Neumann and Griggs Clash Over Gas Drilling, Walmart, Cliff Manor and Trinity Toll Road

Neumann_Griggs_Merten.jpg
Photos by Sam Merten
Two-term incumbent city council member Dave Neumann and political newbie Scott Griggs at last night's debate in North Oak Cliff.
Following the mayoral forum held last night at Methodist Hospital's Hitt Auditorium, District 3 city council candidate Scott Griggs and incumbent Dave Neumann took their turn to disagree on several issues -- including gas drilling, that Walmart, affordable housing at Cliff Manor and the Trinity River toll road.

Griggs quoted Neumann as previously referring to gas drilling as "a sweetheart deal that's good for the taxpayers," while Griggs supports a moratorium on the practice until the environmental effects are known. He also criticized Neumann for failing to act after claiming he'd form a task force to address the issue, resulting in yesterday's memo from council member Angela Hunt urging the city to create the task force. Neumann stressed he postponed the vote on a drilling permit request for city-owned land at Hensley Field until October to ensure "the politics and science match up."

Griggs also voiced opposition to plans by Walmart to build a neighborhood market on Fort Worth Avenue near Hampton Road, claiming the land it would occupy represents the last 18 vacant acres in North Oak Cliff. He said no one in the community was consulted about the plans and the site should be saved for "something really special."

"Too often in the southern sector, we settle," he said. "We get the zoning in place, the vision in place the financial incentives in place, and we take the first thing that comes along. That's not right, and that's not how we're gonna move forward. We absolutely shouldn't settle."

Neumann_Griggs2_Merten.jpg
Neumann praised the proposed development but claimed he hasn't seen a site plan yet. He noted Walmart has a six-month option on the property, and he'll ensure it's "truly a neighborhood market."

Griggs didn't wait for a question from the audience regarding the situation at Cliff Manor, mentioning it after his comments about Walmart. He pointed out that Neumann knew about the proposed low-income units a year before residents found out in The Dallas Morning News but "kept it a secret."

Neumann said the implementation of the units "shocked us all" and "was a surprise," stressing he reduced the number of low-income apartments from 100 to 50. He claimed it's something the community will eventually embrace.

"Today there's no uptick in crime in the corridor," he said. "Today the surrounding school says they feel fine and safe and secure. Today there is a feeling of cohesion and community aspect as it relates to Cliff Manor and being part of the community."

Griggs sold himself as "a council member for everyone" and announced his cell phone number. He said he wants the same things as everyone else: safe neighborhoods, new businesses, retail, good paying jobs and ensuring the taxpayers get their money's worth. The 36-year-old lawyer also said he understands the district, knows the issues and has a leadership style based on transparency.

"The way I get things done is I listen," he said. "I put a vision in place. I make decisions. And then I execute."

Neumann described himself as involved and engaged in the community and said his service is based on "family, faith and small-business expertise." The chair of the council's Trinity River Corridor Project Committee since 2007, Neumann unsurprisingly said he supports the Trinity River toll road. However, he admitted that it might not be built.

"The citizens twice voted for the Trinity Parkway. I agonized the first time and the second time as a voter," he said. "Our challenge now is to make it work cost effectively. Now, just because I'm for it, doesn't mean necessarily it will happen. It has to be done cost effectively."

Griggs said he remains opposed to the road after voting against it in the 2007 referendum, and he ripped Neumann for attempting to widen Beckley Avenue to an eight-lane "superhighway." Griggs led the successful effort to block the move by Neumann's committee as president of the Fort Worth Avenue Development Group.

"It took the community going down out there, laying on that road and saying, 'We are not going to be cut off from our Trinity,'" he said.

Both candidates issued awkward comments during the forum. While discussing redistricting, Griggs said all races need to represent each other and felt the need to point out that his wife, Mariana, is Hispanic before saying, "I certainly feel like my wife does a good job representing me, and I do a wonderful job representing her."

