Is Dallas "Built Out," or Are City and County Officials' Priorities Completely Out of Whack?

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A little more than a week ago, the U.S. Census Bureau revealed that the city of Dallas barely grew between 2000 and 2010 -- by 0.8 percent, to be precise, though Matt Stiles and Emily Ramshaw, the Texas Trib'ers contributing to this morning's New York Times, are generous enough to bump it up to "a paltry 1 percent." Which still puts Dallas's growth 37.6 percentage points behind Fort Worth; 19.4 behind Austin; 15 behind San Antonio. So what gives?

City and county officials tell Stiles and Ramshaw: "The third-largest city in Texas is simply built out." But Not-Mayor Tom "No Trinity Earmarks (Say Wha?)" Leppert says don't you worry your pretty little head about that: "We're bringing a lot of business in, seeing a real resurgence in the downtown area. We've positioned ourselves very well for the future."

The rest of the piece and the folks interviewed for it (including a certain ubiquitous Hilltop prof) don't share the U.S. Senate candidate's optimism:
Critics suggest that Dallas's larger-than-life image may be shrinking for another reason. They say that officials' lack of investment in public schools, streets, parks and pools -- the real-world priorities outside the city's highbrow Arts District, with its cultural monuments designed by the hottest "starchitects" (Norman Foster, Rem Koolhaas, I. M. Pei, Renzo Piano) and soon-to-be sky-high Santiago Calatrava "signature" bridges -- is sending white families and middle-class minorities moving to the suburbs. The result, they say, is an increasingly Hispanic, less educated and poor inner city.

"That means property values are likely to decline, and with property values, tax revenues," said Cal Jillson, a political science professor at Southern Methodist University. "At the end of the day, when a family has to make a choice between living in Dallas, close to its cultural amenities, or having better infrastructure, schools, libraries and pools in the suburbs, they're not going to choose Dallas."
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RJ
RJ

Do your homework folks. 54% of DISD schools are exemplary or recognized. Eight DISD high schools outrank most of the suburban schools based on Newsweek AP and IB rankings.

In East Dallas alone there are four Blue-Ribbon elementary schools.

Check home values in Lakewood and Preston Hollow - they have far exceeded any appreciation in the northern suburbs.

MattL1
MattL1

I live downtown, and I have never once been in the tunnels. I don't like the idea of them, and they probably contribute significantly to the lack of street-level activity in the neighborhood.

More than that, however, I don't like the segregation. One of the most important aspects of living and/or working in a city is that it teaches one to interact with people of all races, creeds, socioeconomic backgrounds, etc. When you have one level for the people who work downtown and another for those of us who live there, it breeds a certain us-vs.-them mentality that is unhealthy for our civic identity. The central business district is designed, in theory, to be a place where everybody in the city can come together. When a certain group has the ability to exclude themselves from that idea, it can't be healthy for the city as a whole.

Bottom line, I want more decent bars.

Dallas Diner
Dallas Diner

What most discourages me is that our elected representatives get in office and do a 180 turn on us. For instance, Laura Miller campaigned and won on a "liveable city" platform of fix the streets, fix the lights, take care of the parks. And then she went to the dark side after her husbund told her it was "stupid" not to support the big ticket items. Well, I guess selling out the people who voted for her get her a high-paid lobbying job, but the rest of us are still dodging the potholes.

Johnnyindallas
Johnnyindallas

There has been a lot of tear downs of apartment complexes in Dallas the past few years. In Lake Highlands off of Skillman and Walnut Hill, there was a lot of apartments torn down to make room for the Lake Highlands Town Center that has not been built yet. Also the area on between Greenville Ave and Skillman from Northwest Highway to Park Lane has had lots of apartment that have been torn down to make room for the Park Lane Shopping Center. I live near Greenville and University and there have been a lot of tear downs that were going to be redeveloped, but the economy crashed and nothing has been rebuilt. The one thing I can say is that most of the tear downs were low income units that were occupied buy families with young childern. Now more people are moving in are single and married people with no childern. When the economy recovers I believe that more developement with start. At least that's what I see in the Greenville/Lovers area.

