3D Printing Company to Open Retail Location in Frisco

Categories: Tech, Visual Art

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Captured Dimensions
In 2013, we profiled 3D printing company Captured Dimensions, a Richardson-based company whose goal is to provide people with a futuristic way of making memories. And their technology has only gotten better. Now, the company uses more than 80 DSLR cameras arranged in a 360 degree array to take a super hi-res photo of a person, pet or object from almost every angle imaginable and then create a miniature version using a brand new, production-grade sandstone printer.

To shrink themselves into statues, it used to be that customers would visit Captured Dimensions' nondescript, warehouse-like offices in Richardson to have their photo taken and a print made. The offices served not just as a studio, but as a storage and work facility. But Thursday, the company will open their first retail location in Frisco under the name PhotoSculpt. "The hope for the store is to turn the experience into a more family-friendly one and to offer a more streamlined experience for people wanting to 3D print their loved ones," says company CEO and co-founder Jordan Williams.

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5 Art Exhibitions to See this Weekend

Categories: Visual Art

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Nasher Sculpture Center

Melvin Edwards: Five Decades
Melvin Edwards has spent the last five decades working in steel. His most famous body of work is a series of small, steel reliefs titled "Lynch Fragments." These 3-dimensional pieces, which Edwards has been making for much of his career, aren't overwhelming in size, but carry a powerful presence. These pieces will be displayed alongside his larger pieces and installations. It may sound redundant, but his work can only be fully realized in person. He's been declared one of America's greatest sculptors. See it from 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday or through May 10. Admission to the Nasher is $10. He'll be discussing his work as part of the Nasher 360 Series at 2 p.m. RSVP for that here.

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Loris Gréaud and What He Didn't Create for His Art Exhibition

Categories: Visual Art

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Courtesy Dallas Contemporary

Last Friday afternoon, I stepped into the Dallas Contemporary galleries with select members of the press to get an early view of Loris Gréaud's The Unplayed Notes Museum, an exhibition meant to fill the mammoth warehouse space -- roughly 26,000 square feet of emptiness for the artist to play in. And he created what he calls a "new kind of natural history museum," filling much of it with a taste for slick decadence. There were lacquered black paintings and oversized sculptures. In one room a herd of black, mutated sheep were frozen mid-motion, running past globular lights that seemed straight out of the many design boutiques on Dragon Street just a few blocks away.

In another room there was a video of a man and a woman having sex, but filmed with a thermal imaging camera. So, as Gréaud explains it, he hired "sex professionals" and asked them to attempt orgasm so he could film the way heat travels through their bodies. Then, he spins the image in strange ways to make it look artistic. Ah, yes, genius.

And this sort of interest in appearances runs throughout the space. In each room, the only thing binding it all together beyond decorative hollowness are books that line a small portion of the floor in each room, titled Encyclopedia of Irresolution." And in each room of really boring art, I have this urge to topple the statues and tear the art from the walls and throw it across the room, screaming, "ARE YOU EFFING KIDDING ME?"

This is perhaps one of the few things I understand about Gréaud and this exhibition, because he also wanted to destroy it.

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Video Art Is Dialing Your Number. Answer the Call at the McKinney Avenue Contemporary.

Categories: Visual Art

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Dallas Medianale, an experimental film festival programmed by the Video Association of Dallas, has been going on at the McKinney Avenue Contemporary (3120 McKinney Ave.) since January 9. I went to the opening night, which featured screenings and a series of intermedia performances, including an awesome display by a duo called Cracked Ray Tube, who assembled a tower of old TVs and synced audio to a kaleidoscope of images for a mesmerizing, trippy effect. The event was free, like all of the Medianale events, but I was still happily surprised to find the reasonably large black box theater at the MAC packed that night; attendees spilled out of chairs onto the floor.

This past weekend marked the opening of Call and Response, a video art exhibit in one of the MAC galleries that's co-curated by Charles Dee Mitchell and Danielle Avram-Morgan. Mitchell has curated events for the Video Association of Dallas in the past, and he decided to enlist a co-pilot for this Medianale exhibit, which features a number of iconic video artists including Bruce Nauman and Francis Alys. Mitchell knew Avram-Morgan from The Power Station, a non-profit promoting contemporary art projects in Dallas, and he invited her to choose half of the artists to be presented.