And Neumann had the audience thoroughly confused when he issued the line: "My job as a councilman is to listen, to lead but to listen."

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57 comments
shrubstex
shrubstex

One of the major problems with planning and zoning issues today is the process. It seems today that when a project is proposed all the city council man or woman in the district does is call a town hall meeting and let the developer sell the project to the voters. Then the council person acquiesces to the mob so to speak. The councilman never makes a decision based on all the factors that go into good real estate development. With Dallas's landlocked position, we need to build up to get more residents. We need to have greater density. a true city leader would push for high density affordable housing in the city. He would also push for higher density commercial areas and then areas where the 2 would be combined. Ed Oakley was the last councilman we had had that understood this. Elmwood has a vast unused area of commercial zoning that sits waiting for multiphase development.Ms.Garcia punted on that one by taking the popular view. Let Griggs sell us that he can do better.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

and no, I'm not Neumann. LOL Just merely pointing out no one person can do damage to an area - they had help. If you're worried about Oak Cliff, get with the property owners and impose some deed restrictions on private properties that restrict uses, that won't allow anything over a certain sq. ft., that impose utility requirements, etc. As long as property is zoned in such a way that allows undesireable uses there's nothing that can be done by the public before the building permit is acquired. To add to that, you can't just rezone property arbitrarily. Deed restrictions are powerful as they are enforced between the property owners.

Snookie Pie
Snookie Pie

Deed restrictions? I think you have this confused with a different term. Perhaps you are thinking of Overlay, or SUP, or Zoning changes. But not deed restrictions. That is the term used in a newer residential subdivision. And, those usually expire after certain number of years. Deed restrictions are normally placed there by the Seller of property. Usually the Developer of a subdivisions puts them on each house lot so that buyers can be sure that all the houses in the subdivision will be forced to adhere to set standards. Deed restrictions are not levied by a governmental body (City).

Come to think of it, Arbuckley, you do sound like Dave Neumann. LOL.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

Oh, and one more thing. Please note, this is a city application requiring council approval. The deed restrictions are then posted on the city attorney's website and identified on zoning maps. Process is the same as with zoning changes. you can create new deed restrictions, amend old ones or terminate existing ones that have gone through the process.

http://www.dallascityhall.com/...

dfwrez
dfwrez

I didn't know about this - thanks for posting the link.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

have a good evening, snookie pie. :) It's been fun.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

no, I meant deed restrictions. They occur on commercial properties as well and they can last indefinitely - rolling over with subsequent property owners. you're thinking protective and restrictive covenants. not the same thing.

Oak Cliff Townie
Oak Cliff Townie

Again Not taking a shot at them,

The question is How did the Community leaders of the Scott Griggs and Jason Roberts get caught unaware this was in the MIX ?

\

Who Ray
Who Ray

If the City leaders had their act together, and if they truly had attracted Walmart's interest in the site, why doesn't the city implore Walmart to work with them toward bring a project that would make the community happy, and also satisfy Walmart's requirements. To summarize, the community wants a "Town Center" mixed use development. The "city" shoulkd take the lead in trying to integrate Walmart into the original "vision", and use Walmart's strength as an anchor retailer to make the entire Town Center concept happen. Now, that would take some real creativity, some hard work, some time, and a few dollars to accomplish. But, it might just be worth it for the betterment of the community.

Lili Lin
Lili Lin

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Bettyculbreath
Bettyculbreath

Please North Oak Cliff go to Uptown and see the Wal Mart Community Market,it is not big box,it looks similar to Tom Thumb with lots of speciality fresh produce.It does not carry all item the box stores stock.Look before you get bent all out of shape.There is no requirement that a developer has to contact homeowners and ask what they want or permission to build if the land use and zoning is compatible. Get over Cliff Manor ,Federal law prohibits discrimination in housing.Homelessness is not a defined class. If your house burns tonight,you would become homeless by definition.What if the local hotel said,We do not rent to people who burn their home, and are homeless. Think about it!

