Tattooed Hippie Pirate Mommas Find New Beneficiaries for Their Calendar Fundraiser

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Courts Griner Photography
Tattooed Hippie Pirate Momma members Lori Peniston, Stacy Willingham, Stephanie Meier and Amanda Servis in one of the many photos from the group's charity pinup calendar that will be released on December 1.
Last week was a strange one for Tattooed Hippie Pirate Mommas founder Stacy Willingham. She was already getting a ton of publicity for the mom group she founded and the calendar she helped create to raise money for charity.

It reached an interesting new level when we reported that the Children's Advocacy Center for Denton County (CACDC), the organization that the group originally intended to give the calendar's proceeds, had turned the donation down because "the money was raised with a pinup calendar that could be perceived by some as sexual in nature," according to a statement released by the center's executive director, Dan Leal.

See also: Denton Children's Advocacy Group Director Refuses Tattooed Moms' Donation

The comments and reactions that followed featured a mix of outrage that a charity would turn down the donation and a handful of fairly cruel criticisms of the moms.

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(UPDATED) Denton Children's Advocacy Group Director Refuses Tattooed Moms' Donation

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Photo by Danny Gallagher
Mother and Tattooed Hippie Pirate Mommas founder Stacy Willingham spends time with her kids, 5-year-old Cole and 2-year-old Stella, and two massive dogs Zeus and Allie.

UPDATE, 2:40 p.m.: Dan Leal, the center's executive director, emailed us this statement this afternoon:

"The Children's Advocacy Center for Denton County appreciated the generous offer made by the Tattooed Hippie Pirate Mommas organization; however, the money was raised with a pin up calendar that could be perceived by some as sexual in nature and our Children's Advocacy Center's mission is to provide justice and healing for children who are the victims of sexual abuse. Unfortunately, we could not accept the proceeds of this pin up calendar's sales because of the calendar's possible perception, and not the hard working mothers who sponsored it."

Original story follows:

Stacy Willingham of Denton, a freelance writer and mother of two very active kids, had trouble fitting in with the square, un-inked, Red State of mind of some pockets of suburban Texas motherhood. She birthed her youngest daughter Stella in 2011 and like most moms, she needed other moms to talk to about trying to juggle a life, a career and two kids.

She described it as an unfriendly experience.

"They acted like I was stupid for being so stressed out, for lack of a better word," Willingham said as she tries to keep her oldest son Cole from making an old fashioned stack of mud pies in their backyard. "They ridiculed me for being open and talkative and I don't get it. ... I just wanted other moms to talk to."

Stacy also has two arms full of carefully sketched tattoos, and like most of her tattooed hippie mommas, she said they also had trouble fitting into "traditional" mom groups. So they got together and formed the Tattooed Hippie Pirate Mommas. It quickly spawned other chapters across the region, the state, the rest of the country and even in London. They started using their awesome, new-found mommy powers to start fundraisers to raise money for nonprofit groups of their choosing. That honor would have gone to the Children's Advocacy Center of Denton County but Development Director Stacie Wainscott declined their offer "due to the conservative nature of our organization," according to an email sent to Willingham.

"It's total bullshit," Stacy said.

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Fresh Ink: A Writer's Journey through a Dallas Tattoo Rite of Passage

Categories: Ink Spot

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Steve Visneau
Local writers love scribbling out pieces that "Deep Ellum is back." It happens whenever they find themselves immersed in an Elm Street festival or caught in the afterglow of an exceptionally great evening in the neighborhood. But that approach is tired and lazy. Writing that story further validates that the area needs recognition of a resurgence, which it doesn't.

Let's be brutally honest: Deep Ellum never left. And part of the reason it never left is because of people like Oliver Peck.

Since 1996 when he became head artist at Elm St. Tattoos, Peck has overseen the boom and bust periods in Dallas' famed entertainment district, and with his growth into a national celebrity via his role on the Tattoo Reality show Inkmasters, Peck has only helped usher in a new level of acclaim for the area. Last weekend he used all of his resources -- friends, patrons and employees -- to celebrate the neighborhood he never left in a tattoo festival too large to fit inside his Elm St. shop.

It was Peck's 20th Friday the 13th 24-hour tattoo marathon. Simply lining up patrons and trying to reclaim his old Guinness World Record victory for most tattoos performed in a day would have, alone, been worth celebrating, but he and the Deep Ellum Illuminati saw an opportunity to turn the event into something bigger. Thus the five-day Elm Street Music & Tattoo Festival was born.

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Ink Spot: This Dude's Tattoos Are Intense, and So Are His Views About Them

Categories: Ink Spot

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In Ink Spot, we stop people in Dallas to shoot, and learn about, their body art. Know an interesting human canvas? Leave a tip in the comments.

