dollars to open.  They have to be staffed, supplies have to be bought, furniture, etc. 

I agree with StopDISD.org.  They are playing a shell game with the public's money and need to be called out on that issue.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

A couple of thoughts:-Some trustees are very, very taken with what TFA and charter schools can do for them politically.  And mayors and city council members, too.  It's another version of taxpayer money being spent to benefit a very few (mayors, city council members, and school trustees).

Notice how TFA and charters are not in Highland Park.Let me repeat that:  Notice how the rich will not let their money be wasted on these fads.Should I repeat it?  If Highland Park doesn't want it, it probably ain't what it seems to be.

Highland Park parents get THE BEST MONEY CAN BUY for their children (and it doesn't hurt their property values, either).  

But are they buying TFA or charter schools?  They are not.Doesn't anybody but me wonder why that is?

-DISD's enrollment is indeed down, mostly bc the district is a race-based mess, filled with incompetent teachers, principals, administrators, and trustees.  Fix THAT problem, and enrollment (and property values) would rebound.  Fix THAT problem and DISD won't be a rotten district.

-Mark my words:  The closed campuses will be given to charter schools.  And the charter operators will take our tax dollars to pay themselves lavish, unregulated salaries.  The charter operators will return the favor by channeling tax dollars back to political campaigns.

scottindallas
scottindallas

if you're confused about this, you really have no business teaching anyone, anything.  Why don't you suggest DISD use HP's racial integration plan? You're trying to compare apples and pomegranates.

Anon
Anon

still, if the problem is rooted in demographics as you imply, using charters and TFA isn't really the way to solve the problem.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Actually, there's  only one problem:  HOW THE DISTRICT IS MANAGED.

HP: For the good of kids.DISD: For the good of a few adults with their hands out at the expense of the kids.

DISD kids are just as bright as any other kid.  If you believe differently, what can I say.

scottindallas
scottindallas

The problems are so different, it's silly to compare them.  HP is a tiny district and very well funded, racially homogenous with the majority of the parents living in the district for the district.  Dallas enjoys none of those factors.  I was just picking on one factor and showing how different the two are. 

D-mom
D-mom

TFA is a program designed to make a difference in disadvantaged schools. HPISD would hardly qualify.  How would any eager, talented, young college grad make a difference in Biff and Mindy's lives?  I think you need to quit teaching.  DISD has lots of problems inherent with any large urban district.  You are too bitter to make positive change in any child's life.  Please retire and give one of these TFA kids or  others graduating with degrees in education a chance for a career in teaching.   

Diane Birdwell
Diane Birdwell

Oh, I am sick of people knowing when a teacher should "quit teaching." How about not drinking the TFA Kool-aid?

DISD Teacher is spot-on. HPISD has students who are ready to learn on day one. Bingo. THAT is the difference. Their kids have problems, trust me, since I know  people who have taught there. TFA is needed as a temp agency, pure and simple, with the end result of training a cadre of 20-somethings as teaches long enough to give the illusion they know somethng and move them up to take over the very districts that are in trouble.... And divert their millions of dollars to edu-business. The way to destroy public education is to make it look like you are helping it.

DISD Teacher is not bitter, but factual. He/She does not need to retire to have as know-nothing TFA'er take their place.

Bill Holston
Bill Holston

that's not really fair. I don't think DISD teacher is bitter, just frustrated. Because not all the problems are inherent in a large urban school district. Yes, they are common but inevitable. That's why there are marvelous examples of DISD elementary schools, much depends on the principal at that school and involved parents.  

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

There would have to be safeguards in place to prevent "mob rule" by a minority of parents who like principals/teachers personally in spite of performance outcomes and/or the complaints of other parents.

No AU school should be stuck with an obviously incompetent principal simply bc 4 or 5 parents really like him/her and those parents are the ones who manage to dominate the conversation.

My actual goal is to get the middle class students of all races back into the district to create real diversity and an atmosphere of excellence.  

I'm trying to identify what it is that drives 99% of middle class parents away from DISD (and other urban districts) so that fixes can be made.  A big problem I see is that the district crams its corrupt and bureaucrat-serving schemes on the schools via personnel decisions, so giving the schools more real say-so might help.

I stand by my belief that unless we have trustees who seek the good of the kids above personal enrichment or political payback, nothing else will work.

Educated Dad
Educated Dad

You make an interesting argument.  So you believe parents and the local community should hire their own principal and teachers?  Would they then evaluate them (or just the principal) each year, or would that responsibility go back to the DISD staff that wasn't trusted to hire them?I wonder if this would lead to real cronyism and nepotism.

I'm not disagreeing with you, but I'm trying to understand your thought.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

I've seen this in DISD:Parents who are uncertain about a school feel better when they see parents who are "like" them--whether that is race, education level, economic level, or whatever--involved with the school and committed to it.