Snookie Pie
Snookie Pie

Betty, You talking about the dumpy, piece of shit store at Hall/Central Expressway? The one the all central Division crimewatch chairs warn their neighborhoods to be very careful, watchful, for all the crime? The place is horrible. Specialty produce, my foot. Rotting produce is more like it. And, I keep saying this: stay far far away from their meat area.

Branden Helms
Branden Helms

The point is not the Wal-Mart per se, but the form of the Wal-Mart. They worked to design an area that encourages walkability through design, but instead got a suburban box retailer with a parking lot two to three times bigger than the actual building, or decidely un-urban and walkable.

http://anurbanrambler.blogspot...

Gary R
Gary R

Betty, you are not upscale. You do not understand. That Uptown Wal-mart you speak of is a dump. There is chronic crime in the parking lot. They do not carry decent, quality produce. And, their meat makes my skin crawl.

They service the needs of people who are on foodstamps.

Not the needs of couples who feed their children organic produce, milk, babyfood. Not the needs of people who live in the Kessler neighborhoods. We do not want to shop at a Walmart with processed food and crap store.

We drive $60k plus cars, live in $250-$600k homes, have Masters degrees. Our children attend private schools.

Heck, Walmart doesn't even sell the type dog food we feed our pampered pooch.

Walmart belongs in low-income areas. That is where their business comes from. Section 8 homes.

So, here we have the only, ever, large land lot in prime area near our homes. We could try to pressure City to zone for good, enjoyable development, and you think we want Neumann to take kickbacks from Wallmart so he can throw up a Section 8 drawing, foodstamp shopping, crime magnet Walmart on the land.

Neumann is out for his own benefit and he does not care what neighborhood, or area, or business, or resident he screws on the way.

busterkeaton
busterkeaton

Dude, are you being sarcastic or what? I don't think you are and that concerns me. Those poor folks were there, when all them white(upscale) folks, decided to head to paler pastures, so quite with your class prejudices and subliminal racist remarks. Just because it's trendy now, to once again reside there, doesn't give you some edge over those who were there... when nobody even wanted to spit in that direction. Another reason why I lament for the "New Oak Cliff" or better yet(actually worse) "The Great Class Cleansing".

Edgar
Edgar

It's not that great, but most of your complaints have as much to do with its location along the U.S. 75 access road as the store itself. The store is not my favorite, but it's at least twice as good as the Minyard's at Hampton and FWA. Whereas the WM is poorly staffed and has a poor selection, the Minyard's is extremely poorly staffed, has a terrible selection, and is incredibly dirty. Betty is actually right about the footprint...it is not a huge big box with acres and acres of parking...it's a grocery store.

Are we gentrifying FWA or not? If we are, screw WalMart. If w're not, then WalMart would be probably do a good business from the people who shop at that intersection now.

busterkeaton
busterkeaton

The hipsters in Oak Cliff don't want a Walmart, because it's not cool... and then they want be able to puff their noses up to those north of them.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

to add to your comment...the funny thing about Walmart is...they don't build if the demographic isn't there to support their stores. Walmart is also a major employer in every city. I'm always a little sad to hear people say they boycott Walmart because of blah, blah, blah...Everybody wants 'local' business as opposed to national and I'm all for that if that option is available but so far, nobody 'local' has developed the site. I suppose it's all a matter of perspective. I look at how many 'local' PEOPLE will be working and supporting their families rather than the fact it's a national vs a local store.

Wes
Wes

You are joking, right? Walmart is a major employer? Do you have any more of whatever you are smoking?

Walmart hires a bunch of low-wage, unskilled workers, mostly illegal aliens, and puts them on as "part-time employees" to avoid having to cover insurance and other benefits. It would take a blathering idiot to believe that Walmart is a major employer.