Bill Holston
Bill Holston

Dallas:Last weekend, I met a friend, a lawyer from DC. at Stir Coffee, the spot inside Good 2 Go Taco.The deck was full of people, kids dogs. We had excellent 'direct trade coffee.' My friend said, I love this place, I can't believe how much cooler Dallas is than it used to be. Later that night, Jill and I went to see Singapore Slingers at Kristy Krueger at the Kessler. Of course that morning, I went hiking at Spring Creek Forest, saw hawks and wood ducks.

I get the points about large projects such as designer bridges and convention hotels, and I'd dearly love us to spend more on natural areas and parks, but there's much here in Dallas to enjoy. If you don't see that, you're not paying attention.

I agree with others who say, the problems with education continue to be a real poor mark on our city, and that's getting worse not better.

Dallas Diner
Dallas Diner

What discourages me about Dallas is that it is that since the influential people are developers, it is all about building the next big thing, not keeping what we have in good repair. So the streets to the shiny new bridge and hotel are riddled with potholes and lined with broken streetlights. We have shiny new schools that are understaffed and have inadequate resources. We build a new hospital, but don't have the money to keep it in good order. Basically, the government of the city and the county operate like a procession of army ants, eating what's in front of it and leaving devastation in its wake.

master c
master c

Whew love this. I had to move back to Dallas after living in Houston for 14 yrs, if you say H-town sucks, you just dont know. I know Austin is the queen city and I am fucking sick of hearing about it. What I tell people is nobody WANTS to live in Dallas-sometimes you have to. I will say it is easy and cheap here, but my friends in this town are all I have to recommend it. Ive got people coming in town next week, what will we do to show them Dallas? Probably go to Fort Worth.

cp
cp

You are lazy.

Ex-Dallasite
Ex-Dallasite

Who cares? The whole metroplex is a $hithole--burbs included. Leaving it was among the best decisions I've ever made.

cp
cp

And yet it mystifies that you continue to read Unfair Park from afar.

MattL1
MattL1

There's no bloody way that I'm reading all of these comments. Suffice it to say, however, that I agree with about half of you.

Texaspainter
Texaspainter

Hey Robert: here's a story idea related to this very topic. Let's find out from Dallas City Hall how many city employees actually live in Dallas. That's the Dallas dirty little secret. I think about 65% of the employees live outside Dallas. The last I heard the city payroll was 13,000 people. More people = more revenue. There are high ranking city administrators who don't even live here in Dallas but in other towns. How pitiful is that?

Harv
Harv

Sorry TXPainter, I can't afford it and I like to feel somewhat safe stepping outside my house once in a while. Maybe if gas goes up to $5 a gallon, I might have to change my strategy, move in, and arm myself.

Enrique De La Fuente
Enrique De La Fuente

Maybe if you did a better job along with all your other colleagues, you would not have to.

Bigjondaniel
Bigjondaniel

The ONLY thing that makes Dallas livable is what it is not. It is not OKC. It is not in Western Kansas. It is not Midland. It is not as expensive as the places that people would mostly choose to live, if they could.

We are fooling ourselves if we think Dallas will ever get any better. There is no way it could. The truth hurts, but there it is.

I look around, and I try to understand the people who say they "Love" it here. I wonder where they have been in their lives to make that judgment? And then it hits me.

Dallas is full of people who are here becuase they HAVE to be, not becuase they WANT to be.

They have to be here to make a livingThey have to be here to be near family

Have you ever told anyone you live in Dallas, and had the response be:Oh - cool!Oh - You are so lucky!

NO way!

DFW has some HUGE problems in this regards!

Take a poll of the high school seniors, even in the rich burbs. How many of them want to go off to college (umm - yahhh - no Universities in the area attracting top notch talent that will stay) and come back here?

You will be shocked.

AND here is the real kick in the ass. The real amazing irony. The real "oh shit" moment for all of you.

Just take a look at the big money people in Dallas. You know how many of them live here all year around??

Fucking NONE!

They have houses in Aspen, or LaJolla. They have apartments in NYC.

Need more proof? Just read Candace Evens blog about 2nd homes, pointed at the very people who are supposedly investing in the city! It's just more proof that once someone gets a little money, they a bailing the fuck out!

So it is true that DFW is attracting people and creating jobs,at least in the burbs,. But I can assure you, these people HATE IT HERE. And given a chance to bail out, they will. Just like the rich folks in HP do.

Dallas people, do not confuse the forces of the supply and demand with actual attractiveness.