If DISD would turn principal and teacher hiring over to the PTAs at Hexter, Kramer, Stonewall, Withers, DeGolyer, Adams, Lakewood, Preston Hollow, and Pershing, those schools would become strong, stable powerhouses for the middle class.

Why those schools?  Because those schools are in higher middle class neighborhoods where parents usually choose private schools.

These powerhouse schools would change the middle schools and the high schools in the feeder pattern, which would benefit all the kids in the district.  Once proven, the method could be extended to all schools.

We have to get the middle class back in DISD.

Charters and privates take hiring decisions away from DISD--and that's a good thing.  That and the fact that they can permanently expel problem kids makes their performance seem better than it really is.

Give DISD schools a level playing field and parents will pick the all-American diversity-and-excellence public school every time.  

Educated Dad
Educated Dad

Whether charters, private school, suburban schools, or even expensive neighborhoods like Highland Park, would you say that parents tend to choose a school because of the perception of other parents at the school?

I think vouchers would encourage this.  I'm not saying it's right or wrong, but I agree that parental involvement and the perception of parental involvement are important.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Thank you, Bill.

I'm pretty sure D-mom is a shill for the charter schools.

I have zero problem with TFA except that they are expensive to taxpayers.  

Charters?  They are private schools that want to be funded with public money.If we're going to go down that road, just give vouchers so parents can at least choose the private school they want.

Charters are taxation without representation.

Guest
Guest

Highland Park teachers are far better than what the DISD has to offer, so you really have no point at all.  Here is a cheat sheet for you:

HP Teacher > TFA Teacher > DISD Teacher.

There isn't a single good urban school district in America.  The DISD won't break the mold anytime soon. 

Anon
Anon

no, they really aren't better teachers. you are confusing student outcomes with the quality of education they are receiving.

Educated Dad
Educated Dad

That's brings an interesting question.  How would you measure the quality of education a teacher provides?  How to you quantitatively measure teacher value?

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

HP's teachers come from the same colleges DISD teachers come from.

The difference is in who is running the schools and how competent they are to identify problems and solve them.

Also, HP doesn't have to keep problem teachers bc of race.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Or DISD gets teachers who graduated valedictorian from HS,  graduated with a degree in Math from UT, and decided they wanted to help the kids with few other advantages.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

If you're going to be a name-caller, maybe don't join the debate team.

DISD has fantastic teachers; ask Amy Severson about the teachers her children have had.DISD has some fantastic principals.

How dare you think that just because we take on the neediest of the needy and can't get them on-level 100% of the time, DISD teachers are somehow inferior.

DISD teachers are given high-need kids and rotten management and then we're told we suck.

Guest
Guest

Yes, but the HPISD gets it's pick of the litter and DISD gets the rest.  Very few teachers would choose to teach in the DISD if they could work in the HPISD.

Cliffhanger
Cliffhanger

I went to HP schools and my kids attend/attended schools in Plano and DISD.  Believe me, the ratio of good/bad teachers in the 'burbs and DISD is about the same based on my experience.  (Caveat--my kids were in magnets for high school, so I can really only speak to jr. high and grade school).

The big differences were involved parents, funding, overall community support and administration starting at the principals office.  Principals were there for decades.  They knew every teacher, they knew every kid and his/her siblings, they had the authority to run schools, etc.  DISD plays way to much musical chairs with principals IMHO, and of course everything from the principals office on up tends to be an unholy mess.

scottindallas
scottindallas

you're fucking stupid. To fit YOUR analogy, one might suggest Ford Motor Co. simply adopt the pricing standards of BMW and Mercedes, then; they'd fix all their problems.

Los_Politico
Los_Politico

Says a poster boy for the estate tax

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Los-You make DISD teachers proud.It is an honor to serve kids at the "lowly" comprehensives who have tremendous insight about how life really works.Many of my students' parents work the night shift at "lowly" jobs.  I respect those parents and I respect the kids who go home to empty apartments and do their homework on their own.  

You're exactly right about the teachers who choose the kids in DISD.

Los_Politico
Los_Politico

If you "couldn't afford a place in HPISD in two lifetimes" then how do you know of their teacher quality?

I, on the other hand, do know that I had both the state Calculus teacher of the year and the state Biology teacher of the year at a lowly comprehensive DISD high school a few years ago. Just to name 2 that are inarguable.

Most people who want to be teachers want to be able to do more than just babysit kids who dress up as gardeners for Halloween. They'd like to take the children of those made fun of gardners and give them the skills to move up in th world.

Guest
Guest

Nope.  Grew up poor at times, middle class at others (as do most of the middle class).  Paid my own way in college, and I couldn't afford a place in HPISD in two lifetimes.  I'm just saying that it's dumb to say that a good school doesn't hire TFA teachers, thus TFA teachers must be worse than what a bad school district would otherwise have.  It's like saying metal detectors are what make DISD highschools unsafe because HPISD doesn't use them. 