Texas Instruments is a major employer. It hires well-educated people and pays them decent, livable wages with benefits. LTV is a major employer. It does the same. Raytheon, Abbott Labs and other companies like them are major employers.

Walmart exploits the weakest in our society and violates federal labor laws by hiring illegal alients. Hiring a large number of people does not make one a major employer. Hiring people for livable wages is far more important. If Walmart hired legal citizens and paid them decent wages, then they would be nowhere nearly as profitable as they are today, and that is precisely why they exploit those who cannot get work somewhere else.

heart and soul
heart and soul

I know many people that won't shop at walmart and I am one of them. I am not going to support any company that won't pay a living wage. Glad to know that their are others that boycott them. And who wants their responsible business next to a walmart.

Walmart is bad for Dallas and bad for our country.

dfwrez
dfwrez

Marc - I cook with their salsa...hang on...gonna go read the label. Mine just says distributed by Walmart, Bentonville, Ark. fishy the 'made in' isn't on there. hmmm..could be for the reasons you just identified. Definitely looking into their business practices now.

Marc
Marc

DFWREZ, Walmart and Sam's Club get a lot more than just those two brand names from China. In fact, almost 100% of what they sell is imported, and that includes most of teh food products. If you read the labels you will see the countries of origin. Walmart would not be in business if it were not for importing goods from Third World countries that use slave labor, child labor, unhealthy workplace conditions and inhumane treatment to generate goods at bargain basement prices.

dfwrez
dfwrez

maybe the city can require walmart to provide documentation that 75% of their workforce would be full-time before they are given any incentives? I don't know. I used to work for walmart when I was in college. I was about 23 and had a one year old daughter and we made it on what I made. It was tough but we did it. I did have to put her on CHIPS though so I see what you mean by government assistance. We didn't have any other assistance besides that.

I used to live by the nice one in Plano next to the tollway before I moved to Dallas and it was ok. I shopped there even though I made almost 6 figures and lived in a nice 3k sq.ft. house. I didn't realize they got their stuff from 3rd world countries - I assume you are talking about their Sam's Choice/Great Value stuff. I wonder how they can keep cost down with those kinds of logistics? I'm thinking I should look into how they run their business. Thanks for the info.

Deb K
Deb K

I agree with Wes. I would not buy or support any Walmart. In fact, I would drive miles out of my way to not spend my money inside Walmart. Walmart is destroying our country. And, yes, Wes is correct, they exploit and destroy their employees. They do not provide adequate pay to their employees. They play little games of only giving them part time hours, below 32 per week, so that they will not be required to offer benefits of any kind, or to offer any insurance. They pay minimum wage to their employees. So, here you have a huge corporation that is undermining the economy by essentially employing all these part time workers, but those same people must still go apply for government assistance to provide for food, housing, health care--all the while Walmart gets richer and richer.

Tell me how a parent could possibly support their family on less than $900 per month.

Walmart's products are all made in third world countries that exploit workers, employ children, and have no concern for safety.

I may not be much, and, last time I check, Walmart isn't going bankrupt just because I do not spend my money in their store, but at least I feel good about taking a stand.

Ditto for Sam's Club--they are owned by same...the Walton family.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

LOL - ok so major employer to you means $$/annually. Like I said before, they don't build in an area unless the demographic will support it. But, you seem to have a firm grasp of the Walmart model and know their inner workings better than I do so I'll consider withdrawal of that comment.

Love the name calling by the way. Takes me back to my youth.

have a blessed Sunday.

who ray
who ray

I seriously doubt anyone could support a family on the wages paid for working at a Walmart. Try Again.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

sure they can. I've known several through the years who've done it but then I have friends of every economic background.

Branden Helms
Branden Helms

Wal-Mart also has the highest percentage of employees on some kind of government assistance than any other entity, thanks to their low wages and pathetic benefits package.

And yes, they do open stores with the intent of closing them down eventually. They do it all the time to run out competitors. I find it hard to believe there are less than a dozen Wal-Marts within Dallas now and there is the ability to more than double that.