Justin Wilson combines his appreciation of remix culture and traditional tattoo art in juxtaposed images on his arms. "I like a subversive take on classic tattoo art," Wilson says. "When I see [traditional tattoos] on other people I still think it looks cool, but for myself I just want to do a different take on it."

"The traditional style to me is just so common now. I still appreciate it aesthetically for what it is and what it began, but it's like punk rock. If you're not turning punk rock on its head it just starts to sound the same."

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This Inked-Up Dallas Gal Sees Her Tattoos as Milestones

Categories: Ink Spot

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Photos by Mattie Stafford
Of all of Allison Wilt's tattoos, only a few have personal meaning. There's a portrait on her left forearm of a young boy in a far away land that's dedicated to her grandfather's adventurous spirit. A sugary sweet cupcake sits just above, scribed with the name of Wilt's sister, "Molly Kay." A tribute-in-progress, the outline of an airplane stretches across the opposite shoulder, a love note to her father and brother who both fly airplanes. And completing the family ties is a replication of a Shel Silverstein illustration, meant to forever remind Wilt of a poem her mother read her as a child.

The rest of 'em, which she estimates to be "between fifteen and forty," are really just for kicks.

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Known Internationally as The King of Script, Tattoo Artist Boog Deniro Opens Shop in Fort Worth on Saturday

Categories: Ink Spot

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Photos by Mattie Stafford
In Ink Spot, we stop people in Dallas to shoot, and learn about, their body art. Know an interesting human canvas? Leave a tip in the comments.

See also: This Art Handler's Tattoos Are Fading, But the Pride He Feels for Them Isn't

Dallas native Boog Deniro, known most commonly as just "Boog" or "Boogstar" got his start tattooing out of a backpack. 25 years later he's known around the world as an artist and publisher of flash books, and this weekend he'll add Tattoo Shop Owner to his list of accomplishments when his new storefront, Trap House Ink, opens in Fort Worth.

His latest book of tat typeset, The First 48, is a collaboration with fellow artist Mr. Flaks, who's flying in for Saturday's opening from his California home base. (They'll be signing copies, so pick one up.)

Boog's style of art is based largely off of traditional Latino tattoo culture, using all back and grey, religious icons and even clown themes. However, it is his lettering that has gained him the most popularity and many nick names, including "The King of Script."

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This Art Handler's Tattoos Are Fading, But the Pride He Feels for Them Isn't

Categories: Ink Spot

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Photos by Mattie Stafford
In Ink Spot, we stop people in Dallas to shoot, and learn about, their body art. Know an interesting human canvas? Leave a tip in the comments.

Unlike many people with tattoos, photographer and art handler Jordan Inge has no plans to touch up his body art. Each represents a different time in his life, he says, and he likes the way tattoos stretch and fade, showing the passing of time.

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What Tats Do You Have for Your Grandma?

Categories: Ink Spot

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Photos by Mattie Stafford
In Ink Spot, we stop people in Dallas to shoot, and learn about, their body art. Know an interesting human canvas? Leave a tip in the comments.

Joshua Stephens is a self-proclaimed "corporate ladder climber by day and aspiring musician by night" whose full left sleeve makes up the bulk of his ink. With at least 20 hours spent on that arm alone, Stephens says it's been a pricey endeavor but worth the investment of both time and money.

See also: This Barista's Tats Pay Homage to His Favorite Things, Including Keith Haring and Coffee

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This Barista's Tats Pay Homage to His Favorite Things, Including Keith Haring and Coffee

Categories: Ink Spot

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Photos by Mattie Stafford
In Ink Spot, we stop people in Dallas to shoot, and learn about, their body art. Know an interesting human canvas? Leave a tip in the comments.

Eamon Maxwell, a soft-spoken 23-year-old from Coppell, already has 12 tattoos with plans for more. Maxwell says he wants people to see his tattoos as sort of an "about-me section."

See also:
This Fort Worth Stylist Wants to be Inked Head-to-Toe; She's Well On Her Way

When he's not working behind the bar at The Pearl Cup, Eamon Maxwell can be found perched at one of Dallas' many coffee shops with a book and a latte. His most recent tattoo is a dedication to his love of coffee, a redish zig-zag that turns into a heart on his forearm.The design imitates a design often poured into a latte.


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This Fort Worth Stylist Wants to be Inked Head-to-Toe; She's Well On Her Way (NSFW)

Categories: Ink Spot

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Photos by Amy Price
Desiree Yanez's impeccable hair is no match for her flawless tattoos. The 22-year-old hair stylist at Esoterica Salon in Fort Worth has dedicated pretty much her entire body to the art of tattoos. Her knuckles bare the words "Pish Posh" in delicate cursive and can only be read when held closed. "Something my mom used to say," Yanex says. She "never cussed, so instead of saying 'bullshit' she'd say 'pish posh.'"

See also: A Dallas Surfer and Flowrider Champion Shows Off Her Aqua-Inspired Tats

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