10 Best Thrift Stores and Vintage Shops in Dallas

Categories: Lists, Shopping


Savvy shoppers are always on the hunt for a good deal. Trust fund babies and lottery winners aside, stylish thrifters know to head to vintage shops when they're looking for champagne flutes on a beer glass budget.

Still, as the "vintage" trend continues to explode, there are a number of so-called "shops"that function as dumping sites for people's old junk. Experienced thrifters may learn to love the search for treasure, but no one wants to sort through piles of ratty, outdated clothing and racks of chipped dishware. Thankfully, Dallas has a number of vintage and thrift stores that put a lot of thought into curating interesting collections from their secondhand offerings. These are ten of the best.

Lula B's
2639 Main St; 1010 N Riverfront Blvd
Lula B's gets a lot of credit for their selection of furniture, mostly mid-century, but this thrift-store-slash-antique-mall has so much more to offer. Spend a little time going through the piles of costume jewelry and stacks of old postcards that vendors use mostly as decoration for their bigger wares. That being said, I did score an old Herman Miller desk chair there for less than $100, so you shouldn't skip out on the furniture bargains either.


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Shastra Home Is Now Open in the Design District

Categories: Fashion, Shopping

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Photos by Catherine Downes
The Design District welcomed its latest decor store, Shastra Home, a few weeks ago. The mid-sized boutique specializes in fair-trade artisan goods created in India.

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Seven Ways Sex and the City Would've Been Different in Dallas

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wikipedia.org

Sarah Jessica Parker will be in Dallas on March 9 to promote her shoe line and probably make Nordstrom's in NorthPark a giant nightmare of starstruck women of all ages. The department store won't be safe to go near for an entire afternoon.
SJP is best known as her New York-based character Carrie Bradshaw from Sex and the City. To celebrate her upcoming arrival, here are seven ways the HBO series would have been different if it was set in Dallas.

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At The DIME Store in Denton, Home Is Where the Art Is

Categories: Shopping

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All photos by Jane R. LeBlanc
The DIME Store
On South Locust Street in Denton, between the Davis Purity Bakery and El Guapo's, sits a small brick building. Inside, children's stuffed animals, kitchen tea towels, handbags and a menagerie of other items are lined along the walls and arranged on tabletops, in baskets and even on an old stove. Almost everything here at The DIME Store (Denton Independent Maker Exchange) is for sale -- even the furniture. What sets this store apart from others, though, is that everything is handcrafted by more than 40 artists local to Denton (meaning they have either lived in Denton or still do).

The DIME Store started as Etsy Denton back in 2010, an online store on Etsy.com Etsy veterans Rachel Aughtry, who makes one-of-a-kind handbags, and Shelley Christner, who creates funky housewares, started Etsy Denton after meeting at the Denton Community Market in 2010, a local art and produce market. All the vendors, including Aughtry and Christner, came out each week to sell their pieces. "We formed a little community," Aughtry says. Aughtry, 25, holds a bachelor's degree from UNT in fiber art, while Christner (who's a little older) has her bachelor's in engineering geology from Texas A&M. "I always had been a more creative person," Christner says. "[Engineering geology] wasn't really my desire, it was more something my father wanted me to do. I wanted to be an interior designer. But that wasn't acceptable." After earning her degree, she got married and started a family. Now, more than 20 years later, she gets to live her creative dream alongside Aughtry. And it all started at the Denton Community Market.

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Cut Through the Crap on Etsy With Our Guide to Gifts from the Heart of Dallas

Categories: Holiday, Shopping

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"Live Long and PawsPurr" from Rayguns and Robots
Despite the fact that etsy has officially been infiltrated by crap, there are still a few gems out there. Some even call Dallas their home. Here's a list of the top etsy Dallas vendors that'll make you proud to share your tap water with them.

They're listed in no particular order with the exception of the first three that you've probably already heard of ... unless you've been living under a white rock or something. (A Dallas pun?!? You're welcome.)

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Dowdy Studio
Located over behind goodfriend, this T-shirt shop has quirky, cool designs and best of all? They're not printed on shit Anvil shirts. Pictured above is men's Mer-Jack, $26.


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The 10 Best Gift Shops in Dallas

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Jason Yang
We Are 1976
A great gift shop is a place where art and consumerism meet. Until you enter its doors, you never really appreciated the beauty of taxidermy, or you never you desired -- or in fact needed -- a mannequin dressed as an Aztec warrior. Well, maybe you don't need one, but your best bro's wedding is coming up ...

As part of our annual celebration of all the best things in Dallas, we've scoured the streets to find some of the coolest, artiest and most eclectic shops in town, places that offer a unique blend of works from local and international artists, toys for you inner child and cool gifts for you besties. Here is our list of our 10 favorites.

