Looking At The Pros and Cons of Apple's iCloud

Categories: DFW Music News
appleicloud.jpg
Well, the big announcement came yesterday -- that Apple would be getting into cloud technology, rendering all of its current devices compatible with new iCloud service.

With CEO Steve Jobs at the helm, Apple hopes the announcement will drastically change how Mac users store their information. In the case of music lovers, consumers can expect the iCloud to drastically change the way we store and listen to music.

Basically, the service will make all of the music you have on one device available to be heard on all of your devices. So, for example, if you purchase the new My Morning Jacket album, Circuital, on your iPhone, the cloud will automatically push it to your computer, your iPad, and so on.

When the service becomes available to customers (the release date has yet to be announced), all music previously purchased through iTunes will be "iClouded." But here's the rub: Any music purchased or ripped elsewhere will only be pushed to your other devices after you've paid an annual fee of $24.99.

But, for only a couple of bucks a month, it certainly isn't a deal-breaker. Especially not for something so potentially revolutionary.

So we can't help but ask: Will the iCloud actually improve the way we store and listen to music? We're not so sure, actually. After the jump, we break down the potential pros and cons of the iCloud.

Pros
You won't run out of space.
This is probably the biggest selling point for iCloud. If you're like us, you currently have to delete an entire album from your iPod in order slip a new one on there. You're limited in your storage capacity. But, with iCloud, it won't matter how much storage space you have on your devices; you'll have access to as much music as you want no matter which one you're using (assuming that device has Internet capabilities).

No more syncing.

Listen: It sucks when you've just purchased a few records from iTunes onto your computer and then you have to sync them to your iPhone, iPod, iPad and so on. iCloud eliminates the hassle and the time it takes to update all your devices. For $24.99 a year, your songs will automatically be sent to the cloud, and thus all of your devices, once you've uploaded it to a computer.

You can't lose your music.

If you lose your device with all your music on it, it will automatically sync up with a replacement device. In other words: You won't lose your songs. But backing up your songs elsewhere is probably still a good idea.

It's convenient
.
You can listen to your music anywhere. Store it, too. That's awesome.

Now, onto the cons...
My Voice Nation Help
15 comments
Sort: Newest | Oldest
Post
Post

You have misunderstood the iCloud payment scheme.  The service is FREE for the normal user, your music purchased through iTunes will automatically become available on all other devices, regardless of where you download them (iPhone, iPad, iMac, etc.).  The $24.99 charge is simply for those user's with a substantially large music library obtained by other means, like ripped from a CD collection.  Those songs will be transferred to the iCloud if the user pays the monthly fee, even though they haven't been bought on iTunes.

Daniel Hopkins
Daniel Hopkins

No, that's pretty much what I stated above. Take into account the fact that few people have purchased their music exclusively from the iTunes music store. Essentially, everyone will need to pay this fee in order to listen to their entire music collection on all of their devices.

Rainier Islas
Rainier Islas

Yeah, you are not paying twice... you already have your music, and is up to you if you want to use apple cloud service to get your music in all your devices easier.. also you get high quality mp3! this can be very useful for some people.

Quin
Quin

How is that even remotely paying for something twice? That is a ridiculous argument.  You are paying for storage essentially and for them to use their resources to port your info across your different devices.  You are not paying again for your music.  These 'cons' are terrible.  

Daniel Hopkins
Daniel Hopkins

I already bought the music, and now I have to pay a yearly fee just to listen to it on all my devices. It's like I'm renting my own music. No thanks.

Tendo87
Tendo87

Only thing I wanna say is about the last line, "The iCloud: Best new development ever?"This isn't new, Google's been doing cloud services for a few years now, and both Amazon and Google along with other smaller companies beat them to the music storage. So I don't think "new" should be the word to describe the service.

biz as usual
biz as usual

sounds to me like you bought the new my morning whatevs box O' crapola...

Homosapien
Homosapien

It seems the time has come for somebody to open the worlds first CD Museum.

biz as usual
biz as usual

they already have it. just go to 5500 greenville avenue...

therrick
therrick

I dunno I like Amazon's cloud drive better. They had a deal (not sure if they still have it or not), that when you buy one MP3 album from them and store it on your (their) cloud drive you get an automatic upgrade to 20GB of space. Yet any music you buy from them doesn't count towards your space. Plus you can upload any type of file to your cloud drive. Is Apple's just music? Now if you go beyond that 20 gig limit you have to start paying extra for it.

tkimz
tkimz

The 20gb is only free for the first year, then you have to pay for it after that.

Julian West
Julian West

One of the Cons may be addressed w/ Playlists:  if you lose access to the cloud ("go offline" or need to sync your music to an old non-Internet iPod)  it's simple -- iCloud's $25/yr plan lets you download fresh copies of your music locally to Playlists for traditional sync, or download playlists to your wifi-enabled iDevice.   So if you do some playlists like old school, when you lose access to the cloud...the iCloud will have dumped actual audio on your device to carry along, instead of the default "streaming" of your music.  Of course, Apple hasn't clarified that yet -- they never do clarify things at first. They really do make a lot of this stuff up as they go.

One "Con" for Audiojunkies --- the "limit" of 20,000 - 25,000 songs for the $25/yr plan sounds pretty awesome -- but what of those who were ripping/collecting digital music since the 90s...it's possible they'll have a bit more?  Different price-tier for them?  Apple ain't sayin'

Another "Con" with MobileMe retiring the "Back to My Mac" and Bookmark-sync (that allowed your iPad/iPhone to have your Safari bookmarks too) are hit features that may be going away.  Again, Apple ain't saying.   Pushes even more folks to Chrome & Firefox for the built-in bookmark sync they provide.  Smart move, Apple.

Meh.   Yer gonna see old skool MP3 folks stay with sync'ing from a personal Media drive for awhile to come.   And Audiophiles?  They won't even come near it, they got their FLAC files and vinyl.  Still interesting stuff though...

Noah W. Bailey
Noah W. Bailey

Another con from what I understand is that the matching service will only match songs that are sold on itunes. That means no cd-r eps from obscure North Texas bands and no live bootlegs. Which means Wilonsky is shit out of luck.

Julian West
Julian West

Yep -- that stuff gets "uploaded" and stored for forwarding to your other devices if it can't "match" it.   So folks like Wilonsky will have a slow slow slow experience with iCloud the first few weeks.  Either that or they start listening to Lady Gaga.

Now Trending

From the Vault

 

Dallas Event Tickets
Loading...