Now You Too Can Watch the Dallas Film Society's Horton Foote Cinematic Highlight Reel



Shortly after the kick-off of Foote Festival, the through-May 1 area-wide celebration of the life and work of Wharton native Horton Foote, a Friend of Unfair Park bemoaned the fact there was but one of his films featured as part of the fest: Foote's adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird, which screened last month at the Studio Movie Grill. Why not Tender Mercies? The Trip to Bountiful? Or even The Chase (a guilty pleasure)? A missed opportunity.

Instead, we do have this highlight reel assembled by the Dallas Film Society for last Friday's awards ceremony at Union Station, where Horton's daughter Hallie claimed his Star Award. The DFS kindly made it available today, along with other compilations featuring the works of actors and filmmakers feted throughout the 10-day Dallas International Film Festival. Which is why, on the other side, you'll also find Ann-Margret at the State Fair.


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7 comments
Weepingorilla
Weepingorilla

Jerome Weeks isn't so smart. He apparently doesn't know about the 1972 Robert Duvall movie "Tomorrow" - screenplay by Foote.

LaceyB
LaceyB

What of "Of Mice and (free) Men"?

Ellum08
Ellum08

Thanks for posting that, Robert.

I didn't realize he did 'Of Mice and Men'. Great adaptation.

CindyS
CindyS

Thanks for this, Robert. Horton Foote was a gift to us all. I have seen all of the films in the DFS compilation--the early ones when I didn't know who he was, the latter because I did.

Jweeks
Jweeks

Don't know if this was the festival's thinking or not, but there's a good reason not to feature 'The Chase,' either at the festival or in this video roundup. It's really not his work up on the screen. According to Foote biographer Wilborn Hampton, nothing in Foote's screenplay was ultimately used. Adapting his original stage play was taken over by Lillian Hellman and the producers -- Foote kept screen credit and the money but that experience (and working on the lurid 'Hurry Sundown' the next year) soured him on Hollywood. Which is one reason there's a gap in his screenwriting credits between the early-mid-'60s and the late '70s-early '80s.

Robert Wilonsky
Robert Wilonsky

And that, right there, is why Jerome Weeks is not only the handsomest man in local arts criticism, but also the smartest.

JWeeks
JWeeks

[blushing]

i bet you say that to all the girls.

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