5 Art Exhibitions Events in Dallas to Attend This Weekend

Categories: Visual Art

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Dallas Medianale

There's not much in your way of typical exhibition openings, so you'll only see one of those on this list. If you're looking to get your art fix you'll have to be a bit more adventurous. Check out one of these five events to attend. We lead off with one recommended by Caroline North, who's been covering the Dallas Medianale during its inaugural run.

Dallas Medianale Finale: Existential Virtuality
It's almost time for Porky Pig, but not quite: There's one last Dallas Medianale event for your viewing pleasure. Carolyn Sortor has put together a closing program of seated screenings called "Existential Virtuality" for the experimental film festival and it starts at 5:45 p.m. Saturday at the McKinney Avenue Contemporary (3120 McKinney Ave.). The evening will begin with a compilation screening, "Death, Desire + Commerce in 5-D," with a longer, 30-minute screening of My Barbarian following at 7:15 p.m. The compilation will repeat at 8:15 p.m., so you're set if you can't make it there early. There's also an after party to look forward to, the location of which will be disclosed at the event. Show up to say goodbye -- for now -- to one of the coolest things to happen in Dallas in recent memory. And don't be shy if this is your first Medianale event; at the very least it will give you a taste of what to expect from the Video Association of Dallas when they bring back Medianale and offer other awesome programming in the future. Admission is free, but make sure to RSVP to guarantee your spot. More info at videofest.org. - Caroline North


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Francisco Moreno Reconstructs a 1975 Datsun Z In the Name of Art and All That Is Cool

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Francisco Moreno
It's more than just doing donuts in front of a painting, but it's also that.

It's 4 p.m. on a Wednesday and I'm climbing into the body of a 1975 Datsun Z, receiving instructions that amount to "flip this switch and jiggle that one" with the warning that "just know, it will actually be quite startling." I'm sitting on a false seat in the driver's seat, when the entire car shudders and it lets out an enormous roar. I squeal. You would too.

This car, which is being built from scratch, is part of artist Francisco Moreno's WCD Project, part of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra's inaugural Soluna Festival in May. For the past few years, Moreno has been constructing the car as part of a performative installation that is a variation on the famous painting, "Washington Crossing the Delaware" by Emmanuel Luetze.

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Artist Vincent Falsetta's Denton Exhibit Is a Study in Thoughtful, Fastidious Chaos

Categories: Visual Art

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Vincent Falsetta

"I wanted to have a group show with myself at different stages of my career," explains Vincent Falsetta, as we walk through Agendas -- Several Decades of Painting, on display at UNT on the Square in Denton.

He hesitates to call the show a retrospective, although in many ways that's what it is, because for each of the 15 paintings in the gallery there are rooms filled with variations on the style. But here in the space next to paintings as recent as 2014, his work from 1975 feels just as fresh as it probably felt then. There's no chronology to the paintings on display, letting each work ricochet off the others in an atemporal conversation about an artist and his progress.


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5 Art Exhibitions to See This Weekend

Categories: Visual Art

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Conduit Gallery

Stephen Lapthisophon, Jeff Gibbons, Vincent Ramos
Conduit Gallery presents exhibitions by three artists who couldn't be more different. Stephen Lapthisophon is one of Dallas' veteran artists, who incorporates surprising materials into his work on canvas, including spices, coffee grounds, or pigmented animal fats. Concurrently there will be an exhibition by intermedia artist Jeff Gibbons, who has had an incredible start to 2015, as he is part of a two person exhibition at Goss-Michael Foundation. Gibbons creates work that is often hard to describe, seemingly interested as much in philosophy as the act of creation. The third artist on display is Vincent Ramos, who has created two series of drawings and collages that explore the current immigration debate, class and race issues in America. Promises to be an engaging night of art. See it from 6-8 p.m. Saturday.

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Melvin Edwards on Sculpture: 'It's Like Making a Baby.'

Categories: Visual Art

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Nasher Sculpture Center

Five decades is likely more than half a life. That's more than 18 thousand days and nearly a half-million hours. It's a long time to live. It's a long time to be creating art. To see an artist's work spanning 50 years is to stand in the presence of mastery; it is to see a life's meditations, trials, and triumphs naked on the walls for your perusal. In the case of Melvin Edwards: Five Decades at the Nasher Sculpture Center, it's a challenge to the viewer and a privilege to stand so close to the intricate, powerful work by one of America's greatest living sculptors.

The exhibition, curated with a visible dedication to Edwards' craft by Catherine Craft, offers both a seasoned and new viewer insight into his work. With his famous small-scale, sculptural reliefs, known as "Lynch Fragments," focused in one room, but present throughout the show's three main spaces, the work flows in continuous development and redevelopment. This is no tidy package containing a chronological Edwards, but a rich continuum of ideas flowing into and out of one another like an improv jazz piece, with a harmonic through-line singing of the sculptor's medium: steel.