See also: Best of Dallas 2013

We Are 1976
The winner for the best gift shop in our 2013 Best of Dallas issue, We Are 1976 has nothing to do with 1976 except for the owners' birth year. Its inventory carries original and affordable prints from local artists ($30 and up), handmade or exclusive accessories, pocketknife necklaces, Japanese candy and loads of other pick-me-ups. If you'd rather make your own art, this shop offers letterpress and art workshops, teaching the print and paint skills needed for a typeset poster, monogram, or other art design ($35 to $180). Nothing like a gift made with love (or laziness).


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Self-Defense Classes, Shopping and Discounts: Bevello Knows How to Empower

Categories: Shopping

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Allison Perkins
Knees up ...
I've been meaning to take a self-defense class forever. Seriously. You know the day dinosaurs were invented? It was the day before that. As a single girl who lives alone -- I write under a pen name so don't try to abduct me, you dummies -- I have a pretty serious need to take care of myself. Mace would be a great idea. Wasp spray an even better one. A gun would be fantastic, if I weren't so confident my cat would accidentally shoot me.

Cut to the present. I get an email: "Hey you wanna take a self-defense class tomorrow night?" The obvious answer is "yep," but my response was "maybe." First I needed to ask a co-worker if I should really skip Zumba for self-defense? "Like really really? You're sure?" "Yes, dummy, take the class." And off we go.

The class I signed up for is a weird little hybrid of huh and what located in Snider Plaza. Every other week this thing called Tough Fitness starring Evan Duncan teaches a self-defense class in a boutique named Bevello. (The class costs only $20, but you save 20 percent off your entire Bevello purchase, so spend $100 and break even, Steven.)

Each class lasts 45 minutes to an hour which is PERFECT. Duncan likes to focus on three or four moves instead of overloading your brain with a shitload of defense strategies you'll forget the minute you walk out the door. He brings an assistant, too, and demonstrates everything thoroughly before it's your turn.

Guess what? Self-defense isn't anything like that episode of Designing Women where they yelled NO and kneed an overly padded man in the crotch. With Duncan, you'll learn genuinely useful moves and you can save the crotch kicks for co-workers.

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Sugar Derby Mobile Vintage Shop is Having a Liquidation Sale, Plans to Reopen as a Photobooth

Categories: Shopping

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Photos by Catherine Downes
In April of 2012, vintage enthusiast Melissa Mackaly set out to create a mobile vintage shop that specialized in housewares. "It's my passion," she said this week, while tending the cash table at her "estate sale" in an unmarked building at 2650 Main in Deep Ellum on Thursday.

The mint green 1958 Cardinal trailer that has traveled across the metroplex, selling goods at music venues, art events and festivals has come to a temporary halt, and all of Mackaly's treasures are up for grabs at a discounted price this weekend.

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The 11 Rooms We Want to Buy During Friday's Dwell With Dignity Thrift Studio

Categories: Shopping

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Image by Lance Selgo, of Unique Exposure Photography
There's a feeling of pride that comes from living in a furnished home, rather than just a shelter. Going above barren fundamental need, having a thoughtfully designed area to collapse in affects our coping abilities. With attachment to space comes increased emotional connections -- both to our physical location and our willingness to let others in.

That's not news to Lisa Robison and Kim Turner, the organized forces behind Dwell with Dignity, the local non-profit that decorates and furnishes donated spaces for families transitioning out of homelessness. It's such a lovely mission, and watching theirAbout Us video made my eyes get all sweaty.

The mission has united Dallas' design community. Now, when furniture arrives slightly damaged to a showroom, it's often donated to the cause. Dwell's objective is further bolstered through its biannual shopping events, like the one popping up this Friday, at 1100 Slocum Street, Suite 590.

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Local Glasses Company Lights Up the Dallas Party Scene

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www.facebook.com/SPECTIFIEDDesigns
Some of Spectified's EL wire specs.
Local entrepreneurs Austin Emmert and Caden Stevens are bringing focus to the "making-people-look-cooler-when-they-party" business. Last year, the former fraternity brothers turned business partners founded the eye wear line, Spectified. The attraction lies in the electroluminescent wire (aka EL wire), that's built into the frames, causing the shades to light up.

The glasses have been popping up at concerts and music festivals, and according to Emmert, they've been illuminating the faces of music industry celebs like David Guetta, Diplo, Black Eyed Peas, Ellie Goulding and Calvin Harris. No big deal.

We got with founding member Austin Emmert and asked him a few things about his emerging business and where he plans to take it in 2013.

Can you tell me a little about how your business started?
We had seen similar glasses in the past but felt like we could come up with a style that was more illuminate and attractive. We would wear our prototypes at major festivals and found ourselves overwhelmed by attention. Everyone would scream "Oh my god! Where did you get those?" "those are badass," "can I take a picture with you?" Caden and I then discussed pursuing this venture full time. I quit my job in March and haven't looked back.


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