OldWhiteyMcRight
OldWhiteyMcRight

Hey, maybe if the city spent less money arresting peaceful protesters we could afford to have schools.

scottindallas
scottindallas

different budgets, different taxing authorities.

StopDISD.org
StopDISD.org

With these school closings more questions arise like Eduardo Mata one of the schools listed for closing due to it being under capacity...this is a fairly new school it's only 14 years old why would the district close it?  How many millions were spent on constructing this school for it to sit empty?  Most readers are aware that just a few short years ago millions were spent to renovate O.M. Roberts only to turn around and demolish it this last August...while the new O.M. Roberts is under construction the O.M. Roberts students are attending Eduardo Mata the under capacity campus this school is just 4 minutes away and less than 1.98 miles from the O.M. Roberts school site.   So, once the new school is built the district will now turn around and close the 14 year old Eduardo Mata..does that make sense? 

 Remodel then destroy ~ Build new then destroy~ What a waste! It's OUR tax dollars and these monies should be spent on better education, better compensation for our teachers and preservation of historical schools and neighborhoods

Sammy
Sammy

Due to the popularity of International Baccalaureate, Woodrow and Long Middle are over-capacity.  It's not a good idea to put more elementary students into their zone, such as sending the Bonham students to Lee and Roberts to Mount Aubrn and Mata. It would probably be a good idea to send the Roberts kids to Dade Middle and  Madison High, which  are way under capacity.  As it stands now, half of the Roberts kids go to Woodrow and half to Madison.

That is if the new Roberts is still being built -- which seems to be put in question by a rec to close the school. Hasn't the old building been torn down?

Fazevelyn
Fazevelyn

Since they closed O M Roberts Elementary they sent ALL the kids to Eduardo Mata Elem.Pre-k thru third grade so they must be packed.They should send students to fannin and spread them around to other schools.Maybe that would help because my son is in pre-k and attends fannin elem.and i don't want him to leave because its a really great school.

Los_Politico
Los_Politico

Closing an elementry school doesn't put the students in a seperate high school zone.

I would argue that the Bohnam kids should go to Woodrow and the Roberts kids to Madison so that no one has to cross a highway. But these closures won't affect high school or middle school lines.

StopDISD.org
StopDISD.org

Yes, the building was demolished this last August.  Recently the district informed the parents and community that they plan on moving forward with building the new school and will proceed with paving a 114 space parking lot and geothermal fields in-between remaining homes across the school site. 

They've relesed the new O.M. Roberts plans.  The plans are on display at Eduardo Mata.

Fazevelyn
Fazevelyn

They certainly did send all the O M Roberts students to Mata

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

It wouldn't be a good idea to send any child to Dade.

Los_Politico
Los_Politico

Almost all of the schools are in near east Dallas and South Dallas. Both places that have been   losing students for decades (though for very different reasons). Hulcy and Arlington Park surprise me, but none of the others do.

10 years ago, about the time the district made the maps available, I commented that the utilization rates for Madison and Lincoln were such that if they were combined into a "South Dallas High" they could have one campus with 100% utilization. Except for the few years with the Katrina kids that has held true-- but closing high schools would face such a push back that it could never go through (Roosevelt should also be considered).

Also, I was unaware about Hexter and Hotchkiss in '82. Were they actually closed? Or was neighborhood pushback successful and they stayed open the whole time? I assume that's why Fannin kids went to Hexter until 2000 or so and why Hotchkiss was the Montessori magnet until about '94. Anyone know?

SA
SA

Huh.  First, a disclosure.  I don't live in DISD and didn't attend school there.  However, it seems to me that what it comes down to is, are DISD taxpayers willing to pay more to keep a few schools open?  I know what my answer would be.

In fact,, now that i think about it, does DISD even have any room to raise the tax rate?  Or is it at the state-mandated max?

LakeWWWooder
LakeWWWooder

I would think that Cochran Heights and Vickery Place, lovely historic charming neighborhoods with many toddlers not yet in school, would fight to keep Bonham open. Bonham is in a good position to enroll more of the affluent students as has happened at Lipscomb Elementary in Junius Heights.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

If the parents will band together and DEMAND what they want, they will get it and they will be able to reclaim that school from DISD bureaucratic insanity.

The PARENTS can make things happen, but they have to take the initiative.They have to go right to the trustee and spell out what they want.

All it takes is 1 large group (15 families) to go in together and the school will respond.The school will change forever.

It happened at Kramer, Adams, Marsh, Withers, Hexter, WT White, Lakewood, DeGolyer and all the magnets.

Los_Politico
Los_Politico

But Bohnam goes to North Dallas, so it's not even on the radar of those folks. Robert E Lee barely is and it goes to Woodrow

BigTex
BigTex

and Bonham is such a great building. Robert E Lee while far under capacity is a crap of a structure and so close to Stonewall too......come on DISD, Bonham, Lipscomb, Long, and Woodrow are the buildings to keep. Even Oran Roberts....

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