It's Official: DISD Now Has More Academically Unacceptable Schools Than Exemplary Ones

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This never gets old.
The Texas Education Agency won't officially release its based-on-TAKS-scores state accountability ratings till 'round 1 this afternoon (here, for those so interested), at which point Commissioner of Education Robert Scott will hold a press conference in Austin. But the Dallas Independent School District's not wasting any time releasing its results, which are: 30 exemplary schools, 67 recognized campuses and 33 deemed academically unacceptable. That's about what the district has expected since early June -- and a far cry from last year's results, when DISD could boast of 63 exemplary campuses and 62 recognized, with but 15 on the unacceptable list.

We know what caused the precipitous drop -- getting rid of the Texas Projection Measure, which artificially prettied up the numbers (and which DISD really misses, if the this morning's release is any indication). But now what? Let's ask the interim super, Alan King.

"Dallas ISD taxpayers, parents, students and staff have every reason to be proud of the schools that received the state's top two ratings, particularly since the standards were raised this year," King says in a statement that follows in full. "At the same time, our staff makes no excuses for the schools listed as Academically Unacceptable and vows to provide additional support to them during the next school year. It should be noted, however, that Dallas ISD's achievement levels have not substantially changed. How ratings are calculated has changed."

We'll drill into the numbers when they come available -- and look at which schools ended up where. For now, of course, DISD's only released the names of the exemplary schools.

Update: On the other side is the complete list of DISD schools as classified by the Texas Education Agency. 2011 AEIS Data Campuses SummaryNow, from the district's release this morning:
School ratings for 2011 released by the Texas Education Agency today show that the Dallas ISD has 30 Exemplary schools, 67 Recognized schools and 33 rated as Academically Unacceptable.

Five indicators are used to determine ratings: 1) percentage of students passing the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS), 2) performance and progress of English Language Learning students, 3) percentage of students scoring at commended performance levels on TAKS, 4) completion rate for the 2010 graduating class and 5) annual dropout rate for grades 7-8 during the 2009-10 school year.

"Dallas ISD taxpayers, parents, students and staff have every reason to be proud of the schools that received the state's top two ratings, particularly since the standards were raised this year," said Interim Superintendent Alan King. "At the same time, our staff makes no excuses for the schools listed as Academically Unacceptable and vows to provide additional support to them during the next school year. It should be noted, however, that Dallas ISD's achievement levels have not substantially changed. How ratings are calculated has changed."

All six of the magnet schools at the Yvonne A. Ewell Townview Magnet Center were rated exemplary, as were the Irma Lerma Rangel Young Women's Leadership Academy, Dallas Environmental Science Academy, Travis TAG, George Bannerman Dealey Montessori, Longfellow Career Exploration Academy, Middle College and Harry Stone Montessori. In addition, the following elementary schools were rated Exemplary: Bonham, Casa View, Field, Hexter, Lakewood, Jimmie Tyler Brashear, Umphrey Lee, Mount Auburn, Elisha Pease, Charles Rice, Clinton Russell, H.S. Thompson, Ronald McNair and Robert E. Lee.

"The principals and teachers from these schools are to be commended for their work," said King. "They set the example for others in Dallas ISD to follow."

School ratings consider the academic performance of all student groups in each grade and each subject. Failure by any group to meet the standard in any one subject or grade can lower a school's rating.

A number of accountability standards changed in 2011. The standard to be named an Academically Acceptable school was raised 5 percent in both math and science. The state also required more special education students to be included in accountability ratings. New requirements, including commended performance and English language learner progress, were added for schools to be named Recognized and Exemplary.

In addition, the state no longer uses the Texas Projection Measure (TPM), which gauges indicators of future student progress. Had TPM remained in use, approximately 50 district schools would have been rated Exemplary, roughly 67 schools would be rated Recognized and 5 schools would have been rated Academically Unacceptable based on academic performance.

Districtwide, the percentage of Dallas ISD students passing the 2011 TAKS Mathematics test increased by 1.2 percent while the percentage of district students passing the state's science and social studies tests increased 0.9 percent in both subjects. The percentage of district students passing the state's reading test dropped 0.1 percent, while the percentage of district students passing the state writing test, given in both 4th and 7th grade, fell 1.2 percent.