"I approach all my ideas over and over again. It's not like my life is 1 years old, 2, 3, 4 to 74, I mean that's how you live it, but not the ideas," says Edwards, as we walk through the exhibition. "I may go back to something that was developed in 1970. I did that just last year actually, finally constructing a barbed wire piece I drew in the 70's."


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Nobody's Afraid of Chuck & George. Plus, Lauren's First Artwork!

Categories: Visual Art

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CentralTrak

Two of the most beloved characters in the Dallas art scene are known together collaboratively as Chuck & George, in daily life as "The Brians" or individually as Brian Keith Jones and Brian Scott. For more than two decades, these two have been working together or in tandem on art that embraces styles cartoonish and lowbrow, but always with a self-deprecating sense of humor. They make Dallas a lively place to live and work for their fellow artists, which might be the basis for this weekend's homage exhibition at Central Trak. Think of it as a visual roast of the artists.

Look, I even made them a picture.


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5 Art Exhibitions to See this Weekend

Categories: Visual Art

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For the Love of Kettle
A lot of people love Kettle Art Gallery. This Deep Ellum staple run by artist Frank Campagna and his partner, Paula Harris, is a haven of emerging and established Dallas artists whose work varies from painting to photography to the phallic sculpture garden I saw there one time. It's a place for first time buyers or local-centric collectors and with price points that start well below $100. And this weekend, the artists and any curious gallery-hopper pay respects to the gallery with a fundraiser of sorts. Around 7 p.m. Saturday, you'll see Kettle Art stuffed to the capacity, with everyone sipping beer and chattering loudly at the annual For the Love of Kettle.The gallery will be filled with more than 120, 9 x 12 works available for just $50 each, created by artists who show at Kettle or just want to love on the space. The chaos of the event is sure to be fun. More at kettleart.com.

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3D Printing Company to Open Retail Location in Frisco

Categories: Tech, Visual Art

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Captured Dimensions
In 2013, we profiled 3D printing company Captured Dimensions, a Richardson-based company whose goal is to provide people with a futuristic way of making memories. And their technology has only gotten better. Now, the company uses more than 80 DSLR cameras arranged in a 360 degree array to take a super hi-res photo of a person, pet or object from almost every angle imaginable and then create a miniature version using a brand new, production-grade sandstone printer.

To shrink themselves into statues, it used to be that customers would visit Captured Dimensions' nondescript, warehouse-like offices in Richardson to have their photo taken and a print made. The offices served not just as a studio, but as a storage and work facility. But Thursday, the company will open their first retail location in Frisco under the name PhotoSculpt. "The hope for the store is to turn the experience into a more family-friendly one and to offer a more streamlined experience for people wanting to 3D print their loved ones," says company CEO and co-founder Jordan Williams.

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5 Art Exhibitions to See this Weekend

Categories: Visual Art

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Nasher Sculpture Center

Melvin Edwards: Five Decades
Melvin Edwards has spent the last five decades working in steel. His most famous body of work is a series of small, steel reliefs titled "Lynch Fragments." These 3-dimensional pieces, which Edwards has been making for much of his career, aren't overwhelming in size, but carry a powerful presence. These pieces will be displayed alongside his larger pieces and installations. It may sound redundant, but his work can only be fully realized in person. He's been declared one of America's greatest sculptors. See it from 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday or through May 10. Admission to the Nasher is $10. He'll be discussing his work as part of the Nasher 360 Series at 2 p.m. RSVP for that here.

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Loris Gréaud and What He Didn't Create for His Art Exhibition

Categories: Visual Art

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Courtesy Dallas Contemporary

Last Friday afternoon, I stepped into the Dallas Contemporary galleries with select members of the press to get an early view of Loris Gréaud's The Unplayed Notes Museum, an exhibition meant to fill the mammoth warehouse space -- roughly 26,000 square feet of emptiness for the artist to play in. And he created what he calls a "new kind of natural history museum," filling much of it with a taste for slick decadence. There were lacquered black paintings and oversized sculptures. In one room a herd of black, mutated sheep were frozen mid-motion, running past globular lights that seemed straight out of the many design boutiques on Dragon Street just a few blocks away.

In another room there was a video of a man and a woman having sex, but filmed with a thermal imaging camera. So, as Gréaud explains it, he hired "sex professionals" and asked them to attempt orgasm so he could film the way heat travels through their bodies. Then, he spins the image in strange ways to make it look artistic. Ah, yes, genius.

And this sort of interest in appearances runs throughout the space. In each room, the only thing binding it all together beyond decorative hollowness are books that line a small portion of the floor in each room, titled Encyclopedia of Irresolution." And in each room of really boring art, I have this urge to topple the statues and tear the art from the walls and throw it across the room, screaming, "ARE YOU EFFING KIDDING ME?"

This is perhaps one of the few things I understand about Gréaud and this exhibition, because he also wanted to destroy it.

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