Dallas is actually the ugly girl/boy with no personality that you date until something better comes along

scottindallas
scottindallas

Have you ever told anyone you live in Dallas, and had the response be:Oh - cool!Oh - You are so lucky!

Actually, many many people say this, they live in OK, Abilene, or the boondocks.

Daniel
Daniel

Ouch. To (mis?)quote David St. Hubbins, that's a little too fucking much perspective, isn't it?

Montemalone
Montemalone

Yep.

cp
cp

You're confusing Dallas: the City with Dallas: the Metro. The article is about Dallas: the City, and not DFW. People are coming into DFW in droves; not so much in Dallas. Pay attention. I think I hear your bell ringing....

Bob Loblaw
Bob Loblaw

We Dallas-residents are self-haters. I've lived in the City for 25 years and it's far better than it ever has been. I have two kids getting an excellent education at DISD. The schools are perfectly safe, adequately funded and everyone we've met at the schools is competent, skilled, and involved (yes, really). There are things in the City that could be better and we must always debate priorities,--but I have never, ever, even for a moment, considered moving to a suburb. And I never will.

cp
cp

Tell me, what part of Dallas? South Oak Cliff? Fair Park area? Vickery Meadow? Denton Drive?

Cesare
Cesare

Damn, Big “D”? I thought we had something going. I have written how great Dallas is in the numbers of people arriving here on a daily basis. At one point it was, I believe, and this is not a quote, but around 750 people daily. That was not inspired by the amount of people leaving Dallas at the time from what I recall. Either way, it’s a great number, trust me. That was 4 years ago when I was writing about a home building company. I even had input that the Dallas economy was so great by the fact that there are so many cranes in downtown Dallas as well. I have always considered Robert Wilonsky, the author of this blog, a pretty reliable source with most articles that he writes and his blog is considered pretty decent insight for normal conservative business types like myself, that care how I impact my community as well as the concerns of my own families well being. I had stated years ago on a flight to a builders convention with some relatives, that to buy real estate in Oak Cliff, would be great due to the Trinity River Project. Yes, absolutely at the time, but has Dallas become the “business” in the fact that they are a city to keep marching on, and things will get better? Are we really taking into account what is going on around the country, the world and beyond. After all, we have had a mayor, who now wants to be a Senator. Maybe he has been working on other things rather than the responsibility of as many families that are in the great city of Dallas. Maybe, it’s not just about you and yours, Tom. Maybe all the people in politics should start what they finish once in office so that we can get a whole broad perspective of start-almost middle-middle-almost end-and end. Then we can evaluate you and yours.The reason to expand and to add things that are desireable is if you have that kind of development and to retain folks. Austin, San Antonio, and an even larger rise in the Fort Worth population, has made Dallas’ a true question mark of, “Why are we still building up?” Is it because we are just staying on schedule?Also, the perspective given by the professor at SMU is probably one of the more “lame” statements I have heard recently. He must have found some similarities elsewhere and reinstated and applied that. Way to go SMU. There are some very resilient people that love their surroundings whether that being race, mountains, lakes, or restaurants and bars that are worth their cultural feel, as well as going to see classical arts like Romeo and Juliet at the Winspear Opera House for Valentine’s Day, and falling asleep in each others arms without having to drive too far from the opera house to home. If there is too much emphasis on glam instead of education in Dallas this article has some insight. Education makes a society stronger and the lack of this in a culture is such a disappointment. I want my own children to go to public school, but with new news I really am thinking differently. I’m glad I am able to see different things coming up in my life and I have the ability to process without a knee jerk reaction, but just a digestive thought instead. This is my personal take as a father. As a business man I think that it would be wise for every city, county and state to do some tight forensic accounting, to find what it is that we truly need to cut and what it is that we absolutely want to promote. This article has stirred various things for me. I have a lot of interest in real estate, civil service and the growth of a city, (especially architecturally) and I identify with this article in all of those senses. Oh, and by the way. Richardson is a great suburb of Dallas. You can take your Plano, Frisco, Allen and the rest of that all you want. Good luck. I know those unimaginative areas very well. Eh! Peace and Love, Peace and Love.

