Wherein We Talk to the Realtor Trying to Sell Two of Downtown's Greatest Assets

elmplace1.JPG
Justin Terveen
Inside 1401 Elm Place, the George Dahl-designed former First National Bank tower
John Crawford and I just had a long talk about downtown -- since, ya know, it is his thing. And later today I'll get to some of newsier items he revealed during the course of our chitchat. But I'd originally phoned the president and CEO of Downtown Dallas Inc. to talk about two downtown buildings that are still up for sale -- two of the biggest in downtown, matter of fact: 1401 Elm Street and 1907 Elm (otherwise known as the Tower Petroleum Building, the last of the downtown art deco greats, next door to the Majestic Theatre).

About eight years ago, you may recall, there were plans to turn architect Mark Lemmon's 1931 Tower Petroleum into condos; then came word it would become a hotel; then the economy tanked; now, nothing except a $7.9 million price tag hanging off the side of that extraordinary building. As for 1401 Elm, that's the 52-story, 1.3-million-square-foot George Dahl-ing emptied out and closed down at the beginning of 2010. But when it went back on the market last May at the low, low price of $19 million, Collier's International's exec veep David Glasscock was optimistic it would sell sooner than later.

Glasscock and I spoke again today, and he says, sure, he's had nibbles on both, but nothing substantial -- for the obvious reasons.

"There's just a lot of money sitting on the sidelines right now," he says. "We're seeing some institutions being more realistic about the market price of properties these days, and 1401 is a million-plus office building, and it takes somebody with a lot of vision and equity capital to take it. You don't eat all the elephant at once. You take one bite at a time. And that building is an elephant."

insidetowerpetroleum.jpg
The lobby of Tower Petroleum, as depicted in the Collier's sales brochure
Crawford says that in recent months, his organization's had "an enormous amount of interest in people looking at 1401, more than Tower Petroleum." And part of that, he says, stems from investors seeing real change come to downtown -- or at least, the promise of and potential for change. He points to Leobardo Trevino's purchase of the old LTV Tower and the Statler Hilton and old central library and says, "People are looking to take advantage of the changing face of downtown." Which is why, Crawford says, he's had three calls in the last three days about the old Crozier Tech -- which the California-based owner has said he'll sell over his dead body, just to spite the city.

"What's going on downtown is piquing people's interest inside and outside of Dallas, and 1401, with its parking capabilities and location on DART, and with people trying to be creative with big buildings downtown, is a project ripe for development. But there's a downside -- the size of it." Which Glasscock would agree with -- whoever winds up with the project will need to develop it floor by floor, as Trevino's hoping to do with the Grand Ricchi on Pacific.

"It's over a million square feet, and trying to get something that large financed, redone, cleaned up, etc., is very difficult," Crawford says. "The people I've talked to, we haven't gotten past first base on moving forward. But people continue to look at 1401 and Tower Petroleum, and there are all kinds of options and variations people talk about. But it's big, and people talk about the price not of the building, but of the redo.

"And it is a concern: Because of where it is, the size of it, we would hope it would not sit there forever in its current state. But it's a concern about how quickly something can be done with that size of a project. The Tower Petroleum is a different animal. It's not as big, but there's not any parking. We were going to do a hotel there, and we were well down the road till the market changed."

Glasscock says, sure, the asking price remains $19 mil. But the owners would no doubt be willing to budge; some real-estaters I've talked to said they thing the building can be had for around half that. Which is still a hell of a lot, given the redo's the thing that'll eat 'em alive. It's what Glasscock calls "sweat equity -- and this take a lot of sweat equity ... that, and a lot of capital." Guts too, he adds.

"Whoever purchases it will have to have a vision and a strategy, because you can't abate it and fill it overnight," he says. "It takes a long time to get your arms around a project like this. Maybe it'll be a foreign entity that has a vision, that says, 'This has been done before in Frankfurt, Paris, somewhere else in the world.' And it'll need to be somebody with equity."
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17 comments
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Mike
Mike

Oh my, Dallas has a great asset really!. And it is good if He already found a buyer for it. Mike Warren

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

Renovating something like this is going to take bucket loads of sweat...and blood....and tears...and possibly first-born children. hopefully we have enough talented people with access to funds living here in Texas that we won't have to rely on a foreign entity...

joint venture anyone? I've got $20 in my wallet right now. LOL

CAHater
CAHater

Who's this california-based d-bag who owns Crozier tech?

Lakewoodhobo
Lakewoodhobo

Seriously, that land is so undervalued on DCAD that we may as well be paying that man to stick us the finger. Oh wait, we are.

Hannibal_Lecter
Hannibal_Lecter

How can you undervalue something that is basically worthless? As long as the city prevents tearing down that eyesore the land is unusable, and thus has no value.

Lakewoodhobo
Lakewoodhobo

Have you seen that land? It's a big giant chunk of land with one currently standing building that occupies a small percentage. How does that small building make the entire plot worthless?

LaceyB
LaceyB

"Glasscock...nibbles..." I really, really tried, but I'm busting up. Bursting? Is that more appropriate?

Anywho, the picture of the Tower Petroleum is making me salivate...(really. Swear?) The elevator doors remind me of "The Shining". I'd leave that untouched. Just gorgeous.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Instead of "where's your G spot" (oops, OMG, Freudian slip!) maybe DowntownDallas Inc. should invest in a campaign to get people in the suburbs to consider moving downtown. No frills or sexual innuendo, just a simple message to empty nesters and singles like "rediscover downtown Dallas" or "Big D is back. Move here."

The more people live downtown, the more desirable these empty buildings will become for conversion to residential or hotel.

Lakewoodhobo
Lakewoodhobo

Yes, Tower Petroleum has a parking problem, but wouldn't the city let the developer build a parking garage for it (and 1900 Pacific) underneath Pacific Plaza? I assume Mr. Glasscock has told any prospective buyers that they don't have to buy any new land for the parking structure.

Even if Pacific Plaza is built as a parking garage before the actual park is designed, it can be left unfinished for whenever it's ready (similar to Stonehenge / Hall Arts).

moderndrift
moderndrift

I'm sure the city would gladly let a developer build an underground parking structure, it is the cost that will never let that happen. Underground parking for one building (even a hotel that is all valet parking, therefore requiring less spaces) is prohibitive, let alone two buildings where one is residential or office.

Who Ray
Who Ray

Ask Dallas County how much it cost the citizens of Dallas County to build the new parking structure under the park down in the courts area of the City! Only the government could afford to build such a structure.

Guest
Guest

Do you guys have "George Dahl-designed" saved as a macro? Seems like that would be a huge timesaver when writing about Dallas buildings.

Robert Wilonsky
Robert Wilonsky

Not a bad idea. True story: The boy's doing his second-grade book report on Willis Winter's Fair Park book -- I know, I know. His idea, though. Anyway. We were reading last night about the '36 Texas Centennial Exposition, which wouldn't have happened without Dahl and R.L. Thornton. He wanted to know which buildings Dahl designed outside of the Fair Park redos for the Expo. I told him 1401 Elm, among others, which we toured right before it closed in January 2010. He asked: "Is that the empty building that leads into those cool tunnels?" Tear drop.

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