Edgar
Edgar

Define "eventually." Opening a store for a season for the sole purpose of squeezing the competition might work in extremely isolated cases, but you're overstating your case(s). If you're right, the end result is that non-WM store gets killed off, and the WM then closes...one less store than at the outset. Killing another chain's store won't redirect customers to WM, because, by your count, there are only 12 of them. In most cases, shoppers get grocery near home, or near work, or somewhere on the path in between. That's a pretty bold economic argument...I doubt you've had the benefit of examining the elasticities of shoppers' preferences.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

Griggs almost had me until: "The way I get things done is I listen," he said. "I put a vision in place. I make decisions. And then I execute." So...he's going to put a vision in place, he's going to make the decisions and then he's going to execute - I suppose while the other 14 sit in awe and watch? Too many "I"s in his replies..hey, that rhymes. LOL

With regards to both of them and Cliff Manor - it's multi-family land use. It's a zoning issue or non-issue in this case. Upsetting or not, it was still an allowed use and not a good issue for a candidate to stand on either way - that issue is made of sand.

With regards to both of them and Wal-Mart, if nobody wanted big box stores at that location, a council hearing should've been requested by the people in the area ages ago to request a rezoning. perhaps a meeting or two with the property owner to discuss viable alternatives? But wait...it's been vacant all this time...hmmm. WM is also a permitted use at that location and the property owner was well within his/her/their rights to review and even accept WM's offer. Again, not a good issue to try and gain support.

And why would I care what Grigg's wife's ethnicity is??? That was relevant to redistricting, how??? Of course he and his wife represent each other well...and???

Both candidates are reaching...

henhouse
henhouse

Scott Griggs, along with the Fort Worth Avenue Development Group and many other neighbors, did exactly what you have suggested with regard to rezoning the site of the proposed Wal-Mart. This group of pro-active neighbors managed to push through form-based zoning for that land parcel that encourages mixed-use and walkability. What myself and many in our District are concerned about, is that Mr. Neumann will continue his legacy of making deals behind closed doors (as he did with Cliff Manor and the Gas Drilling issue) and undo all of the progress we have made. We don't want to find out, 6 months from now, that the land has been re-zoned again to sweeten the deal for Wal-Mart. I think that is the point Mr. Griggs was trying to make.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

I know what happened on this site and I'm well familiar with Article XIII of the zoning code and form based zoning. With regards to Cliff Manor, it was an allowed use - that building had been used for low-income housing for years - do just a little homework at the city and you'll see that. There was no "deal" to make other than asking the owner to reduce the units - which they did NOT have to do. The city can't discriminate over who lives in the units.

Land can't be rezoned without public knowledge. WalMart has prototypes that would fit in with form-based zoning so again, the city's not going to discriminate if they can meet the requirements in effect for the property. I'm not a supporter of either candidate but before everybody gets up in arms about things, do some research on your own. you just might find, things are not as they have been portrayed in the media. NEITHER candidate will be able act solely on his own when it comes to land use issues. Too many statutory requirements.

abuckley1970
abuckley1970

@Marc - those bright red/white/black zoning signs go up 2 weeks after every zoning application is submitted and they stay up until council takes action - about 4-6 months. The public can call the number on the sign to inquire at any given point or at the very least call the plan commissioner/council person to see what's going on. There is also the public hearing at the plan commission that comes prior to council, which is the first step in the process. Early notifications are mailed to those owners (not tenants) within the 'affected' area prior to both hearings. (the affected area are those owners located normally not more than about 500' away from the site. anybody can call and request to be put on the city's early notification list.) It's also advertised in the paper. And yes, I've sat through many, many commission and council hearings. the only reason something ends up on the consent agenda is because there was no public opposition. I've seen many cases come off of the consent agenda as well because somebody showed up in opposition at the council hearing.