Nuancey Asseta
Nuancey Asseta

Ha ~ yes, that's why people aren't moving to Dallas ~ it's because we don't have enough parks, designer bridges or "starchitectual" monuments. Yes, that's exactly it. I've got a great idea; let's build a HUGE chrome park... over the highway.. yes, that will fix EVERYTHING & finally make people move to downtown! (Still the same guys running this game right?) (we should make them all listen to Supertramp and meander around the streets of what was Deep Ellum, an artist community.. who sucked out the feelin'? :( ~ :) I've never seen a city attempt to turn itself into some freakish revertion of something comparable to suburban life.. after watching this rennovation and forced high-dollar 'rejuvanation' of its core, at this point, Dallas' continual conversion and myopically tenacious, "head-to-a-100-year-old-brick-wall-without-alteration," "Built-it-and-they-will-be-impressed-and-come" hit-after-hit new-money, new-city quick cheap decor still lacks totally in overall presentation, cohesion, charm and cultural appeal . Now days, I just shake my head cuz it's just comical (until the whitties get pissy and start spouting off at minorities and poor people like a bunch of rednecks.. then it gets kinda real and not so much fun anymore) sad examples of lack of democracy, creativity, and especially lack of a sincere broad-minded and very considerate & entertaining connection with its own people, assets, talent and culture- the innate jewels that make up its own unique culture in it's present state. I have no doubt (against some odds & for some unknown reason) that people would and will still move to downtown, especially with new rail options in place and mobile connectivity on the rise. People move to downtown for 3 reasons: work, entertainment-factor or "citylife", or cost-of-living. In some cases, downtown can actually be found to be more affordable than living in uptown. Depends on the market that quarter ~ The greatest, most progressive, fun-loving and sustainable cities are the ones that EMBRACE DIVERSITY, it's own indigineous diversity, rather than trying to keep the kids quiet, the bums off the street and the piss off the atm machines. Well, a thriving inner-city is next to just overall demand. Certainly no companies have relocated to downtown to be able to have much affect on vacancy. I've lived here 7 years now and I've always felt like Dallas was a jewel, you just had to digg deep and find what you were looking for (being sure to give back to the community in your own way:) I've had experiences here that I have to admit were next to none.. but I always felt like overall the movement of the people here is awkward & disjointed in many aspects, calous often, and as far as an overall theme that WORKS to build progressively and draw attention and residents into downtown. The idea/end result or direction comes across to me often as a conditioned "rich bitch's night out" feeling ultimately at best. I've read many other bloggers with the same sentiments towards Dallas over and over and over; I come away feeling as empty as the 100 year old vacant brick stories that whisper to be put to best use. A city with it's back against itself- certainly coming across as impersonal many times, forcing, building, giving a chosen few's best effort at perpetuating an overall culture absent of promoting & building each other up, you know, like good communities do... I can't tell you how many times I've been downtown and not only do you have to search for a decent place to... do anything, sit, shop, date, dance, hear music.. anything.. not only is the entertainment factor very, very low generally speaking - very low - but I find that many times when I go out, I hardly ever even meet any new people. I guess I've been living here long enough to where I just got used to it. The solitude I experience when 'out' in public in Dallas is not the norm in some other cities I've visited or lived in. Why go out if not to meet new people? I don't know; you tell me Dallas~ (or you can stay there in your circle & I'll stay over here in mine;)

Dallas has just made that lasting impression with me. Dallas is brilliant and attractive with world-wide appeal, but the fierceness of the last half century has been smoothered or diluted completely by new money cheap decor, dumb & constraining quick legislation that inhibits Dallasites and raises the overall cost of living in downtown, and just general lack of direction, appeal, connection, proper exploitation, promotion and marketing. It seems like leadership is continually focused on "sales" and setting up quick images or reflections of some lofty, totally unrepresented downtown Dallas 'lifestyle' that just isn't there & isn't being researched, fostered or funded, so this article really made me laugh. "Oh, we never though about 'geography'.. oh well, let's keep spending $ and building residential!" It's not working. The "quick-sale" of new apartment & residential ideas does not equate "insta-culture".. sorry investors (like they care:)

Funny thing is the crime rate downtown is actually decent. Yes, sadly, Dallas is just that lame, but if you throw a bad party..nobody will come. If you arrest, fine and/or ticket everyone who comes to your party, they probably will leave. Oh, and if everyone's wearing jeans or those stupid dresses that fit like trash bags, it's not becoming. Ah, the entertainment factor. There is wonderful music everywhere yet somehow Dallas still clings to the old ballad with very little fresh ever going into the main stream. The inner-city who attracts those who enjoy fast life and quick appeal, large populations and diverse cultural assortments. When people consider moving to inner-city for cultural reasons, it seems they might be searching for some muse or source of inspiration from living in the middle of it.

