Dallas ISD Has a New Site. Which Looks Nice ...

NEWDISDSite.JPG
Went to look for something on the Dallas Independent School District's website ... only to discover that the DISD has a new website. Trustees got a sneak peek Thursday; it went live moments ago, turns out. It's certainly a nicer shade of blue than its predecessor. And, I see the schools' individual pages are now maintained on the district's site, and it's easier to find, say, TAKS scores than it used to be.

But with less than a week before school, there are some crucial missing pieces: If, oh, you're new to the district and not sure where your kid's supposed to go Monday, don't try the Find Your School page. "Page Not Found." And where's the check register? Give it a whirl; see what else you can't find.

Update at 10:16 a.m.: The old website's back up in place of the new one.

Update at 11 a.m.: The new site's back up.

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30 comments
Lucoelle
Lucoelle

The district is doing everything in its power to eliminate English Proficient teachers.  The deck is completely stacked for Hispanics.  They fill "bilingual" (read: Mexican)  classrooms with Mexican kids and stick a Mexican teacher in the room.  They load up special ed, low kids, and dyslexic students into the Regular ed / ESL classrooms.  This helps the Hispanic teachers with test scores.  The Bilingual classes are completely homogeneous, and usually with fewer students per teacher.  IT'S SEGREGATION.  The data office at the school is trained to aid parents in requesting Bilingual education.  If a white or black teacher has bad year, they're jerked around until they finally leave.  New hires in all positions are usually Mexican.  If a Hispanic (Mexican) teacher has a bad year, they're rewarded with keeping their same position.  Mexican principals are hired for being Mexican, regardless of lack of prior experience.  It's sickening that the public constantly berates teachers, meanwhile blindly footing the bill for illegals and Spanish speakers to get a big, expensive free ride.  Dallas ISD has lot of 'fat' in middle management, folks who create extra work for teachers, fill binders with papers, and force teachers into numerous meetings, useless trainings, time-wasting observations (Learning Walks and now Instructional Rounds), and constant interruptions.  It's almost impossible to do the job anymore.  Thank God Hinojosa is gone.  Please . . . stop the insanity.  Return to English (real English, not broken English or hood-rat English) education.  Stop turning  Dallas ISD into Mexico.  And may we please cease with the Cinco de Mayo and Diezseiz celebrations, and get back to Texas and U.S. pride?     

FrontRowSeat
FrontRowSeat

Might be interesting to look into who designed the website.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

-Don't bother with trustee emails.  Some trustees have said in the past that they do not read or respond to emails.  Many current trustees do not care what public opinion is on any given topic; they sincerely believe that is not what trustees do.-With several of them, even if they did return your email, they would merely be giving you the same spin they give reporters.  They will tell you half-truths, knowing you do not know enough to counter their crap.-Many trustees only respond to people with money or the power to financially benefit the trustee.-So glad we paid all those people up to $10K to quit and now we have multiple vacancies.  The school board spends OUR money very freely.-Ask your school board member what is going on in HR.  Are the staffing specialists processing paperwork as quickly as they can or is the board buying the standard "It takes time; we're short-handed; we're underpaid" nonsense?-Biliterate.  What a joke.  An extremely expensive, ineffective, and unnecessary approach to kids with limited or no English.  Are we paying Gomez and Gomez?  How much?  What does Plano do to meet the state requirements?  What does Richardson do?  How much do their requirement-meeting programs cost?-Our implementation of this ridiculous bilingual program forces fully-fluent kids into classes with teachers from outside the US who (90% of the time) are not certified teachers AND who are not themselves FLUENT IN ENGLISH.  You get 1 5th grade Science teacher in many schools.  Thanks to our program, all kids have to have the import teacher since schools can't pay an import teacher for the "bilingual" kids and a certified native-English speaker for the non-bilingual kids.

guest
guest

"not sure where you're kid's supposed to go Monday"

*your

Mister_Mean
Mister_Mean

Last time I checked their web page there were no email addresses for the trustees.   I just checked and there still are no email addresses.  I guess the last thing they (the trustees) want is to hear from us (the tax paying public) nor to be accountable to us.