Overall, the gains and decreases in Dallas ISD on the TAKS test were similar to how students performed statewide. Dallas' gains were greater than the amounts of positive change statewide in math, science and social studies. Dallas ISD also saw gains in all subjects except writing in the percentage of students passing at commended levels.
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73 comments
Robert
Robert

The 2010-2011 school year was my first year as a Dallas ISD teacher and this is what I learned during that year: 1) you don't need any fancy tools or programs to teach, 2) you don't necessarily need more money, 3) you need a strong desire to help your students and be able to follow up with hard work.  I had three sections that I was accountable for and with those classes I achieved a 95% passing rate for the reading TAKS, even my kids from special ed passed except two; one of which has a severe ADHD problem and the other one had a severe dislexia problem that had been undiagnosed.  I did not count with much if any support from parents and the chances of using homework as a teaching tool was a failure from the beginning.  So what did I do?  I tutored during Specials, after school and on Saturdays from the beginning of the year.  Not only did my students passed the Taks, they were also working on book reports and research projects with powerpoint presentations by the end of the year (I am talking about Third grade students here.  My students worked as hard as I did and they learned that learning can be fun.  These students were ELLs from low income neighborhoods but that was never an excuse but rather a banner that we carried with pride for we all knew that the system has been constructed in such a way that the expectation for us was already a low one and thus not passing was out of the question; the question for these students was to see who could be commeneded on both tests since TAKS was easy.  I have to say that I did have 100 percent support from my principal who trusted me to do whatever I thought was necessary to help my students succeed.  By the way, I had all types of students: the good kids and the hyperactive ones, the sweet ones and the bullies.  I had respectful students and some that would not pay attention at first and would become disruptivce at a moments notice.  However, I worked hard at establishing the rapport necessary to be able to invest them in what we were doing in the classroom.  I visited them at home and attended their birthdays, relatives baby showers, and christening to name a few.  I played soccer with them and provided a shoulder to cry on for those that had problems at home.  I was never judgemental and always treated these children the same way I would treat my own children.  I respected them and never talked down to them and they accepted me not just as a teacher but also as a mentor and friend.  In the end, they wanted to work hard to meet the high standards and expectations that I set for then and they learned that hard work truly paysoff. Most of all, we were never distracted by anything outside of our classroom.  We kept our eyes on the prize.  For me there was not time to think about budget crisis or the possiblity of layoffs. I was hired for one wonderful year to teach and that's what I did, enjoying every precious moment with my little ones.  Everything else was just politics a distraction I could ill afford to entertain given the high stakes of educating the children.

Diane Birdwell
Diane Birdwell

So, by "providing extra support" next year-- in 2 weeks, I am assuming that would mean holding teachers to a ridiculous rule of how many kids we can "allow to fail?" If a teacher has over 15-20%, the TEACHER is given an absurd list of things to do, what we call, "punishment." The students, eh, not so much. After a while, teachers learn what needs to be done, what it is they want... After all, "graduation rate" means graduating, not having learned... big difference. In a budget deficit year, what kind of help are they talking about, and why do they always wait until AFTER a school goes under to make that help available? Are they going to reduce the number of testing days, eliminate the CEI and let us just simply TEACH for once, or are they going to continue to micromanage us until we become little robots who all teach the same thing, the same way at the same time? Too bad the kids aren't robots who all learn, act and think the same way.... And since they cut the number of monitors, cops and in school suspension, we might see more referrals, more fights, more problems that will  bubble up...Nah, they will tell the media they are helping, when I can guarantee you, all year long, we will hear nothing but "stick" and no "carrot." It will not be whether or not Joanna or Devin learn something in my class, but if they "met the standard" on a mini-assessment, a benchmark, a six weeks exam, an EOC, an ACP or the TAKS, or any other fool thing.....

Joyce Foreman
Joyce Foreman

Thanks Hinojosa, you left us with one bigggggg mess.  I know you knew this was coming and got out of dodge as fast as you could.

Sam
Sam

As I understand it, special education students were added to the mix this year. Since they are in every subgroup, it caused the rankings to crater at some schools.  True?

freddy
freddy

How else can you explain the fall of always-exemplary Stonewall Jackson? It houses the school for the deaf, which also go on to Long and Woodrow, which also dropped.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Requirement to get Exemplary went up.Schools needed to have much higher percentage of stu get "commended."This is to hold the suburban schools more accountable.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

I don't think the SpEd addition was to blame.It's not like Special Ed students automatically took the regular TAKS for their grade level.Many took TAKS M, which is a modified version.All my SpEd kids passed my difficult content area's test.