As far as the candidates, I'm not a supporter of either. I do think anybody running for public office should use the word "we" a little more than "I" when they talk.

Marc
Marc

You made the following statement: "Land can't be rezoned without public knowledge."

Have you actually ever attended a city council meeting and paid attention to the proceedings? As a routine order of business the council makes zoning decisions on "consent items" that include ZERO public comment. The issue is discussed among council members and then voted up or down in a matter of a couple of minutes. Sometimes, the council blazes through 25-50 items in a couple of hours or less.

Now, it could be argued that the public is informed because the meetings are recorded, as well as broadcast on radio and limited television, but I guarantee you that 99.999% of our citizens don't have a clue about those zoning changes, and they never will. There is no in-depth discussion, and most of what is discussed is the technical merits of the re-zoning case that befuddles the average citizen.

Perhaps this truly is an issue on which both Scott and Dave should have remained silent. Perhaps it is not germaine to the issues of electing city council members. But, I am not going to cast any ballots based upon a single issue. The difference I see between the two District 3 candidates is that Dave Neumann pretends to be concerned about his constituents while working behind the scenes to enrich major corporations at our expense while Scott Griggs gets involved at the grass roots level to fight for what he believes is right.

Would Scott always be on the right side of every issue? No. Would Scott always make the best decision in every case? No. But, I believe that Scott would do his very best on each issue to make sure that his is well informed, and I believe that he would consult directly with his constituents, and then follow their consensus opinion about where to stand.

Would Dave Neumann ever be on the right side of ANY issue? The jury is still out, but so far there is no sign that would happen. The XTO permit applications for Hensley Field and FM 1382 at Camp Wisdom Road prove that Neumann is more likely to take the side of a major polluter over the health and safety concerns of his constituents, and that shows his true colors. That Neumann supports the Trinity Corridor Project and the Trinity Toll Road Project, even though the US Army Corps of Engineers warned the city, years ago, about the dangers of those projects, makes me question his rationality with regards to fiscal responsibility and protection of his constituents' best interest.

Neumann has already proven that he cares more about corporations and politicans than he does for his constituency. I think it is time for District 3 to give somebody else a chance to represent them, and Scott Griggs may be just what they really need. I lived in District 3 for most of my life, and if I still lived there, then Scott would get my vote.

Snookie Pie
Snookie Pie

Hey, Abuckley...are you really Neumann?You seem to be trying to impress us with your land use knowledge. But, if you really had land use knowledge AND cared about the area, you'd be on rooting for Griggs.

But, I think you are Neumann who is trying to grab a rope before he goes under for the final time.

Rots of luck, Dave.

What's in it for me
What's in it for me

Griggs is the new deal. Griggs Gets it.

He rose up from the crowd of those who work to make the area better for all. He's one of us. Neumann just blew in 4yrs ago backed by Leppert.

I want a councilperson we're proud of. One we boast about, and covet.

I'm tired of councilperson envy whenever I hear about Angela Hunt.

We deserve the best, too. And, we're more groovy than the M-streets!

Dallas Diner
Dallas Diner

Dave Neumann always says he "agonized," right before he says something that involves screwing over his constituency.

Who Ray
Who Ray

It's agonizing......all of the way to the bank........

db
db

Folks like Neumann are going to have a really difficult time without a mayor that can lie, lie, lie.

Snookie Pie
Snookie Pie

Liar-Liar Leppert has left the building.

Neumann should scram, too.

Dallas Diner
Dallas Diner

Uh, have you forgotten Archie and Arthur?

Bettyculbreath
Bettyculbreath

He might say something wrong, where his personal life is concern,Caraway is not going to lie about any City business if he know the truth. Men don't know how to explain my wife,was mad and after me.

Rico
Rico

He (Griggs) said no one in the community was consulted about the plans and the site should be saved for "something really special."

Really? Is the way it works? A landowner should be required to sit on a tract until "something really special" comes along? Special to whom? How long must one wait?