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5 Art Exhibitions to See This Weekend

Categories: Visual Art

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Jesse Morgan Barnett & Jeff Gibbons
It's a rare opportunity to see two of the smartest artists working in Dallas in the same venue. Which is why you'll want to head to the Goss Michael Foundation's exhibition openings from 6-8 p.m. Friday. Jesse Morgan Barnett mines his own life to create abstract sculptural installations. He fills the room with unassuming objects that relate meaningfully. Barnett's exhibition Personal Life will run concurrently with Auto Relativity Kinetotron by Jeff Gibbons -- an artist who works in numerous media and creates thoughtful, absorbing work. See both for free at Goss Michael Foundation (1405 Turtle Creek Blvd.) through March 6. Regular gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday. More information at g-mf.org.

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5 Art Exhibitions to See This Weekend

Categories: Visual Art

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Carolyn Sortor

Carolyn Sortor's Seismic Hive
In a city with far too little video art, and an audience with little to no understanding of how to wade into the small pool that does exist, this weekend brings us exciting exhibition. Intermedia artist Carolyn Sortor works in whatever medium catches her interest. For her exhibitions at the Reading Room (3715 Parry Ave.), Sortor will screen her 2009 series of "hive" videos, which includes one related to the opera, "La Wally." The exhibition will also include "a 15+ foot scroll of YouTube commentary on Maria Callas's performance, printed on vintage seismic graph paper from the Los Alamos National Laboratory. " This exhibition is a perfect complement to the Dallas Medianale, happening around the city.

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5 Art Exhibitions to See This Weekend

Categories: Visual Art

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Cassandra Emswiler Burd

Flowers of War
In grad school I spent one winter break in Los Angeles, which of course required a trip to Malibu to visit, among other sites, the Adamson House, known in some circles as the "Taj Mahal of Tile." Since then, I've moved back to Dallas and fallen eyes over feet in love with the alluring world of Cassandra Emswiler Burd's ceramic art. She builds these stunning tile displays to encourage a reexamination of different areas of human life. For the exhibition at Erin Cluley Gallery (414 Fabrication St.) she has created breakfast tables to explore the similarities in garden planning and war strategy "derived from the work of landscape architect André Le Nôtre and military engineer Marquis de Vauban, both principal advisors to Louis XIV in 17th century France." I can only imagine the day when a house in Dallas becomes known for be filled with Burd tile. Opening reception 6 p.m. Saturday. More info at erincluley.com.

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Experimental Video Art Festival Dallas Medianale Hits Play This Weekend

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Courtesy Dallas VideoFest
House of Style
Dallas is home to VideoFest, the oldest, largest video festival in the United States. Since Bart Weiss started it in the '80s, the annual event has screened all kinds of media, ranging from experimental films, to video art, animations, documentaries and features. And January 9, the Video Association of Dallas -- the force behind VideoFest -- inaugurates a new festival that focuses exclusively on experimental film. The McKinney Avenue Contemporary plays host to Dallas Medianale through March, with a program boasting screenings, exhibitions and performances.

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Inside the Beautifully Grotesque World of Dallas-based Artist Joachim West

Categories: Visual Art

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Joachim West
"It's Just Business"

I've never seen so many uncomfortable people in an art gallery on a Saturday night. RO2 Art's display of Joachim West's Mother Earth Is a Dirty Whore had people crowding around his drawings, pointing at penises and asking questions like, "Is that her ass?" or "He's licking her where?" Some onlookers were looking for the cleanest looking person in each piece to exclaim, "That looks like us." But if they'd looked even closer, they'd see even the smiling couple in the corner of "It's Just Business" wore shit-eating grins -- the man's name tag reading "Hello, My name is Satan." But there really is no way to misunderstand West's work, he's not obscuring rosy messages in grotesque images. His shadowy depictions of the world's seedy underbelly are lucid portrayals of the abject nature of living. And while you might hold the nose of your mind to keep it from seeping in or peek through your fingers at much of it, you'll likely find yourself sucked in like the rest of us, seeking out fellow gallery visitors to process, as one onlooker put it, "this crazy, fucked up shit."


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10 Best Art Exhibitions of 2014

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Zhulong Gallery
Jeremy Couillard's "The Vicious Valley"

This year the Dallas art scene felt rebellious. While one museum exhibition paid homage to a wonderful Dallas-based painter, another had me wanting to commit acts of destruction. At galleries and other exhibitions, the work dripped with anarchy and frustration with the system -- a sentiment felt across the country, and one necessary for art to survive and thrive in a place. There were also a few compelling new media exhibitions (although still too few) in Dallas, and a gallery emerged dedicated to that contemporary art form. The energy of the underground art scene may seem patchy, with the slow collapse of Oliver Francis Galley, and the end of Deep Ellum Windows, and Ware:Wolf:Haus, but all in all it's easy to look back and see a pretty impressive year in review.


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