It is more likely that schools were hurt by the LEP student addition and that is only going to get worse because of the bilingual program brought in by Hinojosa and enthusiastically embraced by Flores. 

Scores seemed to "fall" only bc last year they were very inflated by TPM.Not only was TPM removed, but the bar to be acceptable, recognized, and exemplary was raised.It was a double whammy.

The Soviets could not hide the disastrous effects of centralized planning and bureaucratic rule and neither can DISD.  At least the rich parents can vote with their feet and get their kids to safer shores.

rumpunch
rumpunch

I don't think that the LEP program is the root cause.  Every academically unacceptable high school failed to meet the 65% pass rate in Math for African American students. Several of these schools also failed to meet the standards for african american students in Science. Several of these schools also had problems in Math and Science with the hispanic students. However, I did not see any of these schools who did not meet the standards with regards to Reading and Social Studies. A few of the schools actually received Recognized ratings in these subjects. My point is, the minority students are being reached with regards to Reading and Social Studies at these same schools, what is the variance in Science and expecially Math? Take Carter HS. 82% of african american students passed Reading, but only 56% passed Math. Districtwide, 80% of african american students passed Reading (i.e. recognized performance) versus only 68% percent in Math.I have heard that a contributing factor was the change in Math curriculum, loss of the Director and unfilled math positions on campuses.  We now see how focusing on things other than academics will bit us in the a**.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

I don't disagree.My point was that I would think LEP would bring scores down before SpEd would. But I do think that LEP is going to be a problem.

I personally think the root problem is that TPM was removed the same year standards went up.

As to the variance between math/sci vs. rdg/ss scores, I know that at middle school the passing score was 48% for Soc Studies.  Who wouldn't pass that?  You only have to get a 48%.

Reading, I believe, is not on grade level.  In other words, the 5th grade reading test is not written at a 5th grade level.

Math and Science are hard subjects for most kids.  Add to that the terrible--really terrible--CPG for Algebra I and you've pretty much doomed the kids for the rest of high school.  Constant complaints from math teachers, constant frustration and only now does it look like changes are on the horizon.

Science is a disaster.  Training, coaches, CPGs--just awful.  Lots of complaints from teachers at my school but never a change in the makeup of the department.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Oh!  Get this:It is contended on the DMN blog that some teachers took the $10,000 buyout and have re-applied to fill all the bilingual positions THEY THEMSELVES VACATED.

If this is true, we just paid them an extra lump-sum payment of $10K.

Can you ask Dahlander if this happening?

Robert Wilonsky
Robert Wilonsky

I have asked Dahlander, who said he hadn't heard about this, but will look into it and get back to me Monday.

Michael MacNaughton
Michael MacNaughton

I may be mistaken but I believe there is nothing in the incentive to resign that would prohibit a teacher from re-applying for a teaching position and signing a new contract.

I was dead-set against the incentive to resign right from the start and was quite vocal that it would drain away many of the best and brightest (it did) but couldn't get the 5 votes to stop it and couldn't convince the Trustees to try $500 instead of $10,000. 

looking for blue in gray skies
looking for blue in gray skies

A least King gave a little pat on the head to those schools that STAYED exemplary and recognized (or even improved). What is DISD doing to find out what's working in these schools and try to replicate it instead of wasting MORE money on consultants bringing in recycled twaddle like the POLs?  My personal bet is that they will quickly find out that all 3 legs on the stool (school, students, parents) participate in those schools. (Among other wonderful, trendsetting, and perhaps rule-bending ideas.)

Sharon Boyd
Sharon Boyd

There's a big fenced vacant area on Webb Chapel (between Forest & Royal) where the DISD spent millions acquiring land for a school that should have been located south of Webb Chapel.   Rather than improve/expand Burnet (remove all the 11 year old out houses), they bought land miles north of where the need is.  Rather than buy up an aged apartment complex and locating a school where the kids are, they bought 2 brand new 2-story brick homes @ $450K each -- and demolished them.  Plus, there's a problem with water drainage on the expensive - wrong site.   That's where the $$ are going, not to teachers, not to kids, not to existing schools.

