Man, That Was Quick: The First Lawsuit Over Super Ticket Snafu at Cowboys Stadium

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On the other side you'll find the 11-page complaint filed yesterday in Dallas federal court titled STEVE SIMMS and MIKE DOLABI, individually and on Behalf of All Others Similarly Situated, vs. JERRAL "JERRY" WAYNE JONES, NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE, DALLAS COWBOYS FOOTBALL CLUB, LTD., JWJ CORPORATION, COWBOYS STADIUM, L.P., COWBOYS STADIUM GP, LLC, and BLUE & SILVER, INC. (It's like a Fiona Apple record.)

Long, familiar story short: Dolabi's a Tarrant County resident who says he's a "Founder" of Cowboys Stadium -- meaning he paid at least $100,000 for a personal seat license, which he thought guaranteed him not only good season tix, but also decent face-value ducats to the Super Bowl. Problem is, says the complaint:
Unfortunately, not all of the ticket holders to Super Bowl XLV got what they bargained for or what was promised to them. Specifically, most of the "Founders" fans, including but not limited to Plaintiff Dolabi, arrived at the stadium on Sunday to discover that Jones and the Cowboys had assigned them to seats with obstructed views and temporary metal fold out chairs, which had been installed in an effort to meet Jones' goal of breaking the attendance record. In addition, almost all of these seats lacked any reasonable view of the stadium's prized "video board," which Defendant Jones and the Cowboys routinely claim is the one of the most unique and best features of Cowboys Stadium.
Simms, from Pennsylvania, was among the 400 stuck without a seat once it became clear (well, to the fans at least -- everyone else knew well ahead of time) that those temporary bleachers were no good. And he's not much interested in the triple-the-face-value refund and the offer of a ticket to the next Super Bowl. Try "more than $5,000,000." The attorneys are out of California and Addison. Dallas Cowboys Ticket Lawsuit over Super Bowl
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11 comments
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Guest
Guest

Bankrupt the Cowboys! Genius!

ObserverArticleCommenter
ObserverArticleCommenter

I don't want to be defend the whiny people & defend lawyers guy, but this lawsuit is worth something. If it's 1,000 people who got screwed times ~$5,000 each, that's 5 million bucks. I also saw in my cursory glance that they made a deceptive trade practices claim which can triple the damages. I don't think 1,000 people got $5,000 of screwing each, but it is a lot of people and it is expensive. This post isn't nearly snarky enough.

Thelawwon
Thelawwon

The lawyer somehow forgot to sue the contractor, Jerry's son, the Arlington fire marshal, and the University of Arkansas. Sloppy! :-)

Mas
Mas

It's a proposed class action with an expected class of more than 100 people, according to the complaint. If the class, in theory, had 400 people, it would equal $12,500 for each person. Not quite as ridiculous considering the traveling expenses, etc., paid for those affected. Even if it doesn't become that large of a class, it doesn't appear to be just two guys hoping to get $5,000,000.

Rooster
Rooster

$1,000 face for the ticket.$1,000 airfare$1,000 hotel room$1,000 meals

All estimates generous, and that still leaves an $8,500 payday, most of which will probably go to the lawyers.

I still think it's ridiculous.

Homeskillett
Homeskillett

I agree, 5 million? That is an absurd amount. Another person looking for thei entitlementdream. Here is some news, do something different and work for it. I would be very disappointed by having my seat yanked, but look at realistic value. Figures a California Dickhead would file the suit.

Clancey
Clancey

There is a local precedent for arbitrarily seizing seats.

Shortly after Jerry bought the team from Bum Bright he decided to add beaucoup more suites. That meant grabbing seats that required bonds be bought when the stadium was built in the early 70's, with bonds and contract that allowed the annual purchase of tickets for those seats. Dallas Court ruled that the Cowboys contracts with season ticket holders let Jerry seize our season tickets on the 40, move us down between the 10 and 20, with no compensation.

And you wonder why we're laughing our rears off as Jerry has it shoved up his ...

Rooster
Rooster

Seriously? $5M for a missed football game? Lawyers.....

Clancey
Clancey

FYI, pro hac vice means the lawyer isn't allowed to practice in Federal Courts in the Northern District of Texas, DFW. They pay a couple hundred, get a local lawyer to sponsor them, come up with a document that they haven't been disbarred lately in California courts, they're allowed to try the case in Dallas.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Simms probably has a better case than Dolabi. The contract he signed to get that seat is so Jerry-friendly that it's absurd. It very specifically says that he should have no expectation of preference for any event aside from regular season Cowboy home games. In practice (so far) they have had first crack at special events like college games and such, but it doesn't mean he has the right to sue because he doesn't like his seat.

Mid City
Mid City

I'd like to see the stadium bondholder contract but I guess it was not included as an exhibit with the complaint.

Maybe Jerry should have stipulated that the superbowl seat might turn out to be a bucket someone pulled out of the janitor's closet so that his loyal stadium bondholders would at least know they would have something to piss in.

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