TimCov
TimCov

While it looks good. I think the timing is bad. They should have either launched it a month ago or a month from now. This is the absolutely the worst time to relaunch an ISD's web site.

Rick
Rick

From Webster.com : biliterateThe word you've entered isn't in the dictionary. Click on a spelling suggestion below or try again using the search bar above.

Says it all, doesn't it...

Watching South Detroit
Watching South Detroit

That's ok - news reports say they are missing a few hundred teachers also.  The citizens of Dallas are getting their bang for the buck on those bloated administrator salaries at DISD headqurters aren't they?  Just more incompetence every day.  Did JWP get his unqualified cronies hired there?

Robert Wilonsky
Robert Wilonsky

Thanks. As I constantly have to remind people, I am a DISD product myself -- and the son of a DISD graduate. So I'm all kinds of sideways.

Luckylady
Luckylady

if you're going to comment, make it relevant and meaningful

DuckDuckGoose
DuckDuckGoose

Try Google:  "About 93,200 results (0.19 seconds) " including a Biliterate Certification Program at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio.

Sam
Sam

Really?  Seems pretty simple to me:  1. Hover over "Board of Trustees" tab  2.  Click "Board Contact Information"

Momoney
Momoney

Agree.  Rick needs to get a life. 

Rick
Rick

oh if Google and the Lady of the Lake University recognize the word, it must be true..HELLO!!! we have dictionaries...if it's not in there, it's not a real word...Maybe in use, but not real..and this is a School district, supposed to learn real words, not made up ones..

jcs
jcs

You really dislike DISD don't you?

Rick
Rick

I think you just proved my point.  If there is not an agreed upon definition (I think I count at least 8 references to what biliterate may be), it's not something generally accepted as an existing word into a commonly recognized dictionary.  But then again, I guess that makes it easier for DISD for one to become biliterate, as there is no common definition for it, who is a student to argue that he/she didn't receive proper education.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Arguing over semantics is one thing.Meanwhile, the trustees continue to misspend millions (with an m) of taxpayer dollars, thus killing job growth in Dallas and housing values.

jcs
jcs

I am troubled by your narrow minded thinking. May you have never heard of it, but many scholars have. Here is a brief discussion of biliteracy:      2.1. Biliteracy definitionsEarly scholars of biliteracy, such as Goodman, Goodman and Flores (1979), aswell as Fishman (1980), defined biliteracy as mastery of reading and writing intwo languages. Some scholars, retaining the notion of literacy as singular, didnot refer to the term biliteracy and spoke instead of literacy and bilingualism(Williams and Snipper  1990)  or  of literacy  across languages and cultures(Ferdman, Weber  and Ramírez  1994). Most of  these  studies, as we  will seebelow, focused on the  acquisition of literacy in a  powerful second language.Dworin ( 2003: 171) defined biliteracy as “children’s literate competencies intwo languages, to whatever  degree, developed either  simultaneously or successively.”  Reyes (2001: 98)  also defined biliteracy as mastery, but sheextended the concept to mean:From Biliteracy to Pluriliteracies4mastery of the fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing (knowingsound/ symbol connections, conventions of print, accessing and conveyingmeaning through oral or print mode, etc.) in two linguistic systems. It alsoincludes constructing meaning by making relevant cultural and linguisticconnections with print and the learners’own lived experiences … as well asthe interaction of the two linguistic systems to make meaning.Broader  definitions of  biliteracy have  been proposed by Pérez  andTorres–Guzmán (1996) and Lüdi (1997). Pérez  and Torres–Guzmán (1996:54)  defined biliteracy as “the  acquisition and learning of  the  decoding andencoding of and around print using two linguistic and cultural systems in orderto convey messages in a variety of contexts.”Basing his understandings on Street’s work (discussed below), Lüdi(1997: 207) proposed a broad definition of biliteracy as:the possession of, or access to, the competences and information required toaccomplish literacy practices which an individual wishes to – or is compelledto – engage in in everyday situations in two languages, with theircorresponding functions and in the corresponding cultural contexts,independently of the degree of mastery and the mode of acquisition (italics inthe original).Biliteracy, as defined by Hornberger, its most perceptive  scholar,describes “the  use  of  two or  more  languages in and around writing”(Hornberger 2003: xii)  or  “any and all instances in which communicationoccurs in two or  more  languages in or  around writing”  (Hornberger  1990:213). Hornberger adapts the  definition of  “literacy event”  given by Heath(1982: 83) as “any occasion in which a piece of writing is integral to the nature of  participants’interactions and their interpretative  processes”  in a  bilingualcontext. But precisely because  bilingualism  and biliteracy are  so complex,Hornberger speaks of biliteracy “instances,” encompassing not only events, butalso “biliterate  actors, interactions, practices, activities, programs, situations,societies, sites, worlds”  (Hornberger  2003: xiii; Hornberger  and Skilton–Sylvester  2000: 98; Hornberger  2000: 362). And Hornberger proposes amultifaceted model of a “continua of biliteracy,” which we describe below.