Sharon Boyd
Sharon Boyd

Meant to "should have been located south of Park Lane".

Michael MacNaughton
Michael MacNaughton

That money comes out of bond funds not general operating funds.

Don't waste
Don't waste

But, that doesn't mean DISD should make wrong decisions without exploring all their options.  They shouldn't waste the funds just because they are available. 

Bill Holston
Bill Holston

I have a question, if anyone knows. Casa View Elementary continues to be an exemplary school. I imagine that is a pretty lower income group of kids, and it's a Title 1 school. It's also a big school. What accounts for that success?  I'm betting they have a great principal, which is one of the reasons Hexter became a great school. What they are doing, well do that more.

John2247
John2247

I live in the Casa View neighborhood.  Many ESL students and low income.  Old building.  This description is usually used as an excuse for poor ratings but Casa View is making it work.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

There are, I believe, 2  "absolute" recognized middle schools in DISD.Everyone wants to know what their teachers do.

Instead, we get trained by the math coaches, the science coaches, the ELA coaches, and the Soc Stu department.  It's pathetic. 

We don't want to hear from irrelevant, off-campus bureaucrats.  We don't CPGs written by the same bureaucrats.  We want to know what the successful teachers are doing differently.

And what are their principals doing differently?What makes those schools successful?

No one knows.  Instead, we get the same ineffective people at Buckner and 3700 telling us what to do. 

Robert Wilonsky
Robert Wilonsky

Dahlander says that was thanks to the principal, Mike Paschall ... who, sadly, took the early buyout offered in the spring. Which means he's no longer there. And you may recall he was also among those rumored to be in the running for the interim superintendent's gig, which went to King.

Bill Holston
Bill Holston

First of all, thanks for asking. Your blog is  a tremendous resource, that we don't bother thanking you for often enough.

Second, kudos to Mr. Dahlander. He is always responsive to your questions. He has a damn hard job, and I appreciate his response.

He's one of those guys on Ross, and I think he does a handsome job with the information he's got to deliver. Thanks.

I think that school is important. Because these are poor kids, I imagine many if not most are English as second language kids, and they are doing a great job of educating them. I mean it, figure out what's working there, and do it more.

Cliffhanger
Cliffhanger

Just listening to people who know what they're doing? There's no money in that for anyone.  You just get a bunch of smart, motivated, successful kids.  I mean where are your priorities?

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

I second your props to Wilonsky.Mr. Wilonsky, you may have saved my marriage!

My kids walk thru the room and say, "Mom's blogging.  Unfair Park."

My husband is simply grateful that, thanks to Wilonsky, he doesn't have to hear me rant and rave about it all to him. 

My daughter wonders why I care so much.  I tell her I have a strong sense of justice, fairness, and pulling for the underdog--and then I get back to blogging.

It's not right to rip off 150,000 mostly poor children.  It's not right to warehouse them and mistreat them to profit a handful of already rich and overfed adults.  It's just not right.

mynameisURL
mynameisURL

<<it achievement="" are="" be="" calculated="" changed.="" changed."="" dallas="" has="" have="" how="" however,="" isd's="" levels="" not="" noted,="" ratings="" should="" substantially="" that="">>

I wonder if they spouted this little disclaimer when the "Texas Projection Measure" was first instituted.

Things that make you go "Hmmmmmm...."</it>

mynameisURL
mynameisURL

That first quote should have read: "It should be noted, however, that Dallas ISD's achievement levels have not substantially changed. How ratings are calculated has changed."

I hate you, URL.

rumpunch
rumpunch

DISD is still trying to make the same shoe fit all kids.  Some very good points have been made on this blog.  Chris Danger and Cliffhanger have made two very important points.  In an urban school District, we have the responsibility to preparing kids for their future.  Therefore all options high-tech, low tech and middle tech should be considered.

Chris - we should be teaching some of the kids high level computer skills to meet the 21st Century needs and Cliffhanger - we need to teach some of the kids building and auto trades.  Why don't we do both?

Take the innovation, energy and focus models utilized by the magnets, and replicate into vocational and technology programs.  Most kids just need to be shown the purpose for their studies.  How often did we hear in school, "why do I need to learn this?"  With these focused programs, that answer will be obvious.