I don't feel like many of the new parks and sculptures and other "city bling" that has been the recent trend and installations has carried over into making any area seem more exclusive (with the acception of the Art District I guess), and please no more chrome- it's hot as the Dickens in Dallas like 70% of the time, and chrome is kind of heat-condusive so...

Seems like no one is encompassing enough to 'pull it off,' but I have to admit, I still hold a light for Dallas & DFW is still not a hot city metroplex, but rather just the capital of East & West Texas;) The city of Dallas is like that innocent girl you dated in high school ~ that sweet hispanic transvestite who wanted to run for homecoming queen:) (I still love the idea of outlining Dalllas' skyline with the colors of the rainbow.. I think that 'might' draw some int'l attention:) and I think the green building is positioned correctly I believe for this to happen.. haha~ and, well, statistically speaking.. Dallas is a pretty gay city. just sayin' ~

Oak Cliff Townie
Oak Cliff Townie

The truth can now be told !

Dallas actually Grew by XXX,XXX.This went unnoticed because of the 250,000 Anti Census folks who threw away the forms and to this day are refusing to answer the door.

Joey G. Dauben
Joey G. Dauben

All I have to say is that I don't want to ever see another City of Dallas corporate city limits map that shows it snaking its way south into Ellis County (like they had in the 90s), and if by "over the county line" they mean annexing their boundaries past Dallas County, I just hope I'm the mayor of Palmer (position I'm running for currently) so I can stand up against it. The 90s maps that I saw showed Dallas' city limits filtering on the eastern swath of I-45 towards Ennis.

Who Ray
Who Ray

Do you mean to tell me that leaky levees, Calatrava Bridges, Convention Center Hotel, 14 Brand Spankin' new Walmart stores, etc. are not things that would convince people to move their families to Dallas? Wow, I'm shocked!

Tim
Tim

If you are over the ago of thirty and have a family and move to the area, a few things are constant. 1. You probably work off of the North Dallas Tollway, Frisco, or Plano. 2. Because a new home in these suburbs is cheap, the roads are awesome, the crime is low and the schools are ridiculously better you probably live in Frisco, Allen, or Grapevine. Dallas has become a joke.

John_McKee
John_McKee

"We're bringing a lot of business in" so encapsulates Republican policy.

Yes, Texas is fabulous place to do business. Dallas is apparently such an attractive place to do business that Tom was able to move Turner Construction and all one of their executives here to do business. Dallas will gladly hand you all sorts of tax breaks to do business here. Here's a free iPhone company that isn't considering moving to Dallas, that's how great Dallas is for business, we give you free iPhones just because you are a big business, that's how much we like businesses in Dallas.

I don't doubt Tom did everything possible to make Dallas great for business, my question is, what did he do to make Dallas great for it's citizens because those people employed by said business have no obligation to live in Dallas.

I understand that a city like Dallas needs to be friendly to big business but it shouldn't always be at the expense of the quality of life of the citizens of the city and that is the approach Tom has taken here.

TimCov
TimCov

And, businesses that pay attention don't move to Dallas because of these things. Boeing chose not to move to Dallas because they could see the writing on the walls. If a company moves its headquarters to the Dallas area, they still don't move it to Dallas. They move it to a location close to where the executives can get homes they like with schools that their junior executives won't have a problem sending their kids to. I worked at a corporate headquarters that had recently moved to for north Plano (almost Frisco) from a northern state. My boss told me that one of the reasons they chose to move there instead of Dallas was exactly these reasons. Then you throw in the embarrassing things politicians in Dallas (city and county) do, and there is no way they would move any closer to Dallas.

Anon
Anon

The saddest part is the current crop of mayoral candidates all grew up in the era of the typewriter, not the personal computer. Until the Dallas Citizens' Council realizes that Dallas needs a face that represents a new, young, vibrant city, no one is going to take us seriously.

Snookie Pie
Snookie Pie

Rather than ask the Citizen’s Council (evil doers), I’d prefer the voters/taxpayers select the Mayor.