Handbook of Applied Linguistics on Multilingual Communication.Mouton.  2006

Rick
Rick

TimCov, I don't dispute that words that are not in a dictionary are used, and the more frequent those words are used, the more common those words become, the quicker they are added to a dictionary.  However, my point was about a school district using words that are not generally accepted as proper English on official media.As you yourself state, definitions change over time, but what defines a word?  That's where a dictionary comes in.  Biliterate doesn't mean a thing to me (MS Word doesn't even recognize it); it may mean two languages for one, it may mean multi-lingual for others; it may be limited to verbal communication, to written communication, maybe even sign language.  Without a proper definition that is agreed upon (i.e. in an accepted dictionary), it's just letters without a meaning.  

Schools should walk the walk and talk the talk, which in this case means that they should use proper English in their communications; that's all I meant to say.

TimCov
TimCov

You mean made up words like internet, fax or any of a dozen other technical terms? All of these started outside of the dictionary and then were added after they people had started using them. The only language that would not use words found in a dictionary is Latin. And, that is because it is a dead language. Languages adapt and change over time. Compare 21st century English to 17th century English and you will find a great many words that have been added or changed meaning in the intervening years. References such as dictionaries are trailing indicators of what words are used in a language, 

It would be one thing if you were complaining about them using the word irregardless. This is a word that should not be used because it contradicts itself and is specifically mentioned in English grammar texts as something that should not be used. Biliterate is a word that has come into common usage over the past several years and adds precision to our speech and the meaning of what we are attempting to say.

Rick
Rick

OMG, Yes, an should have been a; 2 is multiple, so technically I'm correct.And for the record, I'm not a SCHOOL, I'm an individual not in any way related to education.

jcs
jcs

You sound ridiculous."But the point is..an school should teach proper English, not made-up words. "   Your sentence criticizing the school's use of English is not grammatically  correct.  The "an"  should be an  "a".Bilingual does not mean fluent in multiple languages  it means fluent in two languages. Multilingual is fluent in multiple languages, neither term addresses written language. I am not normally a stickler on these types of things, but your narrow-minded post brought it out in me. I hope I have not fallen prey to missing the snark factor.

Rick
Rick

You're kidding me, right? Bilingual means just that...fluent in multiple languages..it doesn't specify verbal or written.  But the point is..an school should teach proper English, not made-up words.  Let's take your approach to a different field, say accounting.  Although it's not an approved accounting method, let's use an unapproved accounting method.  I believe that was the downfall of Enron (who did get it's new accounting method approved but that was later revoked).

TimCov
TimCov

How do you think words get added to dictionaries. They are invented, come into common use and are then added to the dictionary. Can you think of another word to replace biliterate (meaning fluent in written communication for two languages)?

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