Railroad Museum at Fair Park Now Says It Has Money to Begin Building Frisco Site

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Says the museum, the Sante Fe Tower that's been at Fair Park since '96 "will be the most challenging structure to move due to its excessive height."
There hasn't been much action in the city's case against the Museum of the American Railroad at Fair Park, which city attorneys took to court at the end of January 2010 after the museum failed to choo-choo to Frisco as it had long promised to do. Long story short, the city wants the property back so State Fair of Texas officials can use it to display new cars during the fair.

The most recent filing, the first in months, dates back to April 22, when the museum's attorney, William Brotherton, filed a motion complaining that the city has, "throughout this litigation, continually delayed and hindered discovery" by making "frivolous objections." His lengthy laundry list of gripes, and a cache of internal missives to and from -- and between -- city officials dating back to the mid-1990s, follows.

But yesterday, the museum put on its website a release announcing that at long last it's ready to break ground in Frisco, having finally raised enough cash for construction. Says the release, groundbreaking is set for May 31 on the 12.34-acre site.

"It is very exciting and gratifying to be at this point in the project," says museum CEO Bob LaPrelle in a statement. "While our Capital Funding Campaign continues, we now have sufficient funds on hand to begin construction. This important benchmark enables the museum and its stakeholders to establish a true physical presence in Frisco and seek support for the next phase of work. We look forward to continuing and expanding the museum's nearly 50-year legacy of providing educational programs to North Texas."

No word on what this means for the pending trial; messages have been left for Brotherton, who's out of town till Wednesday, and First Assistant City Attorney Chris Bowers. Latest Filing in Railroad Museum Case
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10 comments
Gregdallas
Gregdallas

I guess they are still staying in fair park for free till they can find the money to move... lets at least charge them rent... they can pay in trains... by the time they are ready to move we will have all their displays. lol 

3rd Wheel Marketing
3rd Wheel Marketing

 I'd rather see rusting trains than new Chevys. The city should have cultivated the museum as an attraction. But new anything always wins over old and historic in this town, it would seem.

Oak Cliff Townie
Oak Cliff Townie

The display Is sorry excuse for a Train Museum.

The sign out front should have said Come see whats rusting!

Glad to see it will be gone !

However this is a real Golden era of the Train Museum with lots to see and do .

http://www.galvestonrrmuseum.c...

TimCov
TimCov

 What?! The City of Dallas trying to stop people who are legally entitled to information from obtaining it? That never happens.

Knows Too Much
Knows Too Much

Why charge the Museum rent when no other museum pays rent?  The Railroad Museum at least pays their own way with regard to maintaining the collection and their operations.  No other museum at Fair Park can say that.  Other attractions at Fair Park are also subsidized by the City.  But yeah, why not try to stick it to the most independent attraction at the park. 

gregdallas
gregdallas

the city did try to help them... and we got a black eye for our trouble...  

Haretip
Haretip

 Can't say I was impressed with Galveston's rusting hulks and that was before they went underwater in the last hurricane. I think MAR will do great things once they get enough real estate to actually do something. The cupboard of property they had was just not sufficient to do much with. The plans for the land in Frisco are quite impressive for flyover land.

Haretip
Haretip

Help? How? Dallas dropped the ball on this one.

Knows Too Much
Knows Too Much

Dallas offered 2.5 m in bond money with the requirement that the Museum use that money to purchase a small almost unuseable piece of land adjacent to the present location that would not help display one of the five finest railroad collections in the US (according to the smithsonian).  But sure, the Dallas folks want to say they tried to help.

alfredo
alfredo

 Dallas didn't drop the ball, 2.5m was included in bond funds to be matched by the Museum.  The Museum just felt Frisco made a better offer and took it.  After that the fight started

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