Neighbor Called 911 On Pit Bulls Prior To Friday Morning Attack in M Streets

Categories: City Hall, News
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Late Friday afternoon, while we were still sifting through those comments for and against pit bulls (and their owners), Unfair Park HQ received a call from Jill Urban, who said she called 911 on those two "un-collared" pit bulls in the M Streets area some 20 minutes or more before the two dogs spent 10 minutes attacking a 63-year-old man who was out on his morning stroll.

The attack occurred at approximately 6:30 a.m., but Urban, who lives just four blocks away from where the incident occurred, told us she was "positive" it was 6:10 when she'd first called 911 to report a run-in with the very same loose pit bulls. Urban had been jogging with two other women at the time.

The 911 dispatcher immediately transferred Urban to Dallas Animal Services. Then DAS created a "standard priority" service request at 6:15 a.m. for the 6100 block of Marquita that indicated that two pit bulls were "roaming Tietze Park area," a park where children often play unattended.

"They took my information, and gave me a complaint number, and that was it," Urban told us.

Over the weekend, we received confirmation from the city of Dallas that Urban's story was accurate, but because the dogs weren't deemed to be "aggressive" when they were first called in, no attempt was made to capture the dogs until after police and fire dispatch called the dogs in at 6:44 a.m. Only after the attack had already been called into 911 was an "Emergency" ticket was created to deal with the dogs.

There was no activity on the ticket between 6:17 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. when the ticket was "closed" citing this explanation: "the k9's in question have been impounded earlier today 7/23/10."

While the dogs weren't being "aggressive," Urban told Unfair Park that the she was "bothered by their behavior enough to call 911 as soon as I got home." Urban told us that the pair of pit bulls followed the trio for several blocks along a route that they regularly run, and that she made that clear when she called 911.

When we heard back from Frank Librio, spokesman for the city, about the calls and the reasons for their priority rankings, he wrote that the first service request "was not dispatched because it was coded as 'loose dogs.' Loose dog calls are not dispatched. Animal Services queries the calls and assigns them to area officers to handle."

About the second call, he wrote that it was "received by dispatch at 6:44 a.m. and was coded as 'loose aggressive.' Officers arrived at 7:04 a.m. and impounded the dogs. Loose aggressive calls are a priority."

Friday evening after receiving numerous stitches, the 63-year-old man was released from Baylor. Identified by other local media outlets as Dost Aryan (on Friday he'd asked WFAA not to be identified, but NBCDFW.com and now WFAA reports are including his name), the man spent more than five hour in the hospital.

One witness to the attack, David Cunniff (who Jim points out is not a stranger to violence) said the attack lasted approximately 10 minutes.

"Ten minutes of terror" John McCaa called it on Friday evening's broadcast.  Also worth watching for footage of one of the dogs gnawing at its cages, as well as some pretty stark footage of Aryan arriving home practically mummified in bandages.

This afternoon, we heard back from Librio, who wrote clarifying DAS policy on loose dogs (pit bull or not): "If a dog is loose and acting aggressive or threatening someone Dallas Animal Services responds immediately if notified."

Also, he said that DAS has been unsuccessful in locating the dog's owners, which are required to be held 13 days from time of capture. But if an owner can't be identified then the dogs will be put to sleep.

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