Unfortunately, as this will cause education as we know it to disappear, we will get no support for the change from administrators.

yellowjacket
yellowjacket

DISD has 11 failing middle schools and 14 failing high schools. I would guess that this puts DISD as number one in the most failing secondary schools in the state and perhaps the nation. Since the budget was just built by cutting secondary schools at every point possible, big foam fingers expressing that accomplishment can now be passed out to all, for I am sure that number one position will not change no mater how calculated. 

Cliffhanger
Cliffhanger

This is the end result of five years of pretending to improve and padding someone's resume for a job in Georgia instead of actually trying to improve learning.  The BOT and the Administration played with smoke and mirrors instead of driving reform and holding themselves accountable, and this is the result.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

And the current school board members were complicit in allowing this to happen.Stand by for the DMN and D Mag's endorsement of the current board members when election time rolls around.

rumpunch
rumpunch

Don't forget the "Road to Broad" Several of the Board members did speak up, as did many of the parents.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Immediate steps:-Fire Donna Michauex.  Don't know her personally, but there has to be a consequence for being one of the people telling teachers to do exactly the wrong thing (pass kids no matter what).

Teachers have been hounded and harassed to use IFL's Principles of Learning, which are fine by themselves, but it hasn't been a 2-way street.  Serious teacher concerns have been ignored since the admin only knew how to say "Use the PoL's."  "Yeah, but a kid in my class just stabbed someone."  "Use the PoL's."  (okay, that's a slight exaggeration).

NO NEW "THEORIES OF TEACHING" TYPE OF NONSENSE NEEDED.  STOP GIVING OUR MONEY TO CONSULTANTS AND CONTRACTORS AND VENDORS AND SPEND IT LIKE THIS INSTEAD:

-Create remedial campuses for middle school failers all over the district.  Every quadrant of the city has under-populated elem schools.  Time to turn them into low-pop remediation magnets. Send every student who failed the state test or 2 core classes to the remedial school for a full school year.  STEP IN AND HELP THEM.

-Create hard-core counseling/remediation/behavior schools for middle schoolers who sell drugs, fight, or whatever.  1 full year.  No back and forth like at Village Fair.  Parents must attend parenting classes or student stays at Behavior Magnet.  STEP IN AND HELP THEM.

-BRING BACK VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS.  Booker T gets to exist.  We need Vocational Magnets around the city.  Give these boys and girls a skill they are interested in and will work to learn.  There is no shame in being a mechanic, a plumber, a beautician, etc. STEP IN AND HELP THEM.

Diane Birdwell
Diane Birdwell

And when do you plan to sign up to speak before the board?

Sam
Sam

I don't always agree with you DISD teacher but yes on the remedial middle schools - this is the crux of the problem. 

Michael Army
Michael Army

Holy Smokes !!!   I like that kind of vision.

Bill Holston
Bill Holston

"There is no shame in being a mechanic, a plumber, a beautician, etc." Not only is there no SHAME. There is in fact great honor. Or should be. These can be hard working people paying their bills. These are great jobs, and in fact needed. The cost of College is so high compared to the benefit, that I think the whole thing should be rethought. Yeah, Hinojosa talked about the new normal. Well as far as I'm concerned the new normal should be to end the class of over paid bureaucrats. Pay Teachers well. Fire them if they don't do their jobs. Train kids for the future.

Again, I say, don't hire another superintendent until someone notices the old one is gone.

John2247
John2247

Had any plumbing or electrical work done lately?  After paying my bill it gave me pause about the value of my 4 year college degree.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

I think you are wise and wonderful.

I tell my students that EVERY working person--regardless of the job--deserves their respect and consideration. 

We will never notice the loss of a superintendent.

As for your points about college, I wholeheartedly agree.  But DISD continues to push college on these kids so much that you'd think someone was being paid by the SAT company.  Oh, wait a minute....maybe that isn't so far-fetched...

rumpunch
rumpunch

Bill, I noticed he was gone. I cracked a $200 bottle of scotch to mark the moment.

We are probably the only developed country who does not train a skilled working class.  In the news the other night, we saw the issues with some of the trade schools putting their students into college level debt and not fully training them. 

Although, I believe that every child should start school and be given the opportunity to make it to college, at a certain point we will see that is impossible.  Although with scholarships, finance should not be the barrier, rather the barrier should be ability and desire.