This time around, we won't let the CC put their man, Rawlings, in office.

I plan to vote early and vote often to ensure we do not end up with Rawlings in office.

And, I will be casting all my votes for David Kunkle for Mayor.

Candace Evans
Candace Evans

@TimCov: We also bought land near Austin, but I'm not ready to leave. There are an abundance of second home properties in Austin and west of Austin towards Fredericksburg -- they may become full time residences. (Hence the inspiration for my new blog.) The quality of life is excellent. I'm working on a piece for New Geography/Forbes.com on the fantastic growth of Marble Falls. I think sometimes we in Dallas don't look elsewhere for inspiration. This census should be a wake-up call.

scottindallas
scottindallas

Yes, that's all Dallas needs, spring fed rivers, hills, and a rural in-bred citizenry. Not really a fair comparison.

Montemalone
Montemalone

You people don't get it. Dallas exists to serve the needs of HP/UP. That's why we have Arts Districts (places for billionaires to put their names on buildings and mingle with one another), Deck Parks (cause who wants to drive over a moat of a freeway to get to the Arts District, much better to have some trees), Convention Center Hotels (so the billionaires have someplace to buy muni bonds, guaranteed to be paid back with Dallas tax dollars) and Calatrava Bridges (even though none of the HP/UP crowd will ever cross it, if it ever connects to either side, cause why in the world would they want to go to West Dallas?). On the plus side, these projects also allow for land speculators to make huge profits.

Jay Hawk
Jay Hawk

Exactly - all of Mayor Leppert's moves were controlled by people who can't vote for him but benefit from all the money that's poured into the Arts District and other development projects.

scottindallas
scottindallas

Jay, I think you don't get how/or what votes count. Those at the ballot box aren't the ones that count.

Snookie Pie
Snookie Pie

Whoever you are, Montemalone, you are GOD in my book. You always say it just so perfectly.

Hit this one home.

TimCov
TimCov

Add my wife and to the list of people who will be leaving Dallas county. We've grown sick of the idiotic politicians who are re-elected after making fools of themselves and making the county look like a bottomless pit of ignorance.

We are saving up our money, and will be moving to the Austin area. At least Austin has some great natural scenery.

urban fellow
urban fellow

Don't be too fooled by Austin. Their schools aren't in much better shape. Sure, there are 3 or so decent high schools in Anderson, Austin High and Bowie. But the others don't look all that different from Dallas. Ever heard of Johnston High School? It was reconstituted. Or stabbings at Reagan? Sure, it's prettier and there's always 6th street for tourists, but it ain't always the place you think it is.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

Until recently, our plan was to add on a little bit, maybe put in a small pool, etc. since our children attend excellent private high schools and we don't want to move them. We love our neighborhood and our jobs. We've been happy here.

But lately we have come to realize that, thanks to DISD, our home will only appreciate so much. People can't afford expensive homes and private school tuition. Since DISD caps any return on investment, developers have little interest in rehabbing blighted neighborhoods. People with children who can't afford tuition will not invest within DISD boundaries. The blight spreads like a virus.

No one in city leadership seems to get the connection between schools and blight. The lack of blight in HP isn't bc the people are rich, it's bc the schools are good and people get rich from the appreciation on their homes.

And then there's city govt. We're taxed and taxed for dwindling services and surly city staffers. Every single thing is filtered through race.

Along your lines, our new plan is to get the kids through high school, cash out what we can from our home, and move somewhere small, sane, and at least a little bit scenic.

The fancy bridge does nothing for us, so we, in turn, can do nothing for the people (and their families) we would otherwise employ to design and remodel our home.

Dallas just doesn't make financial sense anymore. Thus the growth of any place with decent schools; almost everyone would rather spend their money on a nice home with pool and not on private school tuition.

scottindallas
scottindallas

I'm sorry DISD teacher, your comments about the differences between HP and Dallas is naive. For a teacher to be so ignorant about the costs and challenges that DISD faces relative to HP is shocking. I wouldn't want my kids going to any school where you teach. I certainly hope you don't teach beyond 3rd grade.

Consider the relative burden of special needs, bilingual classes and a host of challenges that DISD must account for that HP doesn't. Think about absolute numbers, both the numbers of students and the per household taxes that each district would glean.

scottindallas
scottindallas

How, with your inside information were you not smart enough to know that DISD is the weakest district in the city? That undercuts any comments you'd offer.