I don't think you learned that crap in law school, unless your law degree came from Costco.

Anon
Anon

No, that's not how it works. But when the city funds the demolition of crappy slum apartments, they've made an investment in the site. Once they've done that, they have the right and obligation to get a return on that investment. Wal Mart would NEVER have spent their own money to tear down those apartments, so without the city's money, Wal Mart would not be interested in that site. Maybe Wal Mart should ultimately end up being able to do whatever they want on that site. But don't pull some bullshit "property owners" right crap. They didn't just go looking for vacant land in the middle of no where.

Rico
Rico

Show me the ordinance, state or federal law that says that when a city demos delapidated buildings the city has a right to "a return on that investment" from someone who later buys that property for a lawful use and purpose. Or is that just more "property owner" rights crap you can't get your head around? There is no law that prevents Walmart, or any other business or individual, from doing exactly what is being proposed for the site in question. Like it or not, and it's clear that you and Texaspainter don't like it, the law protects the rest of us from people like you.

Anonymous
Anonymous

They're called zoning laws, and their authority over the rights of property owners is pretty well established, whether that meshes with your opinion (or mine) on the matter or not. Are you that delusional that you believe being a property owner allows you to do and build whatever you want on your land? It really doesn't.

Edgar
Edgar

I'm with you, Rico. Anon may not think much of property rights, but they're pretty important. They even made it into the Constitution.

I live in NOC, and I think Neumann is a dunce, but it frightens the hell out of me to think that Scott Griggs -- as hip as he and his wife seem in all those Observer features -- is hell-bent on exercising veto power whenever he sees a project that's not cool enough. Sure, I would rather go to Trader Joe's than Aldi, but it's not my choice. The narcissistic hipster generation needs to arrive at the realization that it does not have a right to shape the world in its image. Bike lanes and street improvements are one thing, but what Anon and Texaspainter are proposing verges on Stalinist centralized planning.

Property rights are important, and any attempt to give them short shrift is contemptible. Yes, they are subject to police power. But it is an outright abuse of those police powers to shut down or delay projects because, ultimately, they aren't cool enough. Anything with a funky menu or a bike rack or a dumpster converted into a pool seems to meet muster, but Arkansas-based retailers and natural-gas companies are relegated to the other end of the lunch table. As for gas drilling, Griggs' firm's website touts his experience representing a patent-seeker for a well-completion technology, so he should know damn well that hydraulic fracturing is safe. There were thousands of fracked wells in the Barnett Shale as of five years, and thousands more have been drilled each and every year since. It's a proven technology. For political reasons, he's tapping into disapproval of gas drilling, led primarily by people who equate natural gas drillers with big oil and whose appreciation of Josh Fox's hipsterism overrides common sense.

Incidentally, if Wal-Mart Neighborhood wants to build near Hampton and FWA, it would probably serve a very large portion of the Oak Cliff population well...maybe not me and my fellow lily-white neighbors, but the people I see at all the other stores near Hampton and FWA. (Yes, Hispanics.) Even if his wife is Hispanic, Scott Griggs is very much running on an agenda that tacitly endorses gentrification.

I really wish I could get behind Scott Griggs. He's smart, and I think he could do a lot of good things. But I sure wish he would get the fundamentals right.

Texaspainter
Texaspainter

Oh poor Rico(Dave) don't be hatin on Scott. Let me 'splain it to ya. Instead of flipping over and whoring ourselves to the 'john' with the biggest parts-"WalMart",we should do our homework and research in order to get the best fit for that particular piece of property. The last thing Oak Cliff needs is another discounter. We whored ourselves to Aldi instead of their prettier sister Trader Joe. That's because the Mayor Skeletor, Ron Dastinky, and yourself are whoreing out to WalMart. The same goes for the gas companies. So who has the bigger one, WalMart or the gas companies? Now go wash out yo mouth.

WCGasette
WCGasette

Walmart at that location?? Awful, just awful.

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