Our current system tries (very unsuccessfully) to only prepare for college.  The current system (unless you are in a magnet, IB or other advanced programs) does not prepare you for college.  Nor does it prepare you for life.

The american dream is to live the best life you can for you and your family.  With a skilled working class, students can fulfil their dreams.  

Borborygmus
Borborygmus

This is very good. Very good.

Borborygmus
Borborygmus

This was supposed to respond to DISD Teacher's recommendations

Chris Danger
Chris Danger

I have no issue w/ Vo-Tech, especially in higher grades, but again, we need to make a focus for the 21st century than the 20th. Id rather see young people learn in classes teaching things such as IT/IS and small business managment than ltaking scalp care 101 from ms. lawanda at the annex center.

Another idea that we may want to look at is changing how we handle high school. Instead of making young people stay until senior year, I suggest a similar scheme to whats done in the UK, which is to say young people go to their 10th year(sophmore), then tests, then decides between either going to career building courses their last two years or takes college level courses if they're headed to college. Its a better system than what we have now and its been proven to work..

Borborygmus
Borborygmus

Chris, I think that is a slightly insulting view of the vocational trades.

However, I think instead of the district trying to do some of these in-house and build their own programs, wouldn't it be better to team with some technical schools that are already teaching these programs?  Spending 2 - 3 years trying to develop an in-house program only seems to invite more upper management. And during that period the kids this benefits would be losing out on quality training.

Cliffhanger
Cliffhanger

True, but there are still plenty of jobs in construction, machine repair, and other types of work that old-school vocational training applies to.  Hence, multiple magnets.  High-tech for those who have a knack and interest in that.  Low tech for those who don't.  Ongoing interests in school and better trained potential employees for everyone.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

We have a new Tech HS this year (in the old A Maceo Smith bldg).So, that option is there for interested kids.Brian Lusk is the ab-fab principal.Check it out--you'd probably really like the neat stuff they do.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Great idea!Fantastic idea!No reason it can't be done.

Chris Danger
Chris Danger

Borbory, That was the point of the message, as DISD is stuck in a mid 20th century mentality. Dont get me wrong, but we should be training young people for 21st century trades. I agree w/ you concerning partnerships with tech schools and other parties willing to work w/ young people. I'd rather see a young person receive an actual real-world certificate of their work(i.e ASC, MCSE, Cisco) they can take out post HS and start working accordingly.

Michael MacNaughton
Michael MacNaughton

exactly! 

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Maybe Morath and other trustees could start by reading this thread....just an idea...

Michael MacNaughton
Michael MacNaughton

hmmmm---I think I remember her defending Eric "Coward" and his vote to extend Hinojosa's contract but it was more of a reaction to the name-calling beat-down that Eric was getting.  Eric is a great guy, very mature and very strong. Name-calling may sting him for a bit but won't bother him in the long run.  Neither here nor there.

The DISD administration has become a group of vendor managers....not educators. The Trustees are political animals to a great extent but who have been trained to defer to administration management in all things.  Again, when things are going smoothly that is a fine course to take. I really believe we have a group of Trustees that can define and articulate a unified vision and a CFO/Acting Superintendent who can implement. 

I saw the administration take the Budget Commission questions and begin formulate action plans based on those questions...not just documents to refute or buffer the inquiries.  I am optimistic and hopeful....but hope is not a plan and optimism is not a choice.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

I completely respected Amy Cowan for getting on this blog once regarding some school issue.Of course, she's not the trustee, but still....she interacted.

It gets the ideas rollling.There is such wisdom in the community, but it seems the trustees only reach out and hear from either the slick salesmen or the silent HP types with some profit-driven scheme.

We don't need the trustees to reinvent the wheel.  We need them to humbly ask for input from parents and teachers and then direct 3700 to make it happen--not the other way around.

Michael MacNaughton
Michael MacNaughton

They ALL keep an eye on the blogs - even if they say they don't.  And all are smart enough not to post or to send proxy posters - you always get found out.  Besides, most have their own blogs if they want to stick a foot in a mouth. The DO blog and the DMN blogs have been very important these last two years as both back-channels and as test beds for ideas. Thanks to RW and JS for keeping public education issues in front of the public.

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