A Short Guide to Self-Awareness in Gig Photography

Categories: Music Etiquette

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Gavin Cleaver
An amateur attempt, sure, but I didn't get in anyone's way.

Kid Congo Powers was fantastic last night. He truly was. A full-blooded romp through a set that drew from his past as an '80s pioneer of post-punk, as well as just some straight up punk, his was a stage presence far from the snarling beast you might have expected. Instead, it was like your lovely, friendly old neighbor had decided to play you some songs in a tiny room. He grooved, he smiled, he had a speaking voice like honey, and he told stories about hitch hiking across America when he was 15.

See also: Where Do You Go From Being A Bad Seed?

I would like to take this opportunity, though, to revisit the problems of gig-going etiquette, this time for photographers. Last night, there was a photographer who spent the entire concert jumping on the stage to photograph the band from three feet away, using the flash on his camera. Let's unpack the problems there, bearing in mind I am certainly no photographer.

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Seated Gigs: A Guide To Dealing With Idiots, Using Passive-Aggressive Actions

Categories: Music Etiquette

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Christian Rowlands

We've all been there. You're at a seated gig, possibly in a large stadium or auditorium, and the people around you only serve to remind you how much you dislike humanity. With their phones, their talking, and their general disregard for the etiquette of polite society, they are in actual fact the worst. It's like the cinema, but at a concert there are actually far greater opportunities to make your feelings partially clear, using the great power of passive-aggressive interference. Do not directly tell them to shut up. That would itself be uncouth.


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How to Dress at Concerts for Comfort, Lookin' Cool and Getting a Drink

Categories: Music Etiquette

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MAEGAN PUETZ
Proper rave attire: Skin and bright colors.

When you go to a concert, which is purportedly a collection of like-minded people on the grounds that you're all there to see a particular thing you personally enjoy, you have two choices. You can either dress like you think everyone else will, or you can shout "FUCK IT" into the mirror and dress entirely the opposite way. The middle ground, where you try for either and totally misjudge it, is where madness lies. Here's a guide to the etiquette of dressing for a concert.


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A Guide To Road Tripping to Concerts

Categories: Music Etiquette

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It occurs to me this country is quite spaced out. Not in the drugs sense, although God knows that happens too, but in the sense it is really quite large. I mean, have you seen a map? That shit is humongous. Furthermore, there are only so many places poor overworked touring bands can play. Often, an artist you desperately want to see may end up in a town the next state (or three) over. At this point you have two choices. Either stay at home and be really lame, or pack up the car and head out on the highway, lookin' for adventure, and whatever comes my (your) way. You'll need some advice for these road trips though. Here it is.


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A Music Lover's Advice for Dealing with the Brutal Texas Summer

Categories: Music Etiquette

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Marco Torres

Even though it may seem to you that the summer has been replaced by a wind tunnel and a hyperactive dry ice machine, you know what's coming. It's going to be warmer than the surface of the sun (I am aware of the logical impossibility of this statement), and promoters are still going to schedule outdoor gigs, because they hate you and only care about your money. While that's not entirely true (they also care about your credit rating and all those bands you keep as a guilty secret), you are going to need some friendly advice to make it through another Texas summer with all your skin intact.

See also:
-Music Etiquette archives
-50 Don'ts For Your ACL Festival Weekend
-Five WTF Examples of Marketing at SXSW

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How to Behave at Sold-Out Shows: Stop Treating Humans Like Shrubs

Categories: Music Etiquette

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Mike Brooks
Now, I'm no fireman, obviously, but it seems to me that when some standing room only venues sell out, they really sell out. I mean like you couldn't fit another person in there with a really big shoehorn. Sometimes these experiences can be traumatic. Other times they can be fantastic. Maybe you can make the difference. Here's how:

See also:
-Music Etiquette archives
-The Smashing Pumpkins Ruined My Joy, Again, Last Night at The Palladium

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How to Behave in Mosh Pits: Focus on the Music, Not Hurting People

Categories: Music Etiquette

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Mike Brooks
Apparently the youth of today can sometimes be found in "pits" and within these pits it is agreed upon that they will "mosh," a word that covers a variety of bodily gyrations and movements. While in Britain obviously we call them "polite sections" where everyone vigorously shakes hands and nods gently in time to the music, I've been here long enough now that I've seen a thing or two.*

See also:
-Music Etiquette archives
-Songs That Have Hidden Messages When Played in Reverse

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How to Smoke at Shows, Now that It's Not Cool Anymore

Categories: Music Etiquette

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Every week Gavin will be presenting a guide to basic notions of common sense he feels are sometimes lacking from various aspects of the world of music. Also, he's British, and they're polite, right?

After Rubber Gloves Rehearsal Studios banned smoking to an overwhelmingly positive reaction this week, we thought it might be high time to remind smokers of the etiquettes of smoking at gigs. As someone who smokes, I'm well aware of the many social pitfalls of my death-inducing pursuit. I'm not Captain Buzzkill here from the Planet Square, but have some respect, eh?

See also:
-Bands: Please Stop Annoying the Shit Out of Everyone on Social Media
-How to Behave at Quiet Shows: Shut Up and Put Your Phone Away


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How to Successfully Order Drinks at Shows Without Pissing Everyone Off

Categories: Music Etiquette

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acnatta/flickr
You're going to want a plan.

Every week Gavin will be presenting a guide to basic notions of common sense he feels are sometimes lacking from various aspects of the world of music. Also, he's British, and they're polite, right?

Besides one or more musicians making a sound, what is the most important aspect of live music? Those of you who said "friends and loved ones" are out. What did they ever do? It's clearly alcohol. Alcohol makes a bad gig entertaining and a good gig a life-affirming memorable experience. However, actually obtaining alcohol at a gig can be a situation rife with hidden social norms and problems to overcome. Here's a quick guide to the etiquette of ordering a drink at a gig.

See also:
-Bands: Please Stop Annoying the Shit Out of Everyone on Social Media
-How to Behave at Quiet Shows: Shut Up and Put Your Phone Away


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Bands: Please Stop Annoying the Shit Out of Everyone on Social Media

Categories: Music Etiquette

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MDGovpics
Maybe put that thing away once in a while, yeah?

Every week Gavin will be presenting a guide to basic notions of common sense he feels are sometimes lacking from various aspects of the world of music. Also, he's British, and they're polite, right?

Social media. It's pretty great for bands. They can list their gigs, share updates, and connect with fans. So why are so many of them so utterly shit at it that they cross over into the dangerous territory known as "more annoying than Pitbull?" Here are some common band mistakes of social media etiquette, that most important unspoken social contract between us all.

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