I live in Dallas, and in the RISD. My home value has increased 35% over the last 5-6 years. I love my part of Dallas, East Dallas has lots of charm, lakes, creeks, parks and hills. We don't get the greatest development, but we ain't too far.

Actually, these doom and gloom predictions are overblown, especially when comparing Dallas to the Suburbs. They will face rising taxes and vastly increased social spending as those burbs mature. I agree with the sentiments of the article though they are a bit hyperbolic and overblown.

Enrique De La Fuente
Enrique De La Fuente

Seriously, DISD Teacher?

You know plenty of people who got rich from selling their homes in HP? They were rich to begin with.

scottindallas
scottindallas

Or they have 40 years of ownership they're cashing in on. She not a the sharpest knife in the drawer.

Candace Evans
Candace Evans

Can you contact me for an interview? Candace@secondshelters.com.

Enrique De La Fuente
Enrique De La Fuente

Actually the schools in HP are good because the people are rich. Rich families are more likely to be less difficult to educate.

Nobody gets rich from home appreciation.

rubbercow
rubbercow

DISD - You have to consider the very real fact that many of the people in the lower income areas do not want their home values to increase; there are many people on my street who have been vocal about the fact that our improvements are "just going to make taxes go up." Many of these folks are not thinking beyond next week (and even that would be considered long-term planning). If you see things differently than they do you are simply a racist or an arrogant white person or gentry.

DISD Teacher
DISD Teacher

You're wrong.I can't count the number of people I know and am related to who made hundreds of thousands of dollars profit from selling their homes in HP.Maybe you don't consider that rich, but I do. It isn't Kennedy rich, of course.Most invested the income in bigger homes and business ventures, which in turn yielded income and profit.

The schools in HP are good bc their school board doesn't rip off the families to enrich themselves. Decisions aren't race-based. Practically zero construction contracts are awarded.

Just because kids are poor doesn't mean they're stupid. My DISD kids are incredibly bright. The problem in DISD is behavior-related. With a decent school board, those kids could have their issues addressed on separate campuses, which would improve the neighborhood schools, home values, and quality of life for all the families working multiple jobs to pay private school tuition.

DISD is what is killing Dallas.Only a school board member would disagree.

Candace Evans
Candace Evans

No they have issues, too, that are brought about by money. But generally, yes, you have parents with more time to devote to parenting and building the schools.

Candace Evans
Candace Evans

Check out this story on the top 20 most miserable cities in the USA: http://www.secondshelters.com/...Thank God Dallas not one of them, yet. We have issues, yet we have so much potential. @Erik -- isn't what you are describing just a natural cycle? I think downtown Dallas has a long ways to go; downtown Fort Worth has always had a better lay-out and infrastructure thanks to the Bass Bros. We are catching up with our arts district/park etc. But that's catching up. And just because you have a district with a high Latino population doesn't mean it has to fail. Latinos have large, close-knit families and want their children to succeed. One friend I know actually sent her daughter back to South America for high school because of the negative influence of the gangs etc in Irving. (They were pushing her 14 year old daughter to smoke and lose her virginity.) So those suburbs are not all perfection. I think we need more private and parochial schools around the area. You gt some great private schools south of the Trinity, watch what happens.

Bigjondaniel
Bigjondaniel

Candace, you represent a lot of what I hate about Dallas! The racism, clueless anti-intellectualism, boosterism, and just basic stupidity. Please keep posting, becuase every word you write changes my economic pain point for getting the fuck of this place

Enrique De La Fuente
Enrique De La Fuente

Translate = Check out my website. You know its bad when former D employees are trolling with the rest of on UP.

Robert Wilonsky
Robert Wilonsky

Now, now. Be nice to Candy. She's a good Friend of Unfair Park.

Candace Evans
Candace Evans

Really Enrique? Why is it bad? UP actually publishes some of the best info in the city. This is a topic very near to me, as I wrote on it for both AOL Real Estate and New Geography. And now that you've mentioned it, yes, check out my site and keep the discussion going. Because I will be writing a whole lot more!

Bigjondaniel
Bigjondaniel

Candace - you just missed the UnfairPark record for pumping ones own shitty blog by one pump